Investigation of corrosion inhibitors in protective coastings

Project ID: 1703
Principal Investigator: David Tordonato
Research Topic: Repair and Maintenance
Funded Fiscal Years: 2017
Keywords: None

Research Question

This project seeks to determine the effectiveness of contemporary coatings which utilize inhibitive pigments as the primary mechanism for corrosion protection. Can inhibitive pigments extend the service life of an existing coating systems in freshwater immersion, atmospheric service, or fluctuating immersion service? Can environmentally safe inhibitive pigments be as effective as the original lead and chromium containing paint systems?

Need and Benefit

There is a need to increase the service life of protective coatings used by Reclamation. Inhibitive pigments are an under-utilized tool in the arsenal of corrosion protection. By exploring this aspect of corrosion protection, it may be
possible to extend the service life of existing resins such as epoxies which have demonstrated a shorter service life than legacy coating systems such as lead-based paint. This could extend duration between maintenance outages and reduce equipment life cycle costs.

Contributing Partners

Contact the Principal Investigator for information about partners.

Research Products

Bureau of Reclamation Review

The following documents were reviewed by experts in fields relating to this project's study and findings. The results were determined to be achieved using valid means.

Investigation of corrosion inhibitors in protective coastings (final, PDF, 1.0MB)
By Stephanie Prochaska, Dave Tordonato,
Research Product completed on September 30, 2017

This research product summarizes the research results and potential application to Reclamation's mission.

Investigation of corrosion inhibitors in protective coastings (final, PDF, 1.0MB)
By Stephanie Prochaska, Dave Tordonato,
Research Product completed on September 30, 2017

This research product summarizes the research results and potential application to Reclamation's mission.


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Last Updated: 4/4/17