Reclamation News Releases http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom News Releases from the Bureau of Reclamation https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=66183 Reclamation updates 2019 Central Valley Project South-of-Delta water allocations
2019-05-22 13:15:00.0 SACRAMENTO, Calif. – The Bureau of Reclamation Wednesday issued updated Central Valley Project South-of-Delta allocations for the 2019 contract year. This update reflects ongoing water supply improvements due to the latest series of storms. <P> With this month’s update, South-of-Delta agricultural water service contractors’ allocations are increased to 70% of their contract total. South-of-Delta allocations for municipal and industrial contractors’ allocations are increased to 95% of their historic use. <P> “The storms experienced in the Central Valley during the past week are unusual this late in the year, bringing the month’s precipitation to over twice its average,” said Mid-Pacific Regional Director Ernest Conant. “The late storms provided an added boost to the already above average precipitation for 2019. Snowpack throughout the state is still about 150% of average for this time of year.” <P> The CVP Friant Division’s allocation remains unchanged for Class 1 contractors at 100%. However, the period for uncontrolled season deliveries to Class 2 contractors has been extended to June 14. (The first 800,000 acre-feet of available water supply is considered Class 1; Class 2 is considered the next amount of available water supply up to 1.4 million acre-feet). <P> All other CVP contractors’ allocations were previously increased to 100% of their contract totals in recent months. <P> The wet conditions this year have allowed Reclamation to meet full allocations for most CVP water users. However, Reclamation has had ongoing challenges in providing higher allocations for South-of-Delta water service contractors in recent decades in part due to regulatory restrictions. Even in above average water years, threatened and endangered species’ requirements, storage limitations and lost conveyance capacity from land subsidence pose challenges on Reclamation’s ability to export water South-of-Delta. <P> Reclamation is currently engaged in several processes to improve its ability to meet the water supply needs of the CVP in an environmentally and economically sound manner. These include several efforts directed by the October 2018 Presidential Memorandum on Promoting the Reliable Supply and Delivery of Water in the West, such as the effort to develop new biological opinions for the long-term coordinated operations of the CVP and State Water Project. <P> Water supply updates are posted at https://www.usbr.gov/mp/cvp-water/index.htm<a href="https://www.usbr.gov/mp/cvp-water/index.html">https://www.usbr.gov/mp/cvp-water/index.html</a> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=66163 Reclamation announces water levels at Montana reservoirs
2019-05-21 13:32:00.0 BILLINGS, Montana —The Bureau of Reclamation has announced that water levels at most Reclamation-managed reservoirs east of the continental divide in Montana are at or above average for this time of year. <P> “Most boat ramps will be usable at all Reclamation reservoirs east of the Continental Divide during the Memorial Day weekend,” said Montana Area Manager, Steve Davies. “As always, we strongly encourage water-based recreationists to check for the most up-to-date water level conditions at Reclamation’s website <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/gp/boat/index.html">https://www.usbr.gov/gp/boat/index.html</a> before heading to your favorite reservoir,” said Davies. <P> Current conditions at Reclamation facilities include: <P> <ul><li><b>Clark Canyon Reservoir</b> – Inflows to the reservoir are slightly below average for this time of year. The reservoir is about 1.5 feet below the top of the joint-use pool. Boaters will be able to launch at all locations around Clark Canyon Reservoir. Releases to the Beaverhead River are being maintained at about 400 cubic feet per second (cfs).</li> <P> <li><b>Canyon Ferry Reservoir</b> – Inflows to Canyon Ferry are above average for this time of year. The reservoir level is about 9 feet below the top of the joint-use pool and releases to the Missouri River are being maintained near 6,500 cfs.</li> <P> Due to Canyon Ferry Reservoir being suspect for aquatic invasive mussel larvae, only Yacht Basin, Kim’s Marina, Shannon, Goose Bay, Silos and Hellgate boat ramps are open to all boaters. All other ramps at the reservoir are only open to certified local boaters. The ramps open to all boaters either have a decontamination station assigned to them or are near in proximity. Decontamination stations are located at Reclamation’s Visitor Center on the north end of the reservoir, at the Silos boat ramp on the south end, and at Hellgate and Goose Bay, both on the east side of the reservoir. All watercraft leaving Canyon Ferry will be required to go through a decontamination station unless they are registered as a certified local boater. Certified local boaters traveling to another waterbody will also need to go through the decontamination station. More can be found at: <a href="http://cleandraindry.mt.gov/Watercraft-Inspections">cleananddry.mt.gov/Watercraft-Inspections</a>. <P> <li><b>Gibson Reservoir</b> – Inflows and reservoir level at Gibson Reservoir are near average for this time of year. The boat ramp at Gibson Reservoir is currently usable.</li> <P> <li><b>Lake Elwell (Tiber Reservoir)</b> – Inflows to Tiber Reservoir are above average for this time of year. The reservoir level is about 2 feet below the top of the joint-use pool. Releases to the Marias River are currently being maintained near 1,500 cfs.</li> <P> Due to Tiber Reservoir testing positive for aquatic invasive mussel larvae in 2016, only three boat ramps remain open to all watercrafts, Tiber Marina, VFW Campground and a new site at Willow Creek. All other ramps at the reservoir are only open to certified local boaters. All watercraft leaving Tiber Reservoir will be required to go through a decontamination station unless they are part of the certified local boater program. Certified local boaters traveling to another waterbody will also need to go through the decontamination station. More information can be found at: <a href="http://cleandraindry.mt.gov/Watercraft-Inspections">cleananddry.mt.gov/Watercraft-Inspections</a>. <li><b>Fresno Reservoir</b> – Inflows to Fresno Reservoir are below average for this time of year. The reservoir level is full, at the top of the joint-use pool. Releases to the Milk River are currently near 550 cfs. All boat ramps at Fresno are currently usable.</li> <P> <li><b>Nelson Reservoir</b> – Nelson Reservoir is full which is above average for this time of year. Boaters will be able to launch at all locations around Nelson Reservoir.</li> <P> <li><b>Bighorn Lake (Yellowtail Dam)</b> – The reservoir level is about 23 feet below the top of the joint-use pool and rising. Releases to the Bighorn River are being maintained above average, near 3,500 cfs. Boaters will be able to launch at OK-A-BEH and Barry’s Landing. Please check with the National Park Service for boat launching capabilities at Horseshoe Bend. For more information regarding recreation activities and boat launching at Bighorn Lake, recreationists are encouraged to contact the National Park Service at 406-666-3218.</li></ul> <P> Each year hundreds of lives are lost... thousands are injured... and millions of dollars of property damage occurs because of preventable recreational boating accidents on U.S. waterways. Too often recreation outings turn tragic. You — as a boat operator, passenger, or concerned individual — can make a difference. For more information visit <a href="http://www.uscgboating.org">www.uscgboating.org</a>. <P> <P> <P> <P> <P> <P> <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=66123 Reclamation reminds public on rules for camping and recreating on public lands
2019-05-21 10:21:00.0 BILLINGS, Montana – With the 2019 recreation season upon us, the Bureau of Reclamation would like to remind the public recreating on public lands administered by Reclamation, of rules for camping and boating at Tiber, Fresno, and Nelson Reservoirs. Reclamation asks the public to minimize impacts to natural resources and allow fellow visitors the same recreation experience by following these basic rules. <P> Most federally administered lands enforce a 14-day stay limit within a 30-day period for any camping. <P> Visitors to Reclamation lands must ensure that picnic and camp sites are free of trash and litter and be respectful of future visitors to the area by keeping a clean camp site <P> Visitors are also required to fully extinguish camp fires using a shovel and enough water to ensure all burning fuels are completely out. Check with your local land management office for existing fire restrictions before your camping trip. <P> Reclamation does not currently have any campgrounds that can be reserved within lands encompassing Tiber, Fresno, or Nelson Reservoirs. All campsites are on a first come, first served basis. Visitors may not attempt to reserve a campsite by leaving personal property at the site for any duration. Reclamation considers personal property left for more than a 24-hour period to be abandoned and can be removed or impounded. <P> Boaters coming to Tiber, Fresno, and Nelson Reservoirs are also reminded to prevent the infestation of aquatic invasive species (Quagga and Zebra mussels) by following the Clean, Drain, Dry guidelines before and after putting motorized and non-motorized watercraft to use. <P> Reclamation managers encourage the visiting public to enjoy their public lands and provide future visitors with the same quality outdoor experience. <P> For further questions regarding camping or recreating on Tiber, Fresno, and Nelson Reservoirs, please contact the Marias/Milk Rivers Division field office at (406) 759-7055, or visit Reclamation’s website at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/gp/mtao/">https://www.usbr.gov/gp/mtao/</a>. <P> <P> <P> <P> <P> <P> <P> <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=66103 Interior and states sign historic drought agreements to protect Colorado River
2019-05-20 17:30:00.0 BOULDER CITY, NEV. – The Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation and representatives from all seven Colorado River Basin states gathered today and signed completed drought contingency plans for the Upper and Lower Colorado River basins. These completed plans are designed to reduce risks from ongoing drought and protect the single most important water resource in the western United States. <P> “This is an historic accomplishment for the Colorado River Basin. Adopting consensus-based drought contingency plans represents the best path toward safeguarding the single most important water resource in the western United States,” said Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman. “These agreements represent tremendous collaboration, coordination and compromise from each basin state, American Indian tribes, and even the nation of Mexico.” <P> In addition to the voluntary reductions and other measures to which the basin states agreed, Mexico has also agreed to participate in additional measures to protect the Colorado River Basin. Under a 2017 agreement, Minute 323 to the 1944 U.S. – Mexico Water Treaty, Mexico agreed to implement a Binational Water Scarcity Contingency Plan but only after the United States adopted the DCP. <P> The Colorado River, with its system of reservoirs and water conveyance infrastructure, supplies water for more than 40 million people and nearly 5.5 million acres of farmland across the western United States and Mexico. The reservoirs along the river have performed well—ensuring reliable and consistent water deliveries through even the driest years. But, after 20 years of drought, those reservoirs are showing increasing strain; Lake Powell and Lake Mead, the two largest reservoirs on the system and in the United States, are only 39% and 41% full respectively. And, while the basin experienced above-average snowpack in 2019, the total system storage across the basin began the water year at just 47% full. <P> “The urgency for action in the basin is real, and I applaud all of the parties across the seven states and Mexico for coming together and reaching agreement to protect the Colorado River,” said Burman. “I’m glad to finally say that ‘done’ is done.” <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=66083 Reclamation further reduces McKay Dam releases
2019-05-20 07:54:00.0 PENDLETON, Ore.–While a flood watch remains in effect until Monday, May 20, updated weather forecasts have prompted the Bureau of Reclamation to decrease releases this morning to 100 cubic feet per second out of McKay Dam. <P> The Bureau of Reclamation, in coordination with the National Weather Service, will continue to closely monitor weather conditions; however, the forecasted amount of rainfall over the next several days has continued to decrease over the weekend. <P> "With the continued downgrade in the amount of forecasted rainfall, and the normal storage space available, we will begin refilling the reservoir with the incoming rainfall," said Sean Kimbrel, Umatilla Field Office manager. <P> McKay Reservoir is currently at 97% of normal capacity. Waters stored in the normal capacity are authorized to provide water supply for irrigation, and fish and wildlife purposes during the dry summer months; however, an additional 6,000 acre-feet of storage are available for flood control purposes. The additional 6,000 af of storage is not shown on Reclamation’s Hydromet site. <P> Be aware that weather forecasts can be uncertain and change over time. Releases may increase or decrease if forecasted precipitation amounts are different than predicted. <P> For real-time McKay Creek flow information from McKay Dam, visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/rtgraph.html?list=mcko%20q&daily=mcko%20qd">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/rtgraph.html?list=mcko%20q&daily=mcko%20qd</a>. <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=66072 Reclamation ramps down flows out of McKay Dam
2019-05-18 14:53:00.0 PENDLETON, Ore. – Based on observed inflows overnight and updated weather forecasts, the Bureau of Reclamation will gradually decrease releases to 500 cubic feet per second out of McKay Dam by noon local time. <P> Significant rainfall in the Pendleton area is predicted to continue over the weekend and into the early week; therefore, the Bureau of Reclamation, in coordination with the National Weather Service, will continue to closely monitor weather conditions that inform the reservoir operations at McKay Dam and Reservoir. <P> On May 17, 2019, the releases of 1,200 cfs were implemented to capture anticipated high inflows to the reservoir overnight, and to create additional space in the reservoir in preparation for the continued pattern of significant rainfall that is forecasted through Tuesday. <P> “We remain committed to operating McKay Dam prudently to protect the public, and we’ll continue to communicate as predicted weather patterns affect the area,” said Sean Kimbrel, Umatilla Field Office manager. <P> Reclamation and local officials are advising the public to avoid the banks along McKay Creek. The water is cold and can be deep and fast in various locations. Additionally, changes in flows can compromise bank stability. A change in pressure associated with lower flows can allow banks that are in a weakened state to give way. <P> McKay Reservoir is currently at 97% of normal capacity. Waters stored in the normal capacity are authorized to provide water supply for irrigation, and fish and wildlife purposes during the dry summer months; however, an additional 6,000 acre-feet of storage are available for flood control purposes. The additional 6,000 af of storage is not shown on Reclamation’s Hydromet site. <P> Weather forecasts can be uncertain and change over time. Releases may increase or decrease if forecasted precipitation amounts are different than predicted. Reclamation and the National Weather Service will continue to closely monitor conditions during this rain event. The facility is operating as expected, and the dam is safe. <P> For real-time McKay Creek flow information from McKay Dam, visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/rtgraph.html?list=mcko%20q&daily=mcko%20qd">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/rtgraph.html?list=mcko%20q&daily=mcko%20qd</a>. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=66071 Reclamation increases flows out of McKay Dam
2019-05-17 14:07:00.0 PENDLETON, Ore. – With the National Weather Service Flood Watch in effect for the Pendleton area and significant rainfall expected over the weekend, the Bureau of Reclamation, in coordination with the National Weather Service, is closely monitoring weather conditions that inform the reservoir operations at McKay Dam and Reservoir. <P> On May 16, 2019, the Bureau of Reclamation increased releases to 500 cubic feet per second out of McKay Dam. These releases were coordinated with the downstream community with the intent of creating more storage space to accommodate incoming flows and to manage flood risk. The facility is operating as expected, and the dam is safe. <P> Releases will increase throughout today to 1,200 cfs by 3:00 pm in an effort to save space in the reservoir. As additional precipitation enters the system, flows may need to be adjusted over the weekend. Reclamation will continue to work closely with Umatilla County and City of Pendleton as conditions develop over the next few days. <P> Reclamation officials are advising the public to be aware of the potential danger associated with McKay Creek flows. The water is cold and can be deep and fast in various locations. Extreme caution should be used near the river banks. <P> “We take our responsibility to safely operate our facility seriously, and are committed to remaining open and transparent,” said Umatilla Field Office Manager Sean Kimbrel. “We are in close coordination with Umatilla County, the City of Pendleton, and the National Weather Service.” McKay Reservoir is nearing a normal capacity of 65,500 acre-feet; however, an additional 6,000 af of storage is available for flood control purposes. The additional 6,000 af of storage is not shown on Reclamation’s Hydromet site. <P> Weather forecasts can be uncertain and change over time. Reclamation and the National Weather Service will continue to closely monitor conditions during this rain event. For real-time McKay Creek flow information from McKay Dam, visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/rtgraph.html?list=mcko%20q&daily=mcko%20qd">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/rtgraph.html?list=mcko%20q&daily=mcko%20qd</a>. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=66070 Interior to host signing ceremony and media availability for Colorado River Drought Contingency Plans
2019-05-17 12:12:00.0 BOULDER CITY, NEV. - The Department of the Interior and Bureau of Reclamation invite members of the press to a media availability and signing ceremony for the Colorado River Drought Contingency Plans at the iconic Hoover Dam on May 20. These completed plans are an important step toward reducing risk from ongoing drought in the Colorado River Basin and protecting the river’s water resources for riparian areas, agriculture, and more than 40 million people in the United States and Mexico who depend on it. <P> What: Media availability to discuss completed Colorado River Drought Contingency Plans <P> Who: Department of the Interior Assistant Secretary for Water and Science Dr. Tim Petty Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman Representatives from Colorado River Basin states <P> Where: Hoover Dam Boulder City, Nev. <P> When: Monday, May 20, 2019 Media availability to begin at 4:30 p.m. PDT (Spillway House) DCP signing ceremony to begin at 5:30 p.m. PDT (Visitor Center Observation Deck) <P> Members of the press wishing to attend must RSVP no later than 11:00 a.m. on Monday, May 20 to Patti Aaron (paaron@usbr.gov) or Marlon Duke (mduke@usbr.gov). <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=66043 Reclamation will use innovative methods to control non-native plants at sites in southwest Colorado
2019-05-16 10:00:00.0 DURANGO, COLO. - The Bureau of Reclamation, in collaboration with the Palisade Insectary and Colorado Parks and Wildlife, will apply an innovative and environmentally conscious method to control weeds this spring in wetland areas at Navajo State Park in Colorado and Simon Draw Wildlife Area in Montezuma County, Colorado. The agencies will release Russian knapweed stem gall wasps as part of an effort to control the spread and vigor of Russian knapweed, a noxious weed in Colorado harmful to native plants and wildlife. The gall wasps will only impact Russian knapweed and will not affect humans, livestock or other plant species. <P> “This approach offers an effective and low-cost complement to chemical and mechanical control of Russian knapweed. This is especially important in biologically sensitive areas, such as the wetland areas where gall wasp releases are planned,” said Ed Warner, Reclamation’s Western Colorado Area Office Manager. “These wetlands are home to a diverse number of wildlife species, including the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse.” <P> Russian knapweed is an aggressive, non-native, deep rooted perennial plant that spreads through seeds and creeping horizontal roots. Left unmanaged, Russian knapweed displaces native and desirable plant species. In addition to impacting wildlife habitat, Russian knapweed may cause neurological disorders in horses if consumed. <P> The gall wasp causes the formation of galls or abnormal growths along the stem of the Russian knapweed, resulting in nutrient diversion from flowers, seeds and growth. This significantly reduces the ability of the invasive weeds to thrive and spread. The gall wasps require little management after release, and they can easily move around an infestation through flight, wind, or by catching a ride on wildlife. <P> Gall wasps are an incredibly valuable tool for management of Russian knapweed. Impacts from the gall wasp can be seen relatively rapidly as evidenced by trials at other sites conducted by the Palisade Insectary. In as little as three growing seasons, every Russian knapweed stem at the research site was impacted and the overall vigor of the knapweed patch was diminished. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=66023 Reclamation hosting Jackson Lake Dam operations information meeting
2019-05-15 10:40:00.0 HEYBURN, Idaho – The Bureau of Reclamation will host a meeting to present streamflow forecasts and projected reservoir operations for Jackson Lake Dam and other Snake River reservoirs on May 23. The meeting will be held at the 49er Inn conference room, 330 W. Pearl Street, Jackson, Wyoming at 5:30 p.m. <P> The meeting will focus primarily on the runoff forecast for the Snake River near Heise, Idaho, water supply outlook, river flow management and snowpack conditions. Currently, the runoff forecast is 107% of average, and the current storage in Jackson Lake is at 77% of capacity. The lake is expected to fill in June, with moderate demand for storage releases over the summer. <P> With the current snowpack, there may be potential for flooding along the Snake River in Teton County due to possible significant inflows from tributaries. The tributaries also may experience high flows and flood flows. Caution is advised in these areas during the snowmelt season. Flood operations are determined by a forecast coordinated with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Reclamation for the Snake River above Heise. Flooding potential will be discussed in the meeting. <P> The meeting facility is accessible to people with disabilities. Contact Darrin Fredrickson at (208) 678-0461, ext. 17, TTY 711, to request sign language interpretation for the hearing impaired or other auxiliary aids. <P> Current river and reservoir data are available at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/uppersnake/">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/uppersnake/</a>. <P> For more information about Reclamation programs, please visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/snakeriver/index.html">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/snakeriver/index.html</a>. <P> Jackson Lake Dam is located on the Snake River in Grand Teton National Park near Moran, Wyoming. The dam is part of the Minidoka Project and was originally constructed in 1911. Parts of the dam were later replaced in 1989 under the authority of Reclamation’s Safety of Dams Act. <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=66003 Reclamation selects Jeff Hawk as Public Affairs Officer for the Mid-Pacific Region
2019-05-14 12:47:00.0 SACRAMENTO, Calif. – The Bureau of Reclamation has announced the selection of Jeff Hawk as the Mid-Pacific Region’s Public Affairs Officer. Hawk will manage public affairs, public involvement, public education programs, internal communications, media and congressional relations. <P> “I am pleased to announce Jeff as our new Public Affairs Officer,” said Mid-Pacific Regional Director Ernest Conant. “His experience has taken him across the world, and we look forward to his leadership in this critical position.” <P> Hawk served most recently as the Public Affairs Officer in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District, where he managed a variety of crucial projects and lead a team of public affairs specialists during federal disaster response efforts. He has served in multiple special assignment positions, including with the U.S. Forces-Afghanistan in Kabul. Prior to that, he worked with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento and Detroit districts. <P> Hawk graduated from Ohio University and brings extensive training in emergency management and from the Department of Defense Information School. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps, where he worked as a combat correspondent. <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=65983 Reclamation hosting water safety and life jacket exchange day at New Melones Lake
2019-05-13 14:13:00.0 SONORA, Calif. – The Bureau of Reclamation will kick off summer with a water safety and life jacket exchange day at New Melones Lake on May 18. The event will last from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. outside the New Melones Lake Visitor Center and Museum. <P> Park rangers will provide water safety information, conduct activities and demonstrate the proper wearing of life jackets. New life jackets will be available in exchange for old life jackets for the first 100 participants. <P> “This partnership with California Division of Boating and Waterways is an opportunity to promote water safety in an area known for its water recreation activities,” said New Melones Supervisory Park Ranger Lee Lang. <P> The Motherlode area is renowned for its lakes and rivers. With this year’s above-average snowfall, Reclamation wants to ensure all visitors have a fun and safe recreation season. <P> For more information please contact Park Ranger Mike McGraw at 209-536-9094 ext. 233 or <a href="mailto:mmcgraw@usbr.gov">mmcgraw@usbr.gov</a> or visit the New Melones Lake website at&nbsp;<u><a href="https://www.usbr.gov/mp/ccao/newmelones/index.html">https://www.usbr.gov/mp/ccao/newmelones/index.html</a></u> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=65963 Reclamation releases final environmental document for El Dorado County Water Agency long-term water service contract
2019-05-13 10:45:00.0 FOLSOM, Calif. – The Bureau of Reclamation has issued the final environmental impact statement for the El Dorado County Water Agency long-term water service contract. The contract will provide water to serve existing and future municipal and industrial water needs in El Dorado County. <P> Up to 15,000 acre-feet annually of Central Valley Project municipal and industrial water will be available to EDCWA for diversion from Folsom Reservoir, or from an exchange on the American River upstream from Folsom Reservoir under this new contract. This contract will also address the need for new water supply for El Dorado County. <P> The final environmental impact statement was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, and is available at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/mp/nepa/nepa_project_details.php?Project_ID=26">https://www.usbr.gov/mp/nepa/nepa_project_details.php?Project_ID=26</a></p> For additional information, contact Brad Hubbard at <a href="mailto:bhubbard@usbr.gov">bhubbard@usbr.gov</a> or 916-537-7041 (TTY 800-877-8339). <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=65953 Reclamation hosting Boca Dam media field event
2019-05-10 15:17:00.0 TRUCKEE, Calif. &ndash; The Bureau of Reclamation will host a media field event at Boca Dam May 17 from 11 a.m. to noon. Reclamation and U.S. Forest Service officials will explain the ongoing upgrades taking place at the dam, outline safety measures for visitors and onsite employees and discuss recreation solutions for accommodating both construction and visitor access. <p>&nbsp;<strong>WHO: </strong></p> <ul> <li>Reclamation Construction Engineer Richard Welsh</li> <li>Reclamation Project Resident Engineer Kyle Hughes</li> <li>Acting Tahoe National Forest District Ranger Scott Conway</li> </ul> <p><strong>WHAT: </strong>Reclamation began modifying Boca Dam earlier this month in order to enable the dam to better resist the impacts of potential earthquakes. The project will temporarily stop during the 2019-2020 winter and end in October 2020.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>WHERE: </strong>Boca Dam is located six miles northeast of Truckee.</p> <p><strong>VISUALS:</strong> Heavy equipment, such as dozers, excavators, loaders, and haul trucks will be on site.</p> <p>&nbsp;<strong>BOCA DAM FAST FACTS: </strong></p> <ul> <li>Height is 116 feet, length is 1,630 feet.</li> <li>Capacity of 40,000 acre-feet (1 acre-foot is the total amount of water that would cover 1 acre with 1-foot deep; think about the size of a football field or the amount of water a family of four uses annually).</li> <li>Regulates the Little Truckee River.</li> <li>Provides water for irrigation, recreation, fish and wildlife benefits, and municipal and industrial uses in Truckee Meadows.</li> <li>Owned by Reclamation.</li> <li>Operated by Washoe County Water Conservation District.</li> <li>Completed in 1939.</li> </ul> <p><strong><u>DRIVING DIRECTIONS</u></strong><strong>:</strong> From Reno on I-80 W, take exit 194 for Hirschdale Road; turn left on Hirschdale Road; Hirschdale Road turns slightly right and becomes Stampede Meadows Road. From Sacramento on I-80 E, take exit 194 for Hirschdale Road; turn left on Hirschdale Road; Hirschdale Road turns slightly right and becomes Stampede Meadows Road.</p> <p><strong><u>ADDITIONAL INFORMATION</u></strong><strong>:</strong> Visit the project website at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/mp/sod/projects/boca/">www.usbr.gov/mp/sod/projects/boca</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><u>QUESTIONS</u></strong><strong>:</strong> Direct project related questions to the Mid-Pacific Construction Office at 530-892-6262 (TTY 800-877-8339) or <a href="mailto:sha-wco-cfiles@usbr.gov">sha-wco-cfiles@usbr.gov</a>. <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=65984 Reclamation issues snowmelt forecast and expected operations for North Platte River Basin
2019-05-10 07:30:00.0 MILLS, Wyoming - The Wyoming Area Office of the Bureau of Reclamation in Mills, Wyoming, has prepared the May snowmelt runoff forecasts and operating plans for the North Platte River Basin. <P> “Based on this month’s projection of above average runoff, we expect the North Platte Basin water contractors will have a full water supply this year," said Wyoming Area Manager, Carlie Ronca. <P> The May forecasts indicate the spring snowmelt runoff will be above average. Total April through July runoff in the North Platte River Basin above Glendo Dam is expected to be 1,004,000 acre-feet (af) which is 111% of the 30-year average. Approximately 228,500 af of the forecast volume was accumulated during April, which is 151% of the April average. <P> As of April 30, storage content in the North Platte Reservoirs amounts to 1,822,745 af, which is 110% of the 30-year average. The total conservation storage capacity of the North Platte Reservoir System is approximately 2.8 million af. <P> Current releases are 2,700 cubic feet per second (cfs) from Seminoe Reservoir through the Miracle Mile, 500 cfs out of Gray Reef Reservoir, and 930 cfs out of Guernsey Reservoir. Based on current projections for the months of May, June, and July, the releases out of Seminoe Reservoir are not expected to exceed 3,000 cfs, while flows out of Gray Reef are expected to be in the range of approximately 500 to 2,500 cfs. Releases from Guernsey will be in the 2,900 to 5,200 cfs range. Pathfinder Reservoir is not expected to spill this spring. <P> <P>