Effect of Electric Fish Barriers on Corrosion and Cathodic Protection

Project ID: 1722
Principal Investigator: Atousa Plaseied
Research Topic: Fish Passage and Entrainment
Funded Fiscal Years: 2017, 2018 and 2019
Keywords: None

Research Question

Is there an adverse effect on the corrosion of nearby structures by electric fish barriers? Can potential interference issues be created between cathodic protection systems and electric fish barriers affecting the operational electrical fields of either? Additionally, can a fish barrier system be utilized to also cathodically protect a structure?
The goal of this study is to examine the interaction between an electric fish barrier and cathodic protection system. Also, although pulsed cathodic protection is not normally utilized on submerged structures this study will examine whether a pulsed DC electric fish barrier can also be used to protect structures near the fish barrier.

Need and Benefit

Need: The main goal of Reclamation is the delivery of water and generation of power. However, endangered fish species may be affected by this water delivery system. Electric fish barriers can be used to control the movement of fish, thereby protecting them from adverse outcomes due to Reclamation projects.
Urgency: Corrosion is an issue in many bodies of water and immersed structures must be protected, often with some type of cathodic protection system. Interference with cathodic protection systems can be detrimental to both corrosion mitigation and controlling the movement of the fish.
Benefit: Detrimental interference issues could affect the operation of electrical fields of either the cathodic protection system or electric fish barrier. Reclamation would benefit from this investigation by determining and preventing the effects of electric fish barriers on the corrosion of nearby structures and cathodic protection or vice versa.

Contributing Partners

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Research Products

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Last Updated: 4/4/17