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Lanie Paquin named deputy regional director for technical services at California-Great Basin Region

Media Contact: Mary Lee Knecht 916-978-5100 mgarrisonknecht@usbr.gov
For Release: Jun 12, 2024
Lanie Paquin Lanie Paquin

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – The Bureau of Reclamation today announced the selection of Lanie Paquin as deputy regional director for technical services for the California-Great Basin Region.

Paquin previously served as area manager for the Snake River Area Office, where she oversaw the management, development and protection of water and related resources for Reclamation projects across the Snake River drainage basin.

“Lanie brings a wealth of knowledge, expertise and experience and she will be an outstanding addition to the region’s leadership team,” said California Great-Basin Regional Director Karl Stock.

Paquin joined Reclamation in 2002 as a student in the Federal Career Internship program. She became the regional Geographic Information System manager in 2008, leading the application and development of GIS and remote sensing technology. Between 2012 and 2014, Paquin served as the Columbia-Pacific Northwest regional liaison to the commissioner’s office in Washington, D.C. 

In 2015, she became the deputy area manager for the Snake River Area Office, also serving as the Middle Snake Field Office Manager. Paquin returned to the Columbia-Pacific Northwest Regional Office to lead the formation of the Regional Environmental Services Office responsible for regional environmental practices and programs to implement National Environmental Policy Act, Endangered Species Act and other environmental laws and regulations, including environmental compliance for the multi-agency Columbia River System Operations.

Paquin has a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from the University of New Hampshire and a Master of Science degree in geography from Portland State University in Oregon.

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