Modeling of complex sediment processes using experimental data and laboratory measurements

Project ID: 1778
Principal Investigator: Daniel Dombroski
Research Topic: Sediment Management and River Restoration
Funded Fiscal Years: 2017 and 2018
Keywords: None

Research Question

How can insights from focused laboratory experiments be used to inform hydraulic and sediment transport models for improved predictions of complex sedimentation processes?
Can unsteady flow and sediment characteristics be used to formulate quantitative dependencies between turbulent flow models and sediment transport models?
Can unsteady flow, vegetation, and sediment characteristics be used to formulate quantitative dependencies between turbulent flow models and sediment transport models under vegetated flow conditions?
How can collaborations with academic researchers in the field of ecohydraulics be most fruitful in supporting the Reclamation mission and advancing state of the art capabilities?

Need and Benefit

Need
Increasing priority placed on balancing the function of ecosystems and water infrastructure necessitates continued development of tools that can better predict the effects of complex ecohydraulic processes related to sediment transport in the riparian environment. Understanding transport of sediment is also critical to the design of river restoration strategies that involve the engineered manipulation of channel geometry and riparian vegetation. Quantitative understanding of linkages between vegetation and sediment transport is necessary in order to design sustainable river restoration projects.
Benefit
The key to improving Reclamation's capabilities in simulating complex sedimentation processes lies in improving quantitative predictive tools. Reclamation is poised to become a pioneering agency in river restoration design and analysis. Reclamation engineers will be able to design and build more sustainable and effective river restoration strategies.

Contributing Partners

Contact the Principal Investigator for information about partners.

Research Products

Please contact research@usbr.gov about research products related to this project.


Return to Research Projects

Last Updated: 4/4/17