Development of Software Tools for Efficient Processing of Bathymetry and Discharge Data

Project ID: 1779
Principal Investigator: Daniel Dombroski
Research Topic: Sediment Management and River Restoration
Funded Fiscal Years: 2017
Keywords: None

Research Question

How can Reclamation TSC most efficiently produce results from bathymetric surveys and discharge measurements by improving the functionality of processing tools?

Need and Benefit

Need:
Detailed bathymetry data is important for estimating zones of sediment aggradation and degradation in rivers and reservoirs (with implications to reservoir sustainability), tracking channel and bar migration, and for setup and calibration of numerical models. Reclamation has a responsibility to its clients and taxpayers to perform studies efficiently as possible.
Benefit:
The product of the work will be a tool that helps reclamation engineers perform their jobs more cost-effectively and with less potential for user error.
Urgency:
Bathymetric surveys are increasingly an integral part of the hydraulic studies that the Bureau of Reclamation performs for its clients. If the proposed work is not completed, Reclamation engineers will struggle to keep up with current workload.

Contributing Partners

Contact the Principal Investigator for information about partners.

Research Products

Bureau of Reclamation Review

The following documents were reviewed by experts in fields relating to this project's study and findings. The results were determined to be achieved using valid means.

Development of Software Tools for Efficient Processing of Bathymetry and Discharge Data (final, PDF, 5.0MB)
By Daniel Dombroski
Research Product completed on September 30, 2017

This research product summarizes the research results and potential application to Reclamation's mission.

Development of Software Tools for Efficient Processing of Bathymetry and Discharge Data (final, PDF, 5.0MB)
By Daniel Dombroski
Research Product completed on September 30, 2017

This research product summarizes the research results and potential application to Reclamation's mission.


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Last Updated: 4/4/17