Commissioner's Offce News Releases http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom News Releases from Reclamation's Commissioner's Office https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=63063 Bureau of Reclamation selects 16 projects to receive $3.5 million for desalination and water purification research
WASHINGTON – Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman announced that 16 entities will receive $3.5 million for laboratory and pilot-scale research projects as part of the Desalination and Water Purification Research Program. The DWPR Program works with Reclamation researchers and partners to develop more innovative, cost-effective and technologically efficient ways to desalinate water. <P> “Desalination is an increasingly important source of water for Western communities" Commissioner Burman said. "Investing in innovative technologies to make desalination more affordable and energy-efficient will help many communities across the United States.” <P> Nine laboratory projects and seven pilot-scale projects were selected for funding. A laboratory-scale study is typically a bench scale study involving small flow rates. They are used to determine the viability of a novel process, new materials, or process modifications. Research at this stage often involves a high degree of risk and uncertainty. <P> A pilot-scale project tests a novel process at a sufficiently large scale to determine the technical, practical, and economic viability of the process and are generally preceded by laboratory studies that demonstrate if that the technology works. The $3.5 million will be matched with $4.8 million in non-federal funding. <P> The nine laboratory projects are: <P> <ul> <li>Argonne National Laboratory – Compressible foam supercapacitor electrodes for energy-efficient and low-cost desalination. $150,000</li> <li>Colorado State University – Developing relationships between mineral scaling and membrane surface chemistry to improve water recovery of inland brackish water desalination. $133,634</li> <li>Fraunhofer USA, Inc – Plasma activated biochar for high-efficiency capacitive desalination. $72,173</li> <li>New Mexico State University – Portable wind turbines for potable water through electrodialysis treatment. $150,000</li> <li>Trussel Technologies, Inc. – Novel online surrogates to monitor reverse osmosis performance in reuse applications. $150,000</li> <li>University of Arizona – Near zero-liquid discharge water reuse with a closed-circuit ozone-membrane distillation process. $146,361</li> <li>University of California, Davis – Flow cytometric monitoring of waterborne pathogens to facilitate water treatment and direct potable water reuse. $149,178</li> <li>University of Notre Dame – High performance biocatalytic membranes with cell surface display enzymes for improved concentrate management. $149,995</li> <li>Vanderbilt University – Polyelectrolyte/Micelle multiplayer nanofiltration membranes with drastically enhanced performance. $150,000</li> </ul> <P> The seven pilot-scale projects are: <P> <ul> <li>Carollo Engineers, Inc – Pilot testing a two-stage, fixed bed biotreatment system for selenium removal. $279,246</li> <li>Gradiant Osmotics, LLC – Counter flow RO - Innovative desalination technology for cost-effective concentrate management and reduced energy use. $400,000</li> <li>Massachusetts Institute of Technology – Pilot testing dynamic optimized, photovoltaic-powered, time-variant electrodialysis reversal desalination system. $400,000</li> <li>New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology – Geothermal membrane distillation for large-scale use. $200,000</li> <li>New Mexico State University – Assessment and implementation framework for transboundary brackish groundwater desalination in south-central New Mexico. $399,353</li> <li>The City of Daytona Beach – Tracking the occurrence and removal of microbial and toxic hazards during potable reuse through online monitoring and advanced analytics. $400,000</li> <li>University of California, Riverside – Innovative water reuse systems harnessing chloramine photochemistry for potable water reuse. $200,000</li> </ul> <P> The DWPR program is supporting the Department of the Interior's priorities, including: creating a conservation stewardship legacy second only to Teddy Roosevelt, utilizing our natural resources, and restoring trust with local communities, among others. <P> To learn more about Reclamation's Desalination and Water Purification Research Program and see complete descriptions of the research projects please visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/research/dwpr">www.usbr.gov/research/dwpr</a>. <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=62958 Reclamation awards $1.9 million to fourteen tribes
WASHINGTON – Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman announced that fourteen tribes were selected to receive $1.9 million for technical assistance through the Native American Affairs Technical Assistance to Tribes Program. <P> "Reclamation is committed to working with tribes on water management issues," Commissioner Burman said. "This funding will help establish cooperative working relationships with Indian tribes and tribal organizations and ensure they can be fully engaged as they develop, manage and protect their water resources." <P> Reclamation will provide the funding to the tribes as grants or cooperative agreements. The fourteen projects selected are: <P> <ul> <li>The Chickasaw Nation, additional water supply for the City of Tishomingo, $178,415</li> <li>Northern Arapaho Tribe, Arapaho Ranch domestic water well development project, $98,450</li> <li>Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, process improvements for failing water and wastewater treatment plants in Choctaw Territory, Reclamation funding: $197,454</li> <li>Northern Cheyenne Tribe, water marketing project, $93,148</li> <li>Pascua Yaqui Tribe, design and engineering of water pipeline to irrigate the Pascua Yaqui Tribe’s Wellness Center in Pueblo, $125,000</li> <li>Bishop Paiute Tribe, Bishop Paiute Irrigation Water: Beneficial Use Project, $170,475</li> <li>Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe, the 57-3 Lateral Irrigation Improvement Project, $199,999</li> <li>Tule River Tribe, Tule River Tribe Water Resource Assessment Project, $100,000</li> <li>Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, improved management of surface water diversions for the Michaud Unit of the Fort Hall Irrigation Project, $196,341</li> <li>Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Indian Reservation, Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Indian Reservation Water Management Project, $70,393</li> <li>Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Critical Water Quality Data Collection Project, $76,050</li> <li>Pueblo of Santa Ana, technical training in river protection for the Pueblo of Santa Ana, $9,788</li> <li>Pueblo of Santa Ana, overhaul of groundwater observation wells throughout the riparian corridor along the Rio Grande and Rio Jemez riparian corridors at the Pueblo of Santa Ana, $189,103</li> <li>Pueblo of Jemez, Pueblo of Jemez management of water resources, $189,609</li> </ul> <P> The Native American and International Affairs Office in the Commissioner's Office serves as the central coordination point for the Native American Affairs Program and lead for policy guidance for Native American issues in Reclamation. To learn more, please visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/native">www.usbr.gov/native</a>. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=62710 Bureau of Reclamation provides 27 projects $2.6 million in WaterSMART Cooperative Watershed Management Program grants
WASHINGTON - Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman announced that 27 entities were selected to receive a total of $2.6 million to establish or further develop watershed groups in order to address water quantity or quality through Cooperative Watershed Management Program Grants. Of the 27 entities selected, 19 are existing watershed groups, including one from the Virgin Islands, and 8 are establishing a new watershed group. <P> "Reducing conflict over water is an important goal," Commissioner Burman said. "Working collaboratively with locally-led groups is the best path forward to reduce conflict and develop solutions that will lead to the long-term viability of watersheds." <P> Selected entities may use their funding to develop bylaws, a mission statement, complete stakeholder outreach, develop a watershed restoration plan, and to conduct watershed management project design. <P> A complete list of the selected projects is available at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/cwmp">https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/cwmp</a>. <P> The Save Our Bosque Task Force in Socorro, New Mexico, is one of the groups selected to receive funding. It will receive $100,000 to update their 2004 conceptual restoration plan on the Rio Grande floodplain through Socorro County where flooding can devastate farms, infrastructure and small communities. Recent drought conditions have limited available surface water supplies in the watershed, increasing wildfire risk and reliance on groundwater, which also strains aquifers. The task force will work with the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District, New Mexico State Forestry and numerous other local, state and federal agencies to complete outreach to stakeholders. <P> The Coral Bay Community Council on the island of St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands will receive $99,155 to complete a five-year update to its watershed management plan and develop a visioning document for the Coral Bay Watershed. The group has spent a significant amount of time characterizing source pollution into Coral Bay, including unmanaged stormwater, sediment transport and an inadequate solid waste system. In addition, back-to-back hurricanes in 2017 have increased the need for updated planning efforts. The council will hold stakeholder meetings to help inform the public of the importance of watershed planning and to incorporate diverse perspectives in the updated plan and visioning document. <P> Through WaterSMART, Reclamation works cooperatively with States, Tribes, and local entities as they plan for and implement actions to increase water supply through investments to modernize existing infrastructure and attention to local water conflicts. Visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart">https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart</a> for additional information about the program. <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=62690 Jeffrey Morris named Bureau of Reclamation's Manager of Native American and International Affairs
WASHINGTON – Bureau of Reclamation's Commissioner Brenda Burman announced that Jeffrey Morris was selected as the Manager for Native American and International Affairs. In this position, Morris will coordinate Reclamation's Native American and International Affairs programs. <P> "These programs are vital to Reclamation's relationships with tribes and the international community," Commissioner Burman said. "Jeff's valuable experience working on Indian water right settlements and as a civil engineer will be a great asset for Reclamation as we continue our important work in Indian country and throughout the world." <P> Morris joined Reclamation in 2007 as an estimator in the Technical Service Center after 10 years in the private sector as a consulting engineer. He moved to the Design, Estimating and Construction Oversight and Value Program Office as the Value Program Manger where he sought to improve projects with cost effective, innovative solutions without sacrificing key objectives and functions. <P> His most recent position was the manager of the Design, Estimating and Construction Oversight and Value Program Office. While he was in this position, he served as a senior technical advisor to the Secretary of the Interior's Indian Water Rights Office. He also led more than 50 multidisciplinary teams of technical experts that sought to improve projects by identifying risk and uncertainty and innovative solutions to meet the unique needs of each client. <P> He is a licensed professional engineer in Colorado and Texas. Morris received a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from the University of South Florida in 1995 and a Master of Science in Civil Engineering in 1997 from the University of Texas at Austin. <P> Reclamation is committed to increasing opportunities for Indians to develop, manage, and protect their water and related resources. The <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/native/">Native American Affairs Program</a> is a collaborative, coordinated, integrated function in Reclamation. Reclamation's <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/international/">International Affairs Program</a> consists of a variety of reimbursable activities with global partners, including technology exchange, training, and technical assistance. <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=62594 Bureau of Reclamation allocates more than $4 million to combat quagga and zebra mussels in the West
WASHINGTON - The Bureau of Reclamation has allocated more than $4 million for federal, state, and tribal projects to prevent, contain, control, and monitor invasive quagga and zebra mussels in the West. This funding advances actions announced by Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke in June 2017 as part of the initiative called "Safeguarding the West: Actions to Strengthen Federal, State, and Tribal Coordination to Address Invasive Mussels." This funding builds on $1 million in 2017 to support initiatives by the federal government, as well as work by the Western Governors’ Association, western states, and tribes to protect western ecosystems, water infrastructure, and hydroelectric facilities from invasive mussels. <P> "For more than a century, Reclamation and its partners in the West have invested in water infrastructure that is today at risk from invasive quagga and zebra mussels," Commissioner Brenda Burman said. "The funding we are announcing today will be used on efforts to prevent their spread while improving ways to manage facilities when the first sign of these invasive mussels is detected." <P> "The fight against invasive mussels in the West requires collaboration and partnership at all levels of government, including, importantly, those between Reclamation and Western states," said the Western Governors’ Association. "With this new funding, western states will be able to enhance invasive mussel management at many levels, including research, monitoring, prevention, and enforcement." <P> Highlights of the funded projects include these actions: <P> <ul> <li>Purchasing inspection and decontamination stations to inspect and decontaminate boats leaving the lower Colorado River in California and Nevada, including supporting the National Park Service at Lake Mead National Recreation Area.</li> <li>Supporting the Salish Kootenai Tribe at Flathead Lake Aquatic Invasive Species program.</l> <li>Developing vulnerability assessments for facilities and infrastructure at risk of mussel infestation in the Columbia River Basin.</li> <li>Assisting the State of Arizona in providing law enforcement support at inspection stations.</li> <li>Funding research for the State of Montana and Reclamation on viability of veligers in residual water in boats.</li> <li>Supporting watercraft inspection stations at Reclamation reservoirs in Nebraska and Kansas.</li> <li>Implementing the state Aquatic Invasive Species Management Plan at water bodies owned by Reclamation in Utah.</li> <li>Analyzing water quality to determine which water bodies should be prioritized for invasive mussel monitoring and prevention in California.</li> <li>Continuing and enhancing water quality and quagga mussel monitoring program at high-priority programs in the Pacific Northwest and various reservoirs in the upper Colorado River Basin.</li> <li>Conducting watercraft inspections at Navajo and Elephant Butte reservoirs in New Mexico.</li> </ul> <P> Invasive mussels pose challenges for Reclamation and others who manage water. Invasive mussels are prolific breeders and settle on or within water facility infrastructure such as water intakes, gates, diversion screens, hydropower equipment, pumps, pipelines and boats. Infested water and hydropower infrastructure can fail or choke off water transmissions. The mussels also negatively impact the natural ecology, which can be detrimental to native and endangered species, including native fisheries. To learn more about invasive mussel management and research at Reclamation, please visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/mussels">https://www.usbr.gov/mussels</a>. <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=62570 Bureau of Reclamation announces winners of the Long-Term Corrosion Protection of Existing Hydraulic Steel Structures Prize Competition
WASHINGTON - Brenda Burman, Commissioner of the Bureau of Reclamation, announced that five individuals were awarded a total of $47,500 for their innovative solutions to protect large hydraulic steel structures from corrosion during Stage 1 of the Long-Term Corrosion Protection of Existing Hydraulic Steel Structures Prize Competition. <P> “We were seeking protection ideas that extend beyond currently available coatings and cathodic protection,” Burman said. “We are excited to see how these proposed solutions might help ensure that our submerged steel structures are protected from corrosion.” <P> The Long-Term Corrosion Protection of Existing Hydraulic Steel Structures Prize Competition was initiated as a mechanism to generate novel solutions to protect Reclamation’s hydroelectric penstock pipes and gates from corrosion for fifty years or longer, and with minimal maintenance and installation costs. <P> The Stage 1 winners of the Long-Term Corrosion Protection of Existing Hydraulic Steel Structures Prize Competition include: <P> Bretton Holmes, Phoenix, Arizona<br /> Several supersonic material deposition metallization processes, including high velocity laser accelerated deposition. These can be performed at ambient temperatures and atmospheric conditions, do not require grit/shot blast cleaning of the substrate in a first pass, achieve far superior bonding over epoxy coatings, allow for the application of composite materials in a single pass to enable both corrosion and abrasion resistance, and provide superior protection, all at reasonable cost. <P> Kirby Meacham, Cleveland, Ohio<br /> Atmospheric pressure vulcanized rubber protective sheeting. The uncured sheet rubber can be applied to steel structures in the field, and the vulcanization process is carried out at atmospheric pressure. The approach does not release organic solvents that could affect workers or the environment, and end-of-life disposal is safe. The environmental durability of rubber is demonstrated by the success of vulcanized EPDM commercial roof and pond liner membranes, as well as the persistence of scrap tires in the environment. <P> John Newport, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania<br /> Organometall-phosphato polymer is fined dispersed within an epoxy modified polysulfide coating and chemically cured to provide a dual corrosion protection mechanism. The approach is expected to be in the range of $120/gallon (compared with $100/gal for the polysulfide epoxy alone). The formulation may be applied by spraying from a two-component mix and is solvent and volatiles free. <P> David Orlebeke, Ridgecrest, California<br /> Use of highly underutilized cold spray technique that applies a solid at a speed that converts aluminum to a liquid as an untreated metal coating application. Because this process does not produce noxious fumes, it is much safer for the operator, and for the environment. <P> Daniel Williams, Milltown, New Jersey<br /> Provides long-term corrosion protection of existing hydraulic structures by using the novel, existing, cost-competitive, and environmentally friendly technology of cold-spray (supersonic particle deposition) to apply an alloy of highly corrosion-resistant titanium, and a non-reactive noble metal (such as ruthenium or palladium) to the geometries of infrastructures. <P> To learn more about prize competitions at Reclamation, please visit: <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/research/challenges/index.html">https://www.usbr.gov/research/challenges/index.html.</a> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=62551 Bureau of Reclamation announces winners of the DataApp Prize Competition
WASHINGTON - Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman announced that seven individuals were awarded a total of $60,000 for their innovative software architecture concepts and software technologies to support field data collection using mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones. <P> “Improved data collection apps can assist our efforts to more efficiently collect field data in a user-friendly manner,” Burman said. “We are excited to see how these proposed solutions might help address our data collection needs.” <P> The DataApp Prize Competition was designed to solicit novel ideas from the public to improve data collection software for mobile devices, like improving the functionality and flexibility of data collection apps to support the broad range of water and environmental monitoring needs ranging from monitoring infrastructure to characterizing habitat conditions. <P> To learn more about the DataApp Prize Competition, visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/research/challenges/dataapp.html">https://www.usbr.gov/research/challenges/dataapp.html</a>. <P> The Stage 1 winners of the Data Application Prize Competition are: <P> Alexis Cullen, Clinton Township, Michigan<br /> Update and extension of the existing Succinct Data app to provide additional functionality and flexibility across a wide range of data collection needs using well-established and widely-used open source software technologies, including the use of Network Mesh Communications technology to improve real-time data transmission. <P> Stephen Deck, Cary, North Carolina<br /> Cloud-based software architecture that leverages existing open source tools, such as Cordova, Django, and MongoDB to provide an extensible and scalable application. <P> Cody Flagg, Boulder, Colorado<br /> Extension of the existing Open Data Kit open-source data collection software framework to provide additional functionality through the use of a community package manager, a standardized metadata dictionary, and modules to interface with commonly used sensors. <P> George Gruse, Brookeville, Maryland<br /> Novel integration of common software technologies to support robust and reliable data collection, capture, and transference across multiple devices using an array of toolsets to transmit and store the data. <P> Bretton Holmes, Phoenix, Arizona<br /> Innovative use of a flow-based programming software architectural to facilitate development and deployment of custom data collection apps using visual tools. <P> Shawn Ross, Macquarie Park, New South Wales, Australia<br /> Update and extension on the existing FAIMS Mobile open-source framework to allow users to create customized data collection apps that include custom data structures and workflows, tailored exports to other software or services, offline functionality with opportunistic synchronization, mapping, multimedia management, and support for sensors and other devices. <P> Don Tjandra, Dublin, California<br /> Innovative integration of voice-driven artificial intelligence and natural language processing--e.g., similar to intelligent personal assistants such as Amazon Alexa, Apple Siri, and Google Now--into an app framework for field data collection. <P> To learn more prize competitions at Reclamation, please visit Reclamation's Water Prize Competition Center at: <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/research/challenges/index.html">www.usbr.gov/research/challenges/index.html</a>. <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=62550 Bureau of Reclamation awards $8.3 Million to 15 drought resiliency projects
WASHINGTON - Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman announced that Reclamation has awarded $8.3 million to 15 projects in California, New Mexico and Utah for the preparation and response to drought. The types of projects selected increase water management flexibility and water supply reliability. These projects also reduce the need for drought emergency response actions. The funding provided is part of the U.S. Department of the Interior's WaterSMART initiative. <P> "Helping western states prepare and build resiliency for future drought is an essential part of Reclamation’s 116-year history,” Commissioner Burman said. "By proactively planning for drought, communities are able to reduce its impact and improve their ability to recover once the rain and snow start to fall.” <P> There were 13 projects selected in California and one each in New Mexico and Utah. To learn more about all the projects selected, please visit Reclamation's Drought website at https://www.usbr.gov/drought. <P> The Elephant Butte Irrigation District in Las Cruces, New Mexico, will receive $180,670 to develop and modernize its infrastructure to facilitate watershed scale flow management, stormwater harvesting and aquifer recharge. The project will allow for faster information transfer and shortened personnel response time resulting in better water capture and water management during storm events. The district will also bring $181,784 in non-federal funds to the project. <P> Ephraim City in central Utah will receive $645,255 to construct a new water well capable of producing up to 328 acre-feet of water per year, increasing the annual supply of the city by 28-percent. It will also connect a short pipeline from the well to the city's potable water supply. This well will provide the city with a new source of water and improve their overall potable water quality over extended periods of drought. This project was identified in the city's water management and conservation plan. They are also contributing $788,645 in non-federal funds. <P> The San Juan Water District and Sacramento County Water Authority in California will complete two interties that were identified as mitigation actions in the North American Basin Regional Drought Contingency Plan recently completed under Reclamation's Drought Response Program. They will construct an intertie by SJWD to receive water from the Placer County Water Authority and the SCWA will complete an intertie to deliver groundwater to the City of Sacramento. They will receive $300,000 from Reclamation while contributing $322,185 in non-federal funds to the project. <P> Drought resiliency projects are part of Reclamation's Drought Response Program. It helps communities recognize the next drought in its early stages, learn how droughts will impact them, and protect themselves during the next drought. It is structured to encourage an open and inclusive planning effort to build long-term resiliency to drought. Learn more at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/drought/">https://www.usbr.gov/drought/</a>. <P> Through WaterSMART, Reclamation works cooperatively with States, Tribes, and local entities as they plan for and implement actions to increase water supply reliability through investments to modernize existing infrastructure and attention to local water conflicts. Visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart">https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart</a> for additional information about WaterSMART. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=62353 Bureau of Reclamation makes funding opportunities available for Desalination Construction Projects under the WIIN Act and Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Projects
WASHINGTON – The Bureau of Reclamation has made two funding opportunities available, Desalination Construction Projects under the WIIN Act and Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Projects. Applications are due for both funding opportunities by 4 p.m. MDT on July 27, 2018. <P> The Desalination Construction Projects under the WIIN Act funding opportunity provides sponsors of ocean and brackish water desalination project the opportunity to request cost-shared funding for the planning, design and/or construction of those projects. Desalination projects provide flexibility for communities to stretch the limited water supplies in the Western United States by developing and supplementing municipal and irrigation water supplies through the treatment of ocean or brackish water. Reclamation is making up to $18 million available under this funding opportunity. This funding opportunity is available at <a href="www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> by searching for funding opportunity number BOR-DO-18-F012. <P> The Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Projects funding opportunity allows for sponsors of water reclamation and reuse projects that are congressionally authorized or are eligible under section 4009(c) of the WIIN Act to request cost-shared funding for planning, design and/or construction of those Projects. Water reclamation and reuse projects provide improved efficiency, flexibility during water shortages and diversifies the water supply. Reclamation is making up to $20 million available for those projects authorized under the WIIN Act and $34 million for the congressionally authorized Title XVI projects. Learn more about Title XVI at <a href="www.usbr.gov/watersmart/title/">www.usbr.gov/watersmart/title/</a>. This funding opportunity is available at <a href="www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> by searching for funding opportunity number BOR-DO-18-F011. <P> Both of these funding opportunities are part of WaterSMART. Through WaterSMART, Reclamation works cooperatively with States, Tribes, and local entities as they plan for and implement actions to increase water supply through investments to modernize existing infrastructure and attention to local water conflicts. Visit https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart for additional information about WaterSMART. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=62292 Bureau of Reclamation provides $260,000 for two WaterSMART drought contingency planning projects
WASHINGTON - Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman announced that the El Dorado County Water Agency and Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District will receive $260,000, combined, to prepare drought contingency plans. The funding provided is part of the U.S. Department of the Interior's WaterSMART initiative. <P> "Preparing for drought is imperative for communities throughout the Western United States," Commissioner Burman said. "Through drought contingency planning, communities can reduce impacts of drought, avoid the likelihood of catastrophic reductions and recover more quickly when drought conditions lessen." <P> The El Dorado County Water Agency in California will receive $100,000 to create a regional drought contingency plan for the upper American River and upper Consumnes River watersheds located east of Sacramento, California. These watersheds are an important source of water to meet residential, agricultural, recreation and hydroelectric generation water demands. There are numerous small rural communities and several concentrated populated areas within the planning area. The regional plan will build on existing planning efforts, including the on-going American River Basin Study, and the North American Basin Regional Drought Contingency Plan recently completed downstream under Reclamation’s Drought Response Program. <P> The Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District in Utah will receive $160,000 to develop a drought contingency plan for its service area in Salt Lake and Utah counties. The district's service area includes 15 cities and is home to nearly 25% of Utah's population and is expecting rapid population growth due to a healthy economy. The district will assemble stakeholders from all sectors to identify projects, actions and partnerships needed to prepare for and reduce water shortages and improve drought resilience for the areas water users. <P> Drought contingency planning is part of Reclamation's Drought Response Program. It helps communities recognize the next drought in its early stages, learn how droughts will impact them, and protect themselves during the next drought. It is structured to encourage an open and inclusive planning effort to build long-term resiliency to drought. Learn more at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/drought/">https://www.usbr.gov/drought/</a>. <P> Through WaterSMART, Reclamation works cooperatively with States, Tribes, and local entities as they plan for and implement actions to increase water supply through investments to modernize existing infrastructure and attention to local water conflicts. Visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart">https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart</a> for additional information about WaterSMART. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=62175 Bureau of Reclamation launches prize competition seeking improved methods for monitoring pathogens to facilitate water reuse
WASHINGTON - The Bureau of Reclamation is launching a new prize competition that is seeking improved methods to sample and monitor for pathogens, specifically viruses, in order to help with indirect and direct reuse of wastewater. Solutions sought through this prize competition must improve on the current state of the technology for virus monitoring. <P> This is stage one of a planned two-stage challenge. This competition is a theoretical challenge where participants will be asked to submit ideas, along with detailed descriptions, specifications, supporting data or literature, and requirements necessary to bring the idea closer to becoming a product. Up to five prizes may be awarded for a total prize award pool of $80,000. To be successful in this competition, the solution must accelerate the development of either direct or indirect virus monitoring methods for water reuse applications. <P> If stage one demonstrates that a second stage is beneficial, stage two will launch as a subsequent competition. In the second stage of the competition, participants will be asked to present their technology and submit a working prototype that puts their idea into practice. Stage two anticipates having a larger prize purse. You will not have to participate stage one of the prize competition to participate in stage two. <P> Reclamation is the seeker on this competition and Xylem, Inc. is a co-sponsor, contributing to all aspects, including the prize purse. The Environmental Protection Agency and The Water Reuse Foundation are collaborating on various aspects of this competition. <P> To learn more, please visit the challenge website at: <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/research/challenges/pathogen.html">https://www.usbr.gov/research/challenges/pathogen.html</a>. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=62170 Another dry year in the Colorado River Basin increases the need for additional state and federal actions
WASHINGTON - 2018 has brought record-low snowpack levels to many locations in the Colorado River Basin, making this the driest 19-year period on record. With the depressed snowpack and warming conditions, experts indicate that runoff from the Rocky Mountains into Lake Powell this spring will yield only 42 percent of the long-term average. <P> With drought and low runoff conditions dating back to 2000, this current period is one of the worst drought cycles over the past 1,200 plus years. <P> While many water users in the Colorado River Basin have already experienced significant hardships, three factors have avoided a crisis – so far – in the Basin: <P> <ul> <li>Water stored in Colorado River reservoirs during prior years of plentiful snowpack and runoff has helped ensure continued and reliable water and power from Reclamation infrastructure.</li> <li>Reclamation reservoirs were nearly full when drought conditions began in 2000 providing ample water supplies that have carried the Basin through this period of historic drought.</li> <li>Voluntary water conservation efforts taken by Reclamation, the seven Colorado River Basin states, water districts and Mexico have stabilized the decline of Lake Mead – delaying the onset of reductions to water users in Arizona, Nevada, Mexico, and ultimately California. But these efforts by themselves would not protect Lake Mead and Lake Powell if drought conditions persist.</li> </ul> <P> The infrastructure built by prior generations is working, but the best information available shows a high likelihood of significant water reductions in the Colorado River Basin in the years ahead. Concerns are increasing as forecast models predict a 52 percent chance of shortage conditions at Lake Mead beginning in 2020, with a greater than 60 percent likelihood of shortage thereafter. Over the past decade, the risk of declining to critical reservoir levels has approximately tripled. <P> Following strong calls for action in 2017, Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman is focused on the increased risk from another dry year in the Colorado River Basin. She noted that there is no indication that the current low runoff and drought conditions will end anytime soon. She emphasized that the extended drought and increased risk of crisis in the Colorado River Basin requires prompt action. <P> "We need action and we need it now. We can’t afford to wait for a crisis before we implement drought contingency plans," said Reclamation Commissioner Burman. "We all—states, tribes, water districts, non-governmental organizations—have an obligation and responsibility to work together to meet the needs of over 40 million people who depend on reliable water and power from the Colorado River. I’m calling on the Colorado River basin states to put real – and effective – drought contingency plans in place before the end of this year." <P> In 2017, the United States and Mexico agreed to a new strategy that would lead to increased savings of water by Mexico, but that agreement will only go into effect if the Lower Basin states of Arizona, California and Nevada finalize their drought contingency plan. <P> "Adoption of additional water conservation measures now is the best approach to protect Lake Mead as we continue to work on long-term solutions," said Lower Colorado Regional Director Terry Fulp. <P> Upper Colorado Regional Director Brent Rhees added, "We’ve weathered the past two decades of drought thanks to our water storage infrastructure. Completing drought contingency plans will provide better certainty for continued reliable water and power." <P> <em>The following individual statements were provided by the Governors' Representatives of the Colorado River Basin States:</em> <P> <ul> <li>Pat Tyrrell, Wyoming’s State Engineer stated: "This is a critical juncture and we must complete drought contingency plans in both the Upper Basin and the Lower Basin prior to crisis. Further delay is not an option, and I have to believe we can get to 'yes.' Full implementation of Minute 323 with Mexico is only possible when the drought contingency plans are complete, and with Lower Basin shortages likely by 2020, we have no other palatable solution."</li> <br /> <li>"Colorado is heartened by Commissioner Burman's call to action, stands at the ready to move drought contingency planning forward, and agrees that the situation is urgent. Paraphrasing Ben Franklin, the states must hang together or we'll hang separately," said Colorado's James Eklund.</li> <br /> <li>"With the threat of this unprecedented drought continuing, the Colorado River Basin States and Mexico need to complete drought contingency planning efforts in the near future. We need the participation of all these parties in order to ensure this goal’s accomplishment. It has never been more important to work together," said Eric Millis, Director of the Utah Division of Water Resources.</li> <br /> <li>"New Mexico believes that drought contingency plans are a key step to surviving this exceptional drought. Now is the time for us to come together and establish a path for the future of the Colorado River Basin," said Tom Blaine, New Mexico State Engineer.</li> <br /> <li>"This ongoing drought is a serious situation and Mother Nature does not care about our politics or our schedules," said John Entsminger, Southern Nevada Water Authority general manager. "We have a duty to get back to the table and finish the Drought Contingency Plan to protect the people and the environment that rely upon the Colorado River."</li> <br /> <li>California’s Colorado River Commissioner, Bart Fisher, stated that, "California’s Colorado River agencies recognize the continuing poor hydrologic conditions within both California and the Colorado River Basin, and remain fully committed to collaborate with our partner states in completing the Lower Basin Drought Contingency Plan and ensuring activation of the Mexican Binational Water Scarcity Contingency Plan contained within Minute No. 323."</li> <br /> <li>"The completion of the lower basin states’ Drought Contingency Plan is vitally important to Arizonans. The plan reduces the likelihood of Lake Mead declining to critically low levels and incentivizes the use of tools to conserve water in the Lake so that reductions in delivery of Arizona’s Colorado River supplies are avoided or lessened," said Thomas Buschatzke, Director of the Arizona Department of Water Resources.</li> </ul> <P> In addition to Reclamation's ongoing work with the Colorado River Basin states, it also coordinates with the Upper Colorado River Commission. Felicity Hannay, Chair of the Upper Colorado River Commission, said that "The Commission takes the position that implementation of drought contingency plans in both basins is critical to get us through this dry spell." <P> Projections of Lake Powell and Lake Mead operations for the next five years can be found at <a href="https://go.usa.gov/xQNM7" target="_blank">https://go.usa.gov/xQNM7</a>. <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=61950 Bureau of Reclamation extends public comment period for project use power draft directive and standard until May 11, 2018
WASHINGTON - The Bureau of Reclamation has extended the public comment period on the draft directive and standard that defines the eligible uses and recipients of project use power and related cost recovery and rate setting methodology. Comments are due by May 11, 2018. <P> The draft directive and standard is available at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/recman">https://www.usbr.gov/recman</a>. <P> This draft release is an update to an existing directive and standard, published in 2005 and reflects comments received per the initial review and comment period, announced in April 2017. Project use power is that electrical capacity, energy, and associated ancillary service components required to provide the minimum electrical service needed to operate and/or maintain Reclamation Project facilities in conformance with project authorization. <P> Various Congressional authorizations give Reclamation the ability to develop, generate, and use electrical power for the benefit of Reclamation project lands and other purposes. The power can be used for various functions, such as pumping water associated with irrigating Reclamation project lands. This directive and standard describes the various authorized uses. <P> Congressional authorizations for project use power vary across Reclamation projects; to the extent this directive and standard can be interpreted to conflict with such congressional authorizations, the congressional authorizations control. <P> Your questions or comments on this draft directive and standards should be sent to Clark Bishop at cbishop@usbr.gov. <P> Learn more about Reclamation's Power Program at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/power">https://www.usbr.gov/power</a>. <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=61912 Bureau of Reclamation selects eight ideas for its More Water, Less Concentrate prize competition
WASHINGTON – Eight ideas were selected from the Stage 1 portion of the More Water, Less Concentrate prize competition. The competition sought innovative concepts to expand usable water supplies by maximizing fresh water production from inland desalination systems in a cost-effective and environmentally sound manner. The solvers will share $150,000. <P> "The demand for fresh water will be increasing, and we need to be able to develop new water supplies from non-traditional water sources, like brackish groundwater and surface water using desalination and novel technologies," Commissioner Brenda Burman said. <P> Currently, significant and desirable water supplies are trapped in concentrate streams that are a byproduct of desalination technologies. The cost to manage or dispose of concentrate is rather large and limiting to utilization of desalination in inland applications. This challenge sought innovative concepts to expand usable water supplies by maximizing fresh water production from inland desalination systems, and thereby reduce the volume of concentrate. <P> The National Academy of Sciences identified developing cost-effective approaches for concentrate management that minimize environmental impacts as one of their highest priority research topics to enable the more widespread use of desalination to expand water supplies in the United States. <P> The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Water Environment and Reuse Foundation, and the Water Research Foundation collaborated with Reclamation on this competition. <P> To advance the concepts developed in Stage 1, Reclamation will be hosting a follow-up competition, seeking working prototypes of innovative technologies to reduce concentrate volumes at inland desalination facilities and increase water supplies. <P> The Stage 1 winners of the More Water, Less Concentrate Prize Competition are: <P> <strong>Lawrence Kearns, Chicago, Illinois</strong> <br /> Kearns’s SunTunnel system uses the favorable environment of a low-cost solar hoop house to improve the performance of evaporation pans and coiled evaporation hoses in high-density arrangements. This system dramatically reduces the land area required to process concentrate. <P> <strong>David Orlebeke, Ridgecrest, California</strong> <br /> Orlebeke proposes to treat reverse osmosis concentrate by utilizing a novel electrolytic oxidation process coupled with sub-micron regenerative diatomaceous earth filtration for conversion and removal of dissolved solids to insoluble oxidized precipitates; conversion of hydrocarbons to base elements; and inactivation of microbial pathogens without requiring the adjustment of pH, temperature, or coagulation chemical agents. <P> <strong>Emily Tow, Jaichander Swaminathan, David Warsinger and John Lienhard, Cambridge, Massachusetts </strong> <br /> This group proposed the use of concentrate from existing reverse osmosis plants that are acidified and then further concentrated using batch reverse osmosis. Batch RO is a variant of the RO process that can enhance water recovery due to its tolerance of adverse fouling conditions, and the team has developed novel configurations with high energy efficiency. <P> <strong>Edem Tsikata, Boston, Massachusetts</strong> <br /> Tsikata’s proposal utilizes electrochemical techniques to reduce fouling of reverse osmosis membranes and concentrate brine. The solution is inexpensive and readily scales to treat several million gallons of water per day. <P> <strong>William B. Krantz and Tzyy Haur Chong, Boulder, Colorado</strong> <br /> Krantz’s High Recovery RO process is a novel technology for treating inland water that has a high total dissolved solids content. It offers the advantages of a significantly increased overall water recovery at a reduced pressure and competitive specific energy consumption. A particular advantage is that it can be retrofitted to existing large-scale water treatment plants. <P> <strong>Tzahi Cath and Johan Vanneste, Golden, Colorado</strong> <br /> Cath’s concept utilizes high recovery membrane distillation with chemical-free mineral recovery. A continuous filter-integrated system design is proposed that can dramatically increase the water recovery and recover valuable minerals. <P> <strong>Amy Childress, Los Angeles, California</strong> <br /> Childress’s objective is to develop and demonstrate the performance of an integrated membrane distillation system using novel membrane materials by using a newly developed operational paradigm and powered by an integrated low-cost energy source. The proposed system will address the main issues that have prevented scale-up of membrane distillation systems for concentrate management. <P> <strong>Zachary Hendren, Durham, North Carolina</strong> <br /> Hendren’s proposed solution is to significantly increase water recovery in desalination systems using electrically conductive membrane distillation. The electric charge repulsion mechanism on the membrane distillation surface can alleviate scaling that would occur on a normal membrane process. <P> For more information about the More Water, Less Concentrate prize competition, visit: <a href="https://go.usa.gov/xneFZ">https://go.usa.gov/xneFZ</a>. <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=61828 Bureau of Reclamation announces fiscal year 2018 WaterSMART Program funding opportunities for water and energy efficiency, small-scale water efficiency, and water marketing strategy projects
WASHINGTON - The Bureau of Reclamation has released three funding opportunities for fiscal year 2018, Water and Energy Efficiency Grants, Small-Scale Water Efficiency Projects and Water Marketing Strategy Grants, all of which are part of the Department of the Interior’s WaterSMART program initiative. <P> Through WaterSMART, Reclamation provides three types of grants. The Water and Energy Efficiency Grants will be awarded to projects that result in quantifiable water savings and those which support broader water reliability benefits. Small-Scale Water Efficiency Projects will be awarded to small-scale water management projects that have been identified through previous planning efforts. Water Marketing Strategy Grants will be awarded to entities exploring actions that can be taken to develop or facilitate water marketing. <P> States, Indian tribes, irrigation districts, water districts, and other organizations with water or power delivery authority located in the Western United States or United States Territories are eligible to apply for these funding opportunities. <P> <blockquote>Applicants for Water and Energy Efficiency Grants must submit their proposals by 4:00 p.m. MDT on Thursday, May 10, 2018. To view this funding opportunity, please visit <a href="https://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> and search for funding opportunity number BOR-DO-18-F006.</blockquote> <P> <blockquote>Applicants for Water Marketing Strategy Grants must submit their proposals by 4:00 p.m. MDT, on Wednesday, July 17, 2018. To view this funding opportunity, please visit <a href="https://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> and search for funding opportunity number BOR-DO-18-F010.</blockquote> <P> <blockquote>Applicants for Small-Scale Water Efficiency Projects must submit their proposals by 4:00pm MDT on Tuesday, July 31, 2018. To view this funding opportunity, please visit <a href="https://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> and search for funding opportunity number BOR-DO-18-F009. </blockquote> <P> The aforementioned project funding opportunities include financial assistance provided by Reclamation under its WaterSMART Grants program, on a 50/50 cost-share basis. To learn more about the WaterSMART Grants program, please visit: <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/">https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/</a>. <P> <P> <P> <P> <P> <P> <P> <P>