Commissioner's Offce News Releases http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom News Releases from Reclamation's Commissioner's Office https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=67963 Reclamation announces grant funding available to develop local water management solutions
WASHINGTON – The Bureau of Reclamation released a grant funding opportunity for communities to establish a new watershed group, expand an existing group and complete restoration planning efforts. The Cooperative Watershed Management Program encourages diverse stakeholders to form local solutions to address their water management needs. <P> A watershed group is a self-sustaining, non-regulatory, consensus-based group that is composed of a diverse array of stakeholders. Membership in a watershed group may include, but is not limited to, private property owners, non-profit organizations, federal, state, or local agencies, and tribes. <P> "This program brings local stakeholders together to collaborate on improving water reliability and management in their community. The intention of this is to facilitate locally driven and consensus-based solutions to complex water issues,” said Reclamation’s Program Manager Robin Graber. <P> Eligible applicants for this grant opportunity must be located in the western United States or a U.S. Territory. Entities in Hawaii and Alaska are also eligible to apply. States, tribes, local and special districts, local government entities, interstate organizations and non-profit organizations are eligible to apply to establish a new group. To expand a watershed management group, an existing watershed group or a participant in an existing watershed group is eligible to apply. <P> Up to $100,000 in federal funding will be available, with no more $50,000 available in each year of the two-year grant. A non-federal cost share is not required. <P> The funding opportunity is available at www.grants.gov by searching for opportunity number BOR-DO-19-F010. The application deadline for 2019 funding is Nov. 13, 2019. <P> The Cooperative Watershed Management Program is part of the WaterSMART Program. Through WaterSMART, Reclamation works cooperatively with states, tribes, and local entities as they plan and implement actions to increase water supply reliability through investments to modernize existing infrastructure and attention to local water conflicts. Visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart">www.usbr.gov/watersmart</a> to learn more. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=67803 Joyce Harris named senior advisor for information assurance, industrial control systems
WASHINGTON – The Bureau of Reclamation announced it has selected Joyce Harris as the senior advisor for information assurance, industrial control systems. Harris will serve as the lead on intergovernmental initiatives and requirements associated with cybersecurity of facilities and systems related to hydropower delivery. <P> "Attacks against critical infrastructure systems are on the rise, increasing the risks to Reclamation's water and power systems throughout the West," said Director of Information Resources Karla Smiley. "Joyce has the necessary experience and background to lead this new office dedicated to protecting these critical networks." <P> Harris is currently Reclamation's chief information security officer where she leads Reclamation's information technology and industrial control system cybersecurity program including personnel, budget, policy enforcement, incident response and security awareness. She also leads a staff of highly technical cybersecurity specialists. <P> After several years in the private sector, she began her federal career with the Bureau of Land Management in 2007 as an information technology security specialist before joining Reclamation in 2010 to perform a similar role and serve as the North American Electric Reliability Council Critical Infrastructure Program compliance manager. In this position, she led internal security assessments, advised senior management on security issues, performed incident response activities, and led external audit activities. <P> Harris graduated from Metropolitan State University of Denver, Summa Cum Laude, with a Bachelor of Arts in Computer Information Systems/Political Science/Public Administration. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=67743 Reclamation selects 63 projects to receive $4.1 million to improve water efficiency and reliability
WASHINGTON – The Bureau of Reclamation has selected 63 projects to receive a total of $4.1 million for small-scale water efficiency grants. The grants will help the water entities use water more efficiently and improve water supply reliability in the western United States. <P> "This WaterSMART program improves water conservation and reliability for communities throughout the West," said Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman. "This cost-shared funding is providing an opportunity for these water providers and tribes to invest in using their water more efficiently." <P> Projects in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Utah and Washington will receive funding. For example, <ul> <li>The Central Colorado Water Conservancy District in Greeley, Colorado, will receive $75,000 to install supervisory control and data acquisition devices on 120 irrigation wells in northeast Colorado.</li> <li>The Pueblo of Zia in northern New Mexico will receive $70,320 to install 40 radio-read water meters at currently unmetered homes to access accurate water usage data.</li> <li>The Quincy-Columbia Basin Irrigation District in Quincy, Washington, will receive $23,130 to upgrade a turnout gate to an automated gate that will enable automatic adjustments to flows for more reliable water deliveries to farms.</li> </ul> <P> Under this funding opportunity, applicants can request up to $75,000 in Reclamation funding and must contribute a non-federal cost-share of at least 50% of total project costs. Learn more at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/swep/">https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/swep/</a>. <P> Small-Scale Water Efficiency Projects are part of the WaterSMART Program. Through WaterSMART, Reclamation works cooperatively with states, tribes, and local entities as they plan and implement actions to increase water supply reliability through investments to modernize existing infrastructure and attention to local water conflicts. Visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart">www.usbr.gov/watersmart</a> to learn more. <P> <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=67623 Reclamation awards $3.4 million to 19 tribes for technical assistance in water development
WASHINGTON — The Bureau of Reclamation is awarding $3.4 million to 19 tribes across the western United States for technical assistance as they develop, manage, and protect their water and related resources. The funding is being made available through Reclamation's Native American Affairs Technical Assistance to Tribes Program. <P> "This funding provides the opportunity for Reclamation and the tribes to collaborate in finding the most effective and efficient ways to improve water reliability for these tribal communities," said Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman. <P> The funding will be provided to the tribes as grants or cooperative agreements. The nineteen projects selected are: <P> <strong>Arizona</strong><br /> <ul> <li>Hopi Tribe, develop georeferenced base maps of community water systems, $200,000</li> <li>Quechan Indian Tribe, Tonawanda Lateral Structure Replacement, $171,346</li> <li>Yavapai-Apache Tribe, domestic water system infrastructure and repair, $200,000</li> </ul> <P> <strong>California</strong><br /> <ul> <li>Bear River Band of the Rohnerville Rancheria, Singley Hill well production and treatment facilities, $200,000</li> <li>Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians, water supply well completion, $98,746</li> <li>Cahto Tribe of the Laytonville Rancheria, baseline stream monitoring and planning, $200,000</li> <li>Colusa Community Council, community water system improvements, $200,000</li> <li>Fort Independence Community of Paiute Indians, S7-3 Lateral Irrigation Improvement Project, $200,000</li> <li>La Jolla Band of Luiseno Indians, drinking water supply improvements, $65,299</li> <li>Hoopa Valley Indian Tribe, assess threats to drinking water supply, $181,980</li> <li>Pinoleville Pomo Nation, Ackerman Creek environmental streamflow conservation projects, $194,303</li> <li>Quartz Valley Indian Community, water resource management model, $159,022</li> <li>Round Valley Indian Tribes, groundwater model for basin-wide groundwater management plan, $200,000</li> </ul> <P> <strong>Idaho</strong><br /> <ul> <li>Coeur D’Alene Tribe, water quality monitoring and assessment of Lake Coeur D’Alene, $195,979</li> <li>Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, irrigation project surface water management program, $200,000</li> </ul> <P> <strong>Oklahoma</strong><br /> <ul> <li>Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, process improvements for failing water treatment plants in Choctaw Territory, $197,637</li> <li>Osage Nation, water system assessment project, $199,973</li> </ul> <P> <strong>Oregon</strong><br /> <ul> <li>Klamath Tribes, Sprague River watershed nutrient assessment, $96,168</li> </ul> <P> <strong>Washington</strong><br /> <ul> <li>Snoqualmie Indian Tribe, Upper Snoqualmie River resilient water corridor management plan, $199,995 </li> <li>Stillaquamish Tribe of Indians of Washington, water resources program development, $200,000</li> </ul> <P> The Native American and International Affairs Office in the Commissioner's Office serves as the central coordination point for the Native American Affairs Program and lead for policy guidance for Native American issues in Reclamation. To learn more, please visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/native">www.usbr.gov/native</a>. <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=67483 Reclamation launches prize competition to protect steel structures
WASHINGTON — The Bureau of Reclamation is launching a new prize competition today, dubbed Rust Busters. This competition is stage 2 of a long-term corrosion protection competition that seeks new, improved or lower-cost solution that can be prototyped to better protect steel structures from corrosion. Many hydraulic steel structures need continuous corrosion protection, but some past methods have been abandoned due to safety and environmental concerns. Many newer protection methods do not last as long, are less effective or come with much higher costs. <P> This competition builds upon stage 1, completed in 2017, which sought written theoretical ideas for long-term corrosion protection for hydraulic steel structures. Stage 2 hopes to advance those ideas from the Stage 1 effort and seeks additional concepts that solvers can prototype and submit for further testing and evaluation as part of the competition. <P> "Reclamation has many miles of hydraulic steel pipelines, gates and penstocks in and around our dams and powerplants," said Reclamation Science Advisor David Raff. "Finding a way to reduce the maintenance costs of these structures while increasing the life of a protection system will be a great benefit to Reclamation and its customers." <P> Stage 2 of the competition is divided into two phases. Phase I seeks innovative ideas to protect hydraulic steel structures for more than 50 years with minimal maintenance and at relatively low cost, the scientific backing for their idea, and any supporting data to support their proposed solution. The first phase winners will be invited to participate in phase II, where they will prototype their approach on steel samples supplied by Reclamation. Once evaluated, three final winners will be selected to share $100,000. <P> Reclamation is conducting this challenge through an ongoing partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and a new partnership with the NASA Tournament Labs. The competition is being managed by HeroX. Learn more at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/research/challenges/corrosion.html">https://www.usbr.gov/research/challenges/corrosion.html</a>. <P> Reclamation conducts prize competitions to spur innovation by engaging a non-traditional, problem solver community. Through prize competitions, Reclamation complements traditional design research to target the most persistent science and technology challenges. It has awarded more than $1,000,000 in prizes through 20 competitions in the past 5 years. Please visit Reclamation's <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/research/challenges/index.html">Water Prize Competition Center</a> to learn more. <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=67463 Reclamation awards $16.98 million to five projects for water recycling and reuse in California, Hawaii and Texas
WASHINGTON — The Bureau of Reclamation will provide a total of $16.98 million to five communities in California, Hawaii and Texas to help plan, design and construct congressionally authorized Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Projects. Title XVI is part of Reclamation’s WaterSMART Program that focuses on improving water conservation and helping water-resource managers across the West to make sound decisions about water use. <P> "The Title XVI program is successful in helping communities to look beyond the traditional surface or groundwater sources," said Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman. "This program allows communities to diversify their water supply—exploring water reuse, recycling and other techniques while improving efficiency and flexibility during water shortages." <P> This funding is only available to the sponsors of the 53 congressionally authorized Title XVI projects, provided that they have not reached their statutory federal funding ceiling. The five projects selected are expected to produce 130,316 acre-feet, or 42 billion gallons, of water annually. This is enough water to support more than 521,000 people each year. The selected projects are: <P> <strong>Padre Dam Municipal Water District, San Diego Area Water Reclamation Program, $778,002.75</strong><br /> The Padre Dam Municipal Water District, which provides water, wastewater, recycled water and recreation services to 100,000 residents in the San Diego suburbs of Santee, El Cajon, Lakeside Flinn Springs, Harbison Canyon, Blossom Valley, Alpine, Dehesa and Crest—is implementing the Phase I Water Recycling Project. It includes the expansion of the Ray Stoyer Reclamation Facility, construction of a new advanced water purification facility, potable reuse conveyance pipelines, a product water pump station, and a biosolids digestion facility to offset energy demands of the project. It will create 3,900 acre-feet, or 127 million gallons, per year of potable water by capturing wastewater flows that would otherwise be discharged to the ocean. <P> <strong>City of San Diego, San Diego Area Water Reclamation Program, $10,361,379</strong><br /> The San Diego Area Water Reclamation Program, part of the Pure Water Program, is a phased, multi-year program. By 2035 the program will make 93,000 acre-feet, or 30 billion gallons, of water available per year. This constitutes about 30% of the City of San Diego's water supply. This project will provide the city with a new reliable source of potable water and will reduce the amount of wastewater that is released into the ocean. The funding will be used to complete the final design of the project. <P> <strong>Rancho California Water District, Rancho California Water District Project, $1,727,960</strong><br /> The Rancho California Water District, which provides water and wastewater services near Temecula/Rancho, California, will implement components of its Demineralization and Non-Potable Conversion Program. The funding will be used for the design, materials, and construction activities to convert 54 irrigation sites to accept non-potable recycled water. The funding will also support activities before construction of a small-scale recycled groundwater recharge facility. It is expected to save 18,400 acre-feet, or nearly 6 billion gallons, of water per year. <P> <strong>County of Hawaii, Hawaii Reclamation Projects, $614,468.68</strong><br /> The County of Hawaii will conduct planning activities to evaluate upgrading the Kealakehe Wastewater Treatment Plan to implement water recycling for landscape and recreation applications. It will involve the necessary improvements to the existing secondary treatment process so that the wastewater treatment plant can produce water suitable for reuse per state guidelines. The project is expected to result in recycled water deliveries of 2,016 acre-feet, or 6.5 million gallons, per year. <P> <strong>El Paso Water Utilities Public Service Board, El Paso Water Reclamation and Reuse Project, $3,500,000</strong><br /> The El Paso Water Utilities Public Service Board, located in El Paso Texas, will construct an advanced water purification facility to treat wastewater for potable reuse. The treated water will be conveyed directly to the city's distribution system, making this facility the first large-scale, direct-to-distribution potable reuse project in the United States. The funding announced today will be used for a pilot facility and to complete preliminary, detailed and final design phases for the full-scale project. Once finished, the project will produce 13,000 acre-feet, or 4.2 billion gallons, per year. <P> To learn more about the Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Program or view more detailed information about the projects selected, please visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/title/">www.usbr.gov/watersmart/title/</a>. <P> Through WaterSMART, Reclamation works cooperatively with states, tribes, and local entities as they plan and implement actions to increase water supply reliability through investments to modernize existing infrastructure and attention to local water conflicts. Visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart">www.usbr.gov/watersmart</a> to learn more. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=67305 Reclamation announces grant funding opportunity for drought resiliency projects in 2020 and 2021
WASHINGTON — The Bureau of Reclamation announced that it is making grant funding available to assist communities build long-term resilience for future droughts. Part of the WaterSMART Drought Response Program, this funding opportunity is for projects in 2020 and 2021. <P> "Drought across the West is more of a norm than an exception today that severely impacts everyone and everything," said Commissioner Burman. "These grants show Reclamation's commitment to supporting western communities as they build drought resiliency through innovation, investment and collaboration." <P> Eligible applicants for funding include states, tribes, irrigation districts, water districts or other organizations with water or power delivery authority located in the western United States or U.S. territories. New this year, projects in Alaska and Hawaii are also eligible. <P> Funding is available for projects that: <ul> <li>Increase the reliability of water supplies through infrastructure improvements</li> <li>Improve water management through decision support tools, modeling and measurement</li> <li>Provide protection for fish, wildlife and the environment.</li> </ul> <P> Up to $300,000 per agreement is available for a project that can be completed within two years. Up to $750,000 per agreement is available for a project that can be completed within three years. Recipients must match the funding with a minimum of 50% non-federal cost-share. <P> "While many areas across the West have received good snow pack and more plentiful water supplies this year, some areas were not so lucky. As each of us knows, this could be a one-year blip. We need to take advantage of this break to plan and prepare for the next drought. This reminds us that drought planning, in advance of a crisis, is far more cost-effective than addressing it during the drought," said Reclamation’s Drought Response Program Manager Darion Mayhorn. <P> Applications are due on October 16, 2019, for projects in 2020. Applications are due on October 14, 2020, for projects in 2021. Learn more at <a href="https://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> by searching for funding opportunity number BOR-DO-20-F002. <P> Visit Reclamation's WaterSMART program at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart">www.usbr.gov/watersmart</a> and the Drought Response Program at <a href="www.usbr.gov/drought">www.usbr.gov/drought</a>. <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=67304 Reclamation funds local watershed projects in Montana, Oklahoma and Idaho
WASHINGTON — The Bureau of Reclamation will provide a total of $331,792 to three groups who will undertake collaborative, on-the-ground watershed management projects. The funding will help address critical water supply needs, water quality concerns, restoration needs, meet competing demands and avoid conflicts over water. The Reclamation funding will be leveraged to support $1.2 million in watershed management improvements. <P> "Collaboration is key to addressing critical water supply needs," said Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman. "Tackling on-the-ground projects in partnership with local communities will help ensure that these watersheds remain healthy and productive into the future." <P> Under this funding opportunity, applicants can request up to $300,000 in Reclamation funding and must contribute a non-Federal cost-share of 50% of total project costs. The three projects selected are: <P> <ul> <li><strong>Lower French Creek Sediment Reduction, Big Hole Watershed Committee (Montana)</strong> - The Big Hole Watershed Committee based in Divide, Montana, will receive $86,610 to complete the Lower French Creek Sediment Reduction Project. It was developed in partnership with the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks. The project will reroute a 4,000 linear foot reach of French Creek that is currently pinned between an eroding bank and linear gravel piles, leading to an annual deposition of an estimated 800 tons of sediment into French Creek. This will improve the river’s flow and will create important habitat for fish and other aquatic creatures.</li> <li><strong>Implementation of the Lake of the Arbuckles Watershed Restoration Plan, Lake of the Arbuckles Watershed Association, Inc. (Oklahoma)</strong> - The Lake of the Arbuckles Watershed Association based in Sulphur, Oklahoma, will receive $89,000 to implement best management practices with the Lake of the Arbuckles watershed. This will result in water quality and quantity improvement for the basin and the entire community.</li> <li><strong>Middle Snake River Tributary Sedimentation and Phosphorus Ponds, Southern Idaho Water Quality Coalition (Idaho)</strong> - The Southern Idaho Water Quality Coalition based in Twin Falls, Idaho, will receive $156,182 to construct a series of sediment and phosphorus removal ponds on the O Coulee Canal and the Auger Falls Lateral 43 Canal. The project is expected to prevent approximately 1,150 tons of sediment and 2,385 pounds of phosphorus from entering the Snake River annually and will help the Twin Falls Canal company meet their reduction requirement under the Snake River Total Maximum Load Management Plan. This will improve water quality for the Snake River.</li> </ul> To learn more about the Cooperative Watershed Management Program or view detailed information about the projects selected, please visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/cwmp/">www.usbr.gov/watersmart/cwmp/</a>. Through WaterSMART, Reclamation works cooperatively with states, tribes, and local entities as they plan and implement actions to increase water supply reliability through investments to modernize existing infrastructure and attention to local water conflicts. Visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart">www.usbr.gov/watersmart</a> to learn more. <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=67303 Reclamation announces funding opportunity grants to improve water reliability and energy efficiency
WASHINGTON — The Bureau of Reclamation has announced that it is making grant funding available as part of the WaterSMART Water and Energy Efficiency Grant Program. Through water and energy efficiency grants, Reclamation provides funding to undertake projects that result in quantifiable and sustained water savings, increase the production of hydropower and support broader water reliability benefits. This funding opportunity is for projects in 2020 and 2021. <P> "We’ve seen drought severely impact local, western communities," said Commissioner Burman. "Through Water and Energy Efficiency Grants, water districts are partnering with Reclamation on the construction of water conservation and hydropower projects, one of the priorities of this administration to modernize our infrastructure." <P> Eligible applicants for funding include states, tribes, irrigation districts, water districts or other organizations with water or power delivery authority located in the western United States or United States territories. Alaska and Hawaii are also eligible to apply. <P> Federal funding is available in two groups. In the first group, up to $300,000 per agreement is available for a project that can be completed within two years. In the second group, up to $1.5 million per agreement is available for a project that can be completed within three years. Recipients must match the funding with a minimum of 50% cost-share. <P> "Water entities can leverage their money and resources through this program to conserve and use water more efficiently," said Reclamation’s WaterSMART program manager Joshua German. "Some of the projects will facilitate future on-farm improvements and may be eligible for funding from the Natural Resources Conservation Service through their Environmental Quality Incentives Program." <P> There are two closing dates for the funding opportunity. For projects in 2020, applications are due on October 3, 2019. After this date, applications will be considered for 2021 and will be due on September 30, 2020. Learn more at www.grants.gov by searching for funding opportunity number BOR-DO-20-F001. <P> This funding opportunity supports the Presidential Memorandum on Promoting the Reliable Supply and Delivery of Water in the West. To learn more, visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart">www.usbr.gov/watersmart</a>. <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=67183 Federal Officials Announce Priority Actions Supporting Long-Term Drought Resilience
WASHINGTON — Today, senior administration officials participated in the Second National Drought Forum where they announced Priority Actions Supporting Long-Term Drought Resilience. This document outlines key ways in which federal agencies support state, tribal and local efforts to protect the security of our food supply, the integrity of critical infrastructure, the resilience of our economy, and the health and safety of our people and ecosystems. <P> The document was developed by the National Drought Resilience Partnership (NDRP), a federal collaborative formed to promote long-term drought resilience nationwide. While authority lies with the states to manage water resources, federal agencies play a key role in supporting states, tribes, communities, agriculture, industry, and the private sector owners and operators of critical national infrastructure to prepare for, mitigate against, respond to, and recover from drought. <P> The following statements were released after today’s panel: <P> "Under the leadership of President Trump, we are taking unprecedented steps at the federal level to coordinate and empower states, tribes, local communities, and water users to promote drought preparedness and resiliency and ensure reliable water supply throughout the West. The U.S. Geological Survey and Bureau of Reclamation play integral parts in this, whether it's the science or infrastructure piece of this equation," <strong>said U.S. Department of the Interior Assistant Secretary for Water and Science Dr. Tim Petty</strong>. <P> "The Western states have experienced intense drought with the potential to severely impact agriculture, municipal water supplies and hydropower production. We’ve demonstrated that infrastructure investments, innovative approaches to conservation, and collaboration build drought resiliency and reduces risks," <strong>said Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman</strong>. <P> "We know we can accomplish more when we work together, and the National Drought Resilience Partnership facilitates collaboration among federal partners to help the country respond to drought and to prepare for the future" <strong>said U.S. Department of Agriculture Under Secretary for Farm Production and Conservation Bill Northey</strong>. "These priorities are a large part of our game plan to how we can protect our food and water supply, and to build resilience on our farms and ranches and in our communities and businesses" <P> "The impact of drought on public health and the environment is far reaching because it reduces both water quantity and water quality," <strong>said U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Assistant Administrator for Water David Ross</strong>. "Through EPA initiatives, such as the National Water Reuse Action Plan, we are working to ensure a sufficient supply of clean water for the American people." <P> “Water quality and availability is a national issue and it is one that affects every American. Through this partnership, the data produced by the U.S. Geological Survey will be integrated into a comprehensive framework of information sharing that is flexible and responsive to the nation's decision-makers, ensuring every community understands drought preparedness, mitigation, and resiliency," <strong>said U.S. Geological Survey Director James Reilly</strong>. <P> "The National Drought Resilience Partnership is essential to the continued collaboration amongst federal agencies regarding the nation's water resources. I am committed to this partnership and will ensure the Corps' support to other agencies as they work drought-related issues and coordinate to reduce duplicative and redundant efforts," <strong>said U.S. Department of Army Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works Ricky "R.D." James</strong>. <P> “The National Drought Resilience Partnership is inspiring action across the federal government. DOE is pleased to collaborate with other agencies to stimulate American innovation and technology solutions that address drought resilience through the Water Security Grand Challenge and other activities,” <strong>said U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Daniel Simmons</strong>. <P> The NDRP and the document released today focus on fostering a national dialogue about how federal agencies can support these entities in building a more drought-resilient nation for sufficient water quality and quantity and a vibrant economy at the local level. NDRP categorizes its drought resilience efforts along six goal areas, which provide a framework to systematically address how the federal government supports building long-term drought resilience: <ol> <li>Data Collection and Integration</li> <li>Communicating Drought Risk to Critical Infrastructure</li> <li>Drought Planning and Capacity Building</li> <li>Coordination of Drought Activity</li> <li>Market-based Approaches for Infrastructure and Efficiency</li> <li>Innovative Water Use, Efficiency, and Technology</li> </ol> <P> <h3>Background</h3> Established in 2016, the NDRP is comprised of federal agencies that work together to leverage technical and financial federal resources, strengthen communication, and foster collaboration among its members to productively support state, tribal, and local efforts to build, protect, and sustain drought resilience capacity at regional and basin scales. <P> <strong>The NDRP co-chairs are the Department of Agriculture and Environmental Protection Agency</strong>. The additional interagency NDRP Member Agencies and offices include the Department of Defense; the Department of the Interior (DOI); the Department of Commerce; the Department of Energy; the Department of Homeland Security (DHS); the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works; the Office of Management and Budget; the Office of Science and Technology Policy; the National Economic Council; the Council on Environmental Quality; the National Security Council staff; and such other agencies or offices as the agencies set forth above, by consensus, deem appropriate. Currently, other offices include: the Office of Water Prediction, the National Weather Service, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Integrated Drought Information System, which all are within the Department of Commerce; the Bureau of Reclamation and the United States Geological Survey, within the DOI; National Aeronautics and Space Administration; DHS Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency – National Risk Management Center; the Centers for Disease Control; and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Member agencies collaborate to ensure successful outcomes with maximum efficiency and minimal duplication. <P> <P> <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=66943 Reclamation awards $5.1 million in research for new ways to desalinate and treat water
WASHINGTON — The Bureau of Reclamation announced that 30 projects will receive $5.1 million from the Desalination and Water Purification Research Program to develop improved and inexpensive ways to desalinate and treat impaired water. <P> “We are awarding grants to a diverse group of projects to reduce the cost, energy consumption and environmental impacts of treating impaired or otherwise unusable water for local communities across the country,” said Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman. “This funding is a direct result of the Trump Administration’s commitment to increase water supply and delivery through improved technology.” Twenty-five awards are for laboratory-scale projects, which are typically bench scale studies involving small flow rates. They are used to determine the viability of a novel process, new materials or process modifications. Awards are limited to $150,000. <P> Five projects are selected as pilot-scale proposals, which test a novel process at a sufficiently large-scale to determine the technical, practical and economic viability of the process. Awards are limited to $400,000 and no more than $200,000 per year. <P> Types of projects funded include modeling, testing new materials such as nanomaterials, and improvements on known technologies such as distillation and electrodialysis. Projects are funded in the following states: <P> <table width="100%" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"> <P> <tr> <td width="25%">Alabama</td> <td width="25%">Florida</td> <td width="25%">Massachusetts</td> <td width="25%">Oklahoma</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="25%">Arizona</td> <td width="25%">Georgia</td> <td width="25%">New Jersey</td> <td width="25%">Texas</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="25%">California</td> <td width="25%">Hawaii</td> <td width="25%">New Mexico</td> <td width="25%">Pennsylvania</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="25%">Colorado</td> <td width="25%">Illinois</td> <td width="25%">New York</td> <td width="25%">Virginia</td> </tr> <P> </table> <P> More detail on each project is available at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/research/dwpr">www.usbr.gov/research/dwpr</a>. <P> <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=66803 Janet White named Engineering & Laboratory Services Division Chief
DENVER — The Bureau of Reclamation announced the selection of Janet White, P.E., as chief of Engineering and Laboratory Services Division for the Technical Service Center, which operates a world-class materials and hydraulic engineering laboratory in Denver, Colorado. White will start her new position on July 7, 2019. <P> “Ms. White has more than 27 years of experience as a concrete engineer and is considered a technical expert in the concrete industry, said Tom Luebke, director of the Technical Service Center. “She approaches her work, regardless of the role, by rolling up her sleeves, collaborating with others, and doing whatever it takes to ensure a task is done correctly.” <P> White joined Reclamation in 2011 as a civil engineer and has served as the manager of the Concrete, Geotechnical and Structural Laboratory for the past four years. During her tenure, she successfully led the multidisciplinary group that provides structural testing, concrete repair and specialized material testing for concrete, soils, and rock used for Reclamation structures. <P> As engineering and laboratory services division chief, White will lead the following groups: the Materials & Corrosion Laboratory, which provides expertise in engineering materials selection; the Hydraulic Investigations & Laboratory Services, which applies hydraulic modeling, analysis and field-testing expertise; and the Concrete, Geotechnical and Structural Laboratory, which provides expertise on engineering materials. <P> White has 19 years of private industry experience, including management positions in a ready-mixed concrete business and as president of a consulting business specializing in concrete. Professional achievements include becoming the first woman president of the Colorado Ready Mixed Concrete Association in 2002. <P> White earned a Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering from the University of Colorado and has been a registered professional engineer in Colorado since 1998. She is an endurance athlete and has competed in ultra-marathons and a full Ironman triathlon. <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=66783 Reclamation announces $29.1 million in WaterSMART grants to use water more efficiently
WASHINGTON —The Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Reclamation announced that 13 states will utilize $29.1 million in grants from the WaterSMART Program to help communities conserve water. <P> “Existing water and hydropower resources are being strained as our infrastructure ages and population grows. The WaterSMART program provides critical support to western communities, helping to best conserve limited water resources,” said <strong>Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt</strong>. <P> Forty-five projects will be funded based on two categories. In the first category, 28 projects from 11 states were selected to share $7.5 million with each project receiving up to $300,000 in federal funding and having a completion timeframe of less than two years. The second category consists of 17 projects from seven states, sharing $21.5 million. These projects are receiving up to $1.5 million in federal funding and will be completed within three years. <P> “These water and energy efficiency grants help increase hydropower production and contribute to water supply reliability in the western United States,” said <strong>Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman</strong>. "WaterSMART is an opportunity for communities to use water more effectively and reduce risk for future water conflict.” <P> Projects in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming were selected to receive grants. Examples of projects that are receiving funding include replacing unlined canals with pipe or a lining, installing flow measurement for real-time monitoring of water deliveries, advanced meters for residences that will help inform them about water use, or improving irrigation scheduling by installing moisture probes and irrigation system monitoring. <P> The Colorado River Indian Tribes in southwest Arizona will use $250,000 of federal funding with $250,000 of its own funding to modernize its Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition system to enable enhanced irrigation water control and management. The project is expected to result in annual water savings of 10,000 acre-feet that is currently lost to operational spills and evaporation. <P> The Grand Valley Water Users Association, near Grand Junction, Colorado, will combine $178,884 in federal funding with $220,000 of its own funding to implement several improvements at Roller Dam to collect more accurate and reliable diversion and measurement information. The project is expected to save 4,000 acre-feet of water every year and will result in reduced diversions from the Colorado River, benefitting a critical stretch of river known as the 15 Mile Reach, which is designated critical habitat for many fish species. <P> The Mission Springs Water District, located in southern California, will combine $300,000 in federal funding with $3.4 million of its own funding to upgrade 12,967 residential water meters to advanced meters that help inform about leaks, breaks and other unusual use patterns. The project is expected to result in annual water savings of 549 acre-feet, which will reduce the amount of water pumped from the Coachella Valley Groundwater Basin. <P> Some projects complement on-farm improvements that can be carried out with the assistance of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service to accomplish coordinated water conservation improvements. A number of the projects selected today are expected to help make additional on-farm improvements possible in the future, including the West Cache Irrigation Company located in northern Utah. They will combine $400,000 in federal funding with $520,000 of their own funding to convert 2.25 miles of the earthen South Fields Canal to a pressurized pipeline. The project is expected to result in water savings of 1,222 acre-feet annually. Once completed, irrigators will be able to take advantage of the newly pressurized system to complete on-farm improvements, potentially funded by the NRCS through its Environmental Quality Incentives Program, such as converting from flood irrigation to more efficient sprinkler irrigation. <P> Learn more about all of the selected projects at <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/weeg">www.usbr.gov/watersmart/weeg</a>. <P> Through WaterSMART, Reclamation works cooperatively with states, tribes, and local entities as they plan for and implement actions to increase water supply reliability through investments to modernize existing infrastructure and attention to local water conflicts. Visit <a href="https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart">www.usbr.gov/watersmart</a> to learn more. <P> <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=66763 Reclamation makes funding available for applied science grant projects to inform water management decisions
WASHINGTON — The Bureau of Reclamation is releasing an applied science grant funding opportunity for non-federal entities to cost-share on projects to develop hydrologic information and water management tools and improve modeling and forecasting capabilities. <P> Project results must be readily applicable by water managers and include tools and information that can be used to support water supply reliability, management of water deliveries, water marketing activities, drought management activities, conjunctive use of ground and surface water, water rights administration, ability to meet endangered species requirements, watershed health, conservation and efficiency and other water management objectives. <P> "Improving the information and tools for water managers is important for Reclamation as it supports water supply reliability efforts throughout the western United States," said Reclamation Program Coordinator Avra Morgan. <P> Federal funding will not exceed 50-percent of the total project cost. Funding is available in two categories. <P> <ul> <li>Funding Group I: Up to $150,000 in federal funds per agreement provided through this funding opportunity for projects that generally should be completed in two years.</li> <li>Funding Group II: Up to $300,000 in federal funds per agreement provided through this funding opportunity for projects that generally should be completed in three years.</li> </ul> <P> Those eligible to apply for this funding opportunity are states, tribes, irrigation districts, water districts, or other organizations with water or power delivery authority located in the western United States, U.S. Territories, Alaska or Hawaii. Universities, non-profit research organizations and nonprofit organizations are eligible to apply but must partner with an organization as outlined in the funding opportunity. <P> This funding opportunity has two submittal periods. Proposals received before October 30, 2019, 4:00 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time. This funding opportunity will be updated to provide a second application deadline in fiscal year 2020 for proposals to be considered for fiscal year 2020 funding, contingent on appropriations. The funding opportunity is available at www.grants.gov by searching for funding opportunity number BOR-DO-19-F012. <P> To learn more about Applied Science Grants, please visit https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/appliedscience. <P> For more than 100 years, Reclamation and its partners have worked to develop a sustainable water and power future for the West. This program is part of the Department of the Interior's WaterSMART Program, which focuses on improving water conservation and reliability while helping water resource managers make sound decisions about water use. To find out more information about Reclamation's WaterSMART program, visit https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart. <P> This funding opportunity also supports the President's memorandum on Promoting the Reliable Supply and Delivery of Water in the West. <P> <P>
https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=66743 Bureau of Reclamation releases funding opportunity for water reclamation and reuse research studies
WASHINGTON — The Bureau of Reclamation is releasing a funding opportunity for entities to submit research proposals that address water supply challenges by establishing or expanding the use of water reclamation and reuse, improving existing water reuse facilities, and/or streamlining the implementation of state-of-the-art technology for new facilities. <P> "Helping communities study how they can implement water reclamation and reuse into their water management portfolio will enable a broader use of recycled water," said Reclamation’s Title XVI Program Coordinator Amanda Erath. <P> Funding is available in three categories. <P> <ul> <li><strong>Funding Group I</strong>: Desktop research studies to develop science and decision-support tools to assist communities in decision-making related to implementing or expanding water reclamation projects. Up to $150,000 in federal funding is available per project.</li> <li><strong>Funding Group II</strong>: Research studies focused on improvements to existing facilities that could be implemented at the research study sponsor’s location but that also may include broad benefits for the industry. Up to $300,000 in federal funding is available per project.</li> <li><strong>Funding Group III</strong>: Research studies that focus on state-of-the-art technology verification at a new proposed location or community that may also result in broader benefits for the industry. Up to $750,000 in federal funding is available per project.</li> </ul> <P> Those eligible to apply for this funding opportunity are state, regional or local authorities; Indian tribes or tribal organizations; or entities such as a water district, wastewater district or rural water district. Applicants must be located in the western United States, a United States Territory or Hawaii. Applicants must be willing to provide at least 75-percent or more of the total project cost. <P> The funding opportunity is available at www.grants.gov by searching for funding opportunity number BOR-DO-19-F009. It will close on September 23, 2019. <P> <P> <P>