About Us

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Jeffrey Nettleton , Area Manager
Klamath Basin Area Office
U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
6600 Washburn
Klamath Falls, OR 97603

History

Irrigation of agricultural lands in the area now comprising the Klamath Project was initiated in 1882 with construction of an irrigation ditch to the land from White Lake. Private interests further developed the project by constructing the Adams Canal in 1886, which was supplied also from White Lake, and the Ankeny Canal in 1887, which diverted water from Link River. By 1903, approximately 13,000 acres were irrigated by private interests.

Investigations

In 1903, the Reclamation Service made investigations which led in 1904 to the first withdrawal of land by the Secretary of the Interior for developing a Federal irrigation project. Early in 1905, California and Oregon ceded certain rights in Upper and Lower Klamath Lakes and Tule Lake to the United States. On May 1, 1905, a board of engineers made a report that served as the basis for authorization.

Authorization

The Secretary of the Interior authorized development of the project on May 15, 1905, under provisions of the Reclamation Act of 1902 (32 Stat. 388).

Construction

Construction began on the project in 1906 with the building of the main `A` Canal. Water was first made available May 22, 1907, to the lands now known as the Main Division. This initial construction was followed by the completion of Clear Lake Dam in 1910, the Lost River Diversion Dam and many of the distribution structures in 1912, and the Lower Lost River Diversion Dam in 1921. (In 1970, a public dedication at the Lower Lost River Diversion Dam officially changed the name of the structure to Anderson-Rose Diversion Dam.)

  • The Malone Diversion Dam on Lost River was built in 1923 to divert water to Langell Valley.
  • The Gerber Dam on Miller Creek was completed in 1925;
  • the Miller Diversion Dam was built in 1924 to divert water released from Gerber Dam.

A contract executed February 24, 1917, between the California-Oregon Power Company (now the Pacific Power and Light Company) and the United States authorized the company to construct Link River Dam for the benefit of the project and for the company`s use, and in particular extended to the water users of the Klamath Project certain preferential power rates. The dam was completed in 1921. The contract was amended and further extended for a 50-year period on April 16, 1956

Canals, Laterals, and Drains

There are 19 canals that total 185 miles and have diversion capacities ranging from 35 to 1,150 cubic feet per second. Laterals total 490 miles and drains 545 miles.

Pumping Plants

There are 3 major pumping plants with power input ranging from 1,120 to 3,650 horsepower and capacities from 60 to 388 cubic feet per second, and 33 pumping plants of less than 1,000 horsepower. Two pumping plants are under construction, each with 750 horsepower and capacity of 300 cubic feet per second.

Operating Agencies

Clear Lake Dam, Gerber Dam, and the Lost River Diversion Dam are operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The Link River Dam is operated by the Pacific Power and Light Company in accordance with project needs. The Anderson-Rose Diversion Dam is operated by the Tulelake Irrigation District, and the Langell Valley Irrigation District operates the Malone and Miller Diversion Dams. The canals and pumping plants are operated by the various irrigation districts.

 

 

Last Updated: 6/8/17