Newsroom Channel http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom Reclamation Newsroom Channel https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=70945 Updated—Reclamation hosting Jackson Lake Dam operations information meeting
HEYBURN, Idaho – The Bureau of Reclamation will hold an informational meeting to present streamflow forecasts and projected reservoir operations for Jackson Lake Dam and other Snake River reservoirs on May 21 at 5:30 p.m. The meeting was previously scheduled to be held in person in Jackson, Wyo., but will now only be held through remote attendance. <P> Remote attendance is available by Internet or phone using the information below: <a href="https://bor.webex.com/webappng/sites/bor/meeting/download/d50ca184c89141099b95420b4b4d999d?siteurl=bor&MTID=mbde154743558398fadc444d3a5687efc">https://bor.webex.com/webappng/sites/bor/meeting/download/d50ca184c89141099b95420b4b4d999d?siteurl=bor&MTID=mbde154743558398fadc444d3a5687efc</a> <P> Meeting number access code: 909 391 945 <P> Meeting password: wNFmvJJW293 <P> Join by phone: 1-415-527-5035 <P> The meeting will focus primarily on the runoff forecast for the Snake River near Heise, Idaho, water supply outlook, river flow management and snowpack conditions. Currently, the runoff forecast is 105% of average, and the current storage in Jackson Lake is at 77% of capacity. The lake is expected to fill in June, with moderate demand for storage releases over the summer. <P> With the current snowpack, there may be potential for flooding along the Snake River in Teton County due to possible significant inflows from tributaries. The tributaries also may experience high flows and flood flows. Caution is advised in these areas during the snowmelt season. Flood operations are determined by a forecast coordinated with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Reclamation for the Snake River above Heise. Flooding potential will be discussed in the meeting. <P> The meeting facility is accessible to people with disabilities. Contact Darrin Fredrickson at (208) 678-0461, ext. 17, TTY 711, to request sign language interpretation for the hearing impaired or other auxiliary aids. <P> Current river and reservoir data are available at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/uppersnake/">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/uppersnake/</a>. <P> For more information about Reclamation programs, please visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/snakeriver/index.html">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/snakeriver/index.html</a>. <P> Jackson Lake Dam is located on the Snake River in Grand Teton National Park near Moran, Wyo. The dam is part of the Minidoka Project and was originally constructed in 1911. Parts of the dam were later replaced in 1989 under the authority of Reclamation’s Safety of Dams Act. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=70923 Reclamation hosting Jackson Lake Dam operations information meeting
HEYBURN, Idaho – The Bureau of Reclamation will host an informational meeting to present streamflow forecasts and projected reservoir operations for Jackson Lake Dam and other Snake River reservoirs on May 21. The meeting will be held at the Teton County Public Library, 125 Virginian Lane, Jackson, Wyo., at 5:30 p.m. <P> Remote attendance is available by Internet or phone using the information below: <a href="https://bor.webex.com/webappng/sites/bor/meeting/download/d50ca184c89141099b95420b4b4d999d?siteurl=bor&MTID=mbde154743558398fadc444d3a5687efc">https://bor.webex.com/webappng/sites/bor/meeting/download/d50ca184c89141099b95420b4b4d999d?siteurl=bor&MTID=mbde154743558398fadc444d3a5687efc</a> <P> Meeting number access code: 909 391 945 <P> Meeting password: wNFmvJJW293 <P> Join by phone: 1-415-527-5035 <P> The meeting will focus primarily on the runoff forecast for the Snake River near Heise, Idaho, water supply outlook, river flow management and snowpack conditions. Currently, the runoff forecast is 105% of average, and the current storage in Jackson Lake is at 77% of capacity. The lake is expected to fill in June, with moderate demand for storage releases over the summer. <P> With the current snowpack, there may be potential for flooding along the Snake River in Teton County due to possible significant inflows from tributaries. The tributaries also may experience high flows and flood flows. Caution is advised in these areas during the snowmelt season. Flood operations are determined by a forecast coordinated with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Reclamation for the Snake River above Heise. Flooding potential will be discussed in the meeting. <P> The meeting facility is accessible to people with disabilities. Contact Darrin Fredrickson at (208) 678-0461, ext. 17, TTY 711, to request sign language interpretation for the hearing impaired or other auxiliary aids. <P> Current river and reservoir data are available at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/uppersnake/">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/uppersnake/</a>. <P> For more information about Reclamation programs, please visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/snakeriver/index.html">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/snakeriver/index.html</a>. <P> Jackson Lake Dam is located on the Snake River in Grand Teton National Park near Moran, Wyo. The dam is part of the Minidoka Project and was originally constructed in 1911. Parts of the dam were later replaced in 1989 under the authority of Reclamation’s Safety of Dams Act. <P> <P> <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=70803 Reclamation announces Yakima basin water supply—May forecast
YAKIMA, Wash. – The Bureau of Reclamation’s May 2020 Total Water Supply Available (TWSA) forecast for the Yakima basin indicates the water supply will fully satisfy senior water rights, while the junior water rights will be limited to an estimated 91% of their full entitlements this irrigation season. <P> “March and April were very dry throughout the basin, with only 45% of average system precipitation, the fourth lowest in the 109 years of record,” said Chuck Garner, Yakima Project River Operations supervisor. “The Yakima basin reservoir storage is 72% full, which is 98% of average. The snowpack is 76% of average.” <P> Reclamation manages the water in the five Yakima Project storage reservoirs, along with the basin’s unregulated inflows to fulfill water rights, water contracts and instream flow obligations. Water shortages in the basin are shared equally by the junior water rights, which represent over half of the water rights in the basin. <P> Specific water-delivery levels, such as water rights allocations and streamflow targets, will be set, normally in June, when the Yakima system requires reservoir storage releases to meet irrigation diversions and river flows. Reclamation will provide an updated water supply forecast and water allocation each month—at least through July—using the latest data to reflect changing conditions as they develop. <P> The May forecast is based on flows, precipitation, snowpack and reservoir storage as of May 1, along with estimates of future precipitation and river flows. Other future weather conditions that determine the timing of the runoff and the demand for water also are critical in determining streamflows, prorations and the extent to which the reservoirs fill. <P> “Our forecasts assume close to normal conditions going forward. When it is this dry in the spring, the water supply will drop,” says Garner. “We are grateful that, despite the dry conditions, the snow and reservoir storage appear adequate to meet normal demands, but we must manage the water carefully.” <P> For more information, visit Reclamation’s website at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/yakima">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/yakima</a>. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=70643 Reclamation seeks public comment on hatchery infrastructure improvements
LEAVENWORTH, Wash. – The Bureau of Reclamation is seeking comment on the rehabilitation, replacement and modernization of the Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery Surface Water Intake Fish Screens and Fish Passage Project. <P> The LNFH intake facility on Icicle Creek that supplies fresh water to the hatchery is deteriorating due to age and needs to comply with National Marine Fisheries Service current fish screening and fish passage criteria. The purpose of the project is to minimize the impacts to fish listed under the Endangered Species Act by improving fish passage and providing safe, efficient and reliable delivery of the hatchery’s surface water rights from Icicle Creek. <P> “This hatchery plays a vital role in the continued success of the Leavenworth Fisheries Complex to provide for sport, tribal, and commercial fisheries in the Pacific Northwest,” said Dawn Wiedmeier, Reclamation’s Columbia-Cascades area manager. <P> The hatchery is one of three mitigation hatcheries established by the Grand Coulee Fish Maintenance Project to compensate for anadromous fish losses above Grand Coulee Dam. It is operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and funded by Reclamation and Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery raises and releases 1.2 million spring chinook salmon smolts annually into Icicle Creek. <P> Reclamation is preparing an environmental impact statement on the LNFH Surface Water Intake Fish Screens and Fish Passage Project. Reclamation will be gathering information from other agencies, interested parties and the public on a range of possible alternatives to modernize this hatchery’s water intake, fish screening and fish passage system. The public will have the opportunity to participate in the scoping process and provide input through a web-based virtual meeting room from April 24, 2020 to May 26, 2020. The virtual “meeting” will be accessible at <a href="https://virtualpublicmeeting.com/leavenworth-swisp-eis">https://virtualpublicmeeting.com/leavenworth-swisp-eis</a>. The public can also participate in a teleconference on May 18, 2020, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. PDT. Subject matter experts will be available to answer any questions attendees may have about the project. <P> Comments must be submitted by close of business on May 26, 2020, in the web-based virtual meeting room, by email to <a href="mailto:BOR-SHA-PNRLSWISP@usbr.gov">BOR-SHA-PNRLSWISP@usbr.gov</a> or by U.S. mail. If submitting an email, please indicate “SWISP Scoping Comments” in the email subject line. To submit written comments, please contact Mr. Jason Sutter, EIS Team Lead, Bureau of Reclamation, Columbia–Pacific Northwest Regional Office, 1150 N. Curtis Road, Boise, ID 83706. More information can be found on the SWISP official website: <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/programs/leavenworth/swisp/index.html">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/programs/leavenworth/swisp/index.html</a>. <P> <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=70324 Reclamation announces Yakima basin water supply – April forecast
YAKIMA, Wash. – The Bureau of Reclamation’s April 2020 Total Water Supply Available forecast for the Yakima basin indicates the water supply will fully satisfy senior water rights, while the junior water rights will be limited to an estimated 96% of their full entitlements this irrigation season. <P> “March precipitation, at 42% of normal, fell far short of expectations. Snowpack, as percent of average, has declined about 5% since March 1. The five reservoirs are just over 62% full and filled about as expected in March,” said Chuck Garner, Yakima Project River Operations supervisor. “The Yakima basin reservoir storage is currently 102% of average, and the snowpack is 95% of average.” <P> Reclamation manages the water in the five Yakima Project storage reservoirs, along with the basin’s unregulated inflows to fulfill water rights, water contracts and instream flow obligations. Water shortages in the basin are shared equally by the junior water rights, which represent over half of the water rights in the basin. <P> Specific water-delivery levels, such as water rights allocations and streamflow targets, will be set normally in June, when the Yakima system requires reservoir storage releases to meet irrigation diversions and river flows. Reclamation will provide an updated water supply forecast and water allocation monthly—at least through July—using the latest data each month to reflect any changing conditions as they develop. <P> The April forecast is based on flows, precipitation, snowpack, and reservoir storage as of April 1, along with estimates of future precipitation and river flows. Other future weather conditions that determine the timing of the runoff and the demand for water also are critical in determining streamflows, prorations and the extent to which the reservoirs fill. <P> “We still have several key months ahead of us that can have a big influence on the ultimate water supply this summer,” says Garner. <P> For more information, visit Reclamation’s website at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/yakima">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/yakima</a>. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=70083 Grand Coulee Dam Visitor Center temporarily closed, tours delayed
GRAND COULEE, Wash. – Today, the Bureau of Reclamation temporarily closed public visitation to the Grand Coulee Dam Visitor Center in support of the recommended guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tours of the dam were set to begin April 1, 2020, but will be delayed until further notice. The health and safety of the public and our employees is our number one priority. <P> Water deliveries and powerplant operations will continue without interruption. Mission essential functions, such as security and law enforcement, will continue. <P> Check our website for updates at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/pn/grandcoulee">www.usbr.gov/pn/grandcoulee</a> or call 509-633-9507. <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=69723 Reclamation announces Yakima basin water supply – March forecast
YAKIMA, Wash. – The Bureau of Reclamation’s March 2020 Total Water Supply Available forecast for the Yakima basin indicates the water supply will satisfy senior and junior water rights this irrigation season. <P> “The precipitation this season was very poor in November and early December but has been strong since late December and is currently at 115% of average for the water year,” said Chuck Garner, Yakima Project River Operations supervisor. “The precipitation has helped increase our reservoirs from 53% of average in October to 107% in March. The mountain snowpack that feeds our rivers and reservoirs is currently near 100% of average, with below average amounts in the lower elevations and near or above average amounts up high.” <P> Reclamation manages the water in the five Yakima Project storage reservoirs, along with the basin’s unregulated inflows to fulfill water rights, water contracts and instream flow obligations. Water shortages in the basin are shared equally by the junior water rights, which represent over half of the water rights in the basin. <P> Reclamation will provide an updated water supply forecast monthly—at least through July—using the latest data each month to reflect any changing conditions as they develop. <P> The March forecast is based on flows, precipitation, snowpack, and reservoir storage as of March 1, along with estimates of future precipitation and river flows. Other future weather conditions that determine the timing of the runoff and the demand for water also are critical in determining streamflows, prorations and the extent to which the reservoirs fill. <P> “We still have several key months ahead of us that can have a big influence on the ultimate water supply this summer,” says Garner. <P> For more information, visit Reclamation’s website at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/yakima">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/yakima</a>. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=69623 Reclamation plans to increase flows out of McKay Dam March 9–10
PENDLETON, Ore. – On March 9, 2020, the Bureau of Reclamation, in close coordination with the City of Pendleton and Umatilla County officials, plans to increase releases to 200 cubic feet per second out of McKay Dam. On March 10, 2020, Reclamation will incrementally increase releases up to 1,200 cfs for several hours, then gradually decrease flows to minimum releases on March 11. <P> The intent of the planned increase in releases is to test the downstream safe channel capacity now that the City of Pendleton has completed gravel removal work in McKay Creek. McKay Dam is operating as expected, and the dam is safe. <P> “We appreciate the opportunity to further our work with local partners through this exercise,” said Umatilla Field Office Manager Sean Kimbrel. “In partnership with the National Weather Service, we will continue to monitor the spring weather conditions that inform reservoir operations at McKay Dam and will further the history of collaboration with the City of Pendleton and Umatilla County.” <P> Reclamation, City of Pendleton, and Umatilla County officials are advising the public to be aware of the potential danger associated with high flows in McKay Creek. Spring flow releases from McKay Dam can vary depending on available storage and forecasted weather conditions. Residents are reminded that the water is cold and can be deep and fast in various locations. Extreme caution should be used near the riverbanks. <P> In coordination with the National Weather Service, Reclamation will continue to closely monitor weather conditions that inform the reservoir operations and releases at McKay Dam and Reservoir. Weather forecasts can be uncertain and change over time. Additionally, Reclamation will continue to work closely with Umatilla County and City of Pendleton to provide advance notification during situations when high flows need to be released out of McKay Dam. <P> Currently, McKay reservoir is at approximately 75 percent of normal capacity. A full supply of irrigation water out of McKay Reservoir is anticipated this summer. McKay Reservoir has a normal capacity of 65,500 acre-feet; however, an additional 6,000 acre-feet of storage is available for flood control purposes. <P> For real-time McKay Creek flow information from McKay Dam, visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/rtgraph.html?list=mcko%20q&daily=mcko%20qd">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/rtgraph.html?list=mcko%20q&daily=mcko%20qd</a>. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=69404 Reclamation welcomes Talmadge Oxford as area manager for Columbia-Cascades Area Office
BOISE, Idaho – The Bureau of Reclamation announces Talmadge Oxford as area manager for the Columbia-Cascades Area Office in Interior Region 9: Columbia Pacific Northwest. Headquartered in Yakima, Wash., Oxford will oversee major field offices in Yakima and Ephrata, Wash., and Bend and Hermiston, Ore. He will manage Reclamation projects in Washington State, northern Idaho and western Montana, as well as central and western Oregon. <P> “Talmadge’s diverse background will bring new perspectives as we continue to make progress in water and power management and delivery in this basin,” said Regional Director Lorri Gray. <P> Prior to his new assignment, Oxford served as Interior Region 7: Upper Colorado Basin Power Area Office Manager. While there, he oversaw the operation and maintenance of four field offices associated with Colorado River Storage Project hydroelectric facilities: the Glen Canyon Field Division, Page, Ariz.; the Curecanti Field Division, Montrose, Colo.; the Flaming Gorge Field Division, Dutch John, Utah; and Elephant Butte Field Division in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico. <P> A native of Dallas, Texas, Oxford began his Reclamation career in 2006 and has served in Boulder City, Nev.; Denver, Colo., and Salt Lake City, Utah. His previous assignments included Hoover Dam Operations Director, Program Manager, and Deputy Power Manager. <P> “The Columbia-Cascades Area Office is doing great things to help fulfill Reclamation’s mission as water managers in the West,” Oxford said. “I look forward to working with our stakeholders to plan for future water needs through the most efficient uses of water resources,” he added. <P> Oxford brings over 36 years of experience to the Columbia–Pacific Northwest Region. He will begin serving in his new role in March. <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=69283 Reclamation welcomes Roland Springer as deputy regional director in Interior Region 9, Columbia–Pacific Northwest Region
BOISE, Idaho – The Bureau of Reclamation announces Roland Springer as the deputy regional director for natural resources in its Columbia–Pacific Northwest Region. As deputy regional director, Springer will oversee programs related to basin-wide water management and operations, natural resources, and environmental services and related programs. <P> “Roland’s proactive approach to water management challenges will help us continue to promote reliable water supply and delivery in the West,” said Regional Director Lorri Gray. “I look forward to the wealth of experience he will bring to our regional leadership team.” <P> Prior to his new assignment, Springer served as Reclamation’s Snake River area manager, where he oversaw Reclamation facilities and activities throughout the Snake River basin, from eastern Oregon through western Wyoming. While in the Snake River Area Office, Springer oversaw completion of the new Minidoka Dam Spillway, served as the team lead on agency-wide safety efforts, and led feasibility efforts for new storage in the Boise River basin. <P> A native of Salt Lake City, Utah, he began his Reclamation career in 1999 and has served in Idaho; Salt Lake City; Boulder City, Nevada; and Washington, D.C. His previous assignments included water supply forecaster, Lower Colorado Region liaison in the Commissioner’s office, Congressional staffer, and field manager. Springer also established multi-state Colorado River water management agreements during his tenure in the LC Region. Additionally, he spent time as a consulting water resources engineer and a management consultant to federal agency leaders. <P> “The Columbia–Pacific Northwest Region plays a vital role in managing water in the West, and I’m excited to join regional efforts to help fulfill this important mission,” said Springer. <P> Springer holds civil engineering and MBA degrees from MIT and Cornell University, and is a Registered Professional Engineer in Utah as well as a Project Management Professional. Roland and his family make their home in Boise, Idaho. He will begin serving in his new role in February. <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=67643 Reclamation changes flows in Yakima basin for salmon spawning
YAKIMA, Wash. – To aid in successful spawning and incubation of Chinook salmon eggs and to improve winter reservoir storage in the Yakima basin, the Bureau of Reclamation will begin what is referred to as its annual “flip-flop” operation in early September. This means flows out of Keechelus and Cle Elum reservoirs in the upper Yakima River basin will be gradually reduced, while flows from Kachess and Rimrock reservoirs will be increased. This operation will affect flows in the Tieton and Naches rivers, and Kachess Reservoir flows into Lake Easton in the upper basin. In other words, flows from these facilities will transition, or “flip-flop.” <P> As part of the process, on or about Sept. 3, Reclamation will begin diverting water down the Kittitas Reclamation District’s Spillway 1146 into the Yakima River near Thorp. Buoys will be in place from Sept. 3 or 4 until soon after the flow from Spillway 1146 stops in mid-October. Reclamation urges those recreating or working along Yakima basin rivers to exercise increased caution, stay away from the areas where spillway water flows into the river, portage around buoys and stay out of dangerously turbulent flows. <P> “This annual flip-flop operation maintains relatively low, more natural flows, which are important for Chinook salmon spawning in the upper Yakima, Cle Elum, and Bumping rivers,” said Chuck Garner, Yakima Project River Operations supervisor. “It also allows us to reduce impacts to irrigation water supplies because lower flow releases improve reservoir storage for the coming season.” <P> Flows below Cle Elum Reservoir will continue to decrease from a July 23 high of 3,354 cubic feet per second (cfs) to a low of about 180 cfs around Sept. 10. One cubic foot equals 7.48 gallons. So, during this flow transition, Cle Elum Reservoir release flows will decline by about 23,744 gallons per second—from 25,090 gallons per second on July 23 to about 1,346 gallons per second around Sept. 10. Conversely, flows from Rimrock Reservoir will increase from between 800 and 1,500 cfs during the Labor Day weekend to between 1,700 and 2,400 cfs by mid-September, depending on irrigation demands and weather conditions. Rimrock outflows will begin to decrease in the second half of September and by Oct. 22, will be between 50 and 130 cfs to maintain required downstream minimum flows. <P> Streamflow changes will occur gradually during the Labor Day weekend. Streamflow information can be found on Reclamation’s website at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/yakima/index.html">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/yakima/index.html</a>. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=67404 Reclamation announces the temporary closure of Haystack Reservoir recreation area
MADRAS, Ore. – The Bureau of Reclamation will temporarily close the North Shore Fishing Pier recreation area from September 9 through September 30 to perform road and parking lot paving improvements. The North Shore Fishing Pier recreation area, which is located at the Haystack Reservoir, is a free day-use area with an accessible fishing pier, parking and access to the reservoir. Haystack Reservoir is located about 10 miles south of Madras. <P> “Our facilities provide many wonderful recreational opportunities for the public to enjoy the outdoors with both land and water activities,” said Gregg Garnett, Reclamation’s Bend Field Office manager. “We routinely monitor and maintain these recreational sites to help keep the public safe.” <P> The public will continue to have options for camping and lake access during the temporary closure. The West Shore recreation area and South Shore Group Campground will remain open for the 2019 season offering camping, boating, picnicking and parking. <P> Haystack Reservoir borders Crook, Deschutes, and Jefferson counties and is impounded by Haystack Dam, which was built in 1957. It is owned by Reclamation and operated by the North Unit Irrigation District that supplies irrigation water to the area. <P> For more information, please contact the Bureau of Reclamation’s Bend Field Office at (541) 389-6541. <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=67343 Reclamation seeks public comment on potential changes to water storage in the Boise River system
BOISE, Idaho – Planning for future water needs in the Boise River basin is essential to ensure a secure water supply for future generations. The Bureau of Reclamation and the Idaho Water Resource Board have been studying options for increasing water storage capacity within the Boise River system via an ongoing feasibility study. <P> “Reclamation has placed a high priority on enhancing our infrastructure, and we’re delighted to partner with the state to meet critical water supply needs,” said Reclamation’s Snake River Area Manager Roland Springer. <P> In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, Reclamation is preparing an environmental impact statement on the Boise River Basin Feasibility Study. Reclamation will be gathering information from other agencies, interested parties and the public on a range of possible alternatives. Three public scoping open houses are planned for August to solicit input on potential increases to water storage in the Boise River basin. The public scoping open houses on the EIS are as follows: <P> <ul> <li>August 27, 1:00–3:00 p.m. – Boise River Senior Center, Pine, Idaho</li> <li>August 28, 6:00–8:00 p.m. – Wyndham Garden Inn, Boise, Idaho</li> <li>August 29, 6:00–8:00 p.m. – American Legion, Mountain Home, Idaho</li> </ul> Additional water storage capacity could help offset changes in precipitation patterns and help enable storage of more runoff in high water years, enhancing long-term water supply for critical irrigation, domestic, industrial and municipal needs while continuing to meet endangered species and power generation needs. <P> IWRB has committed to fund half the study costs as the non-federal partner. IWRB was created by the Idaho legislature and is responsible for the formulation and implementation of a state water plan, finance of water projects, and the operation of programs that support sustainable management of Idaho’s water resources. <P> Comments must be submitted by 5 p.m. on September 9, 2019, through the Boise River Basin Feasibility Study official website at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/studies/boisefeasibility/index.html">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/studies/boisefeasibility/index.html</a>, or by email to <a href="mailto:BOR-SRA-BoiFeasibility@usbr.gov">BOR-SRA-BoiFeasibility@usbr.gov</a>. Accessibility requests should be made by August 16, 2019, to <a href="BOR-SRA-BoiFeasibility@usbr.gov">BOR-SRA-BoiFeasibility@usbr.gov</a>. <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=67223 Reclamation announces slight improvement to Yakima basin water supply - August forecast
YAKIMA, Wash. – The Bureau of Reclamation’s August 2019 Total Water Supply Available forecast for the Yakima basin indicates the water supply will fully satisfy senior water rights. Junior water rights will receive an estimated 69% of their entitlements for the period June 3–September 30. This prediction denotes an increase of two percent from the previous month’s forecast. <P> “The moderate temperatures and precipitation at our reservoirs at 84% of average in July helped stream flows hold up fairly well,” said Chuck Garner, Yakima Project River Operations supervisor. Garner recommends that water conservation always be a part of water usage in the Yakima basin, especially this season with the low water supply. <P> Reclamation manages the water in the five Yakima Project storage reservoirs, along with the basin’s unregulated inflows to fulfill water rights, water contracts and instream flow obligations. Water shortages in the basin are shared equally by the junior water rights, which represent over half of the water rights in the basin. <P> Reclamation provides an updated monthly water supply forecast, at least through August, using the latest data each month to reflect any changing conditions as they develop. <P> The August forecast is based on flows, precipitation, snowpack and reservoir storage through August 1, along with estimates of future precipitation and river flows. <P> For more information, visit Reclamation’s website at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/yakima">https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/yakima</a>. <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=67143 Reclamation reduces flows at Anderson Ranch Dam
BOISE, Idaho–To facilitate the completion of maintenance activities, the Bureau of Reclamation began reducing flows at Anderson Ranch Dam on Monday, July 29, 2019. By Thursday morning, August 1, 2019, the South Fork of the Boise River below Anderson Ranch Dam will be flowing at about 600 cubic feet per second. <P> “Managing our operations and maintenance program efficiently will aid in ensuring our infrastructure continues to perform as designed,” said Ryan Hedrick, Snake River Area Office hydrologist. <P> The reduction in flow is normal for this time of year, but the operation is occurring about 20 days early to allow for maintenance at Arrowrock Dam. A flow of 600 cfs will continue until mid-September. Flows will then be reduced to approximately 300 cfs, which is typical for the fall season. <P>