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The Fisheries and Wildlife Resources Group
Equipment

Mike Horn, Group Manager, mhorn@usbr.gov, 303-445-2203

The Fisheries and Wildlife Resources Group uses state of the art technology, equipment, and instrumentation to solve your environmental monitoring, research, and regulatory issues. Scroll down or jump to sections by clicking below:

Fish Sampling and Tracking Gear
Water Quality Sampling Gear
Aquaculture, Fish Rearing and Holding
Fishery Control Structures - Hydraulic Flume
Video, Acoustic. and Microscope Camera Technology
Computerized Instrumentation and Analysis Tools


Fish Sampling and Tracking Gear

The 23-ft Parker cabin cruiser on Bighorn Lake, Montana, outfitted with multiple vertical gill nets for a fish survey
Left - The 23-ft Parker cabin cruiser on Bighorn Lake, Montana, outfitted with multiple vertical gill nets for a fish survey.
Right - An 18-ft aluminum jet boat designed for shallow draft river and shallow lake environmental field work. Here, biologists Rick Wydowski (left) and Eric Best prepare to conduct a razorback sucker survey in the Colorado River at Park Moabi, near Needles, California.
An 18-ft aluminum jet boat designed for shallow draft river and shallow lake environmental field work.
One of our inflatable rafts shoving off into the Rio Grande River, New Mexico, for an electrofishing survey. These boats are rated for white water conditions.
Left - One of our inflatable rafts shoving off into the Rio Grande River, New Mexico, for an electrofishing survey. These boats are rated for white water conditions.


Right -
Fishery Biologist Cathy Karp leads a seine netting team to collect fish for a population study in the Yakima River, Washington.

Biologist Sue Camp of the Montana Area Office with a vertical gill net mounted on the 23-ft Parker cabin cruiser on Bighorn Lake in Montana.

Right - Biologist Dave Moore (left) and biological technician Seth Kennedy (right) retrieving a hoop net from the Rio Grande River in New Mexico. Hoop nets are useful for collecting fish and turtles in flowing waters.

Fishery Biologist Cathy Karp leads a seine netting team to collect fish for a population study in the Yakima River, Washington

Left - Biologist Sue Camp of the Montana Area Office, Billings, Montana, with a vertical gill net mounted on the 23-ft Parker cabin cruiser on Bighorn Lake in Montana.

Biologist Dave Moore and Seth Kennedy retrieving a hoop net from the Rio Grande, New Mexico.

Right - A Fisheries and Wildlife Resources Group field crew collecting fish for a population survey using backpack electrofishing gear in the Yakima River, Washington.
A Fisheries and Wildlife Resources Group field crew backpack electrofishing in the Yakima River, Washington, to collect fish for a population survey.
Electrofishing from a boat in the Closed Basin Canal, Colorado.
Left - Electrofishing from a boat in the Closed Basin Canal, San Luis Valley, Colorado.
Surgically installing sonic tags in experimental fish.


Left
-
surgically implanting sonic tags in experimental fish for a tracking study at the Tracy Fish Collection Facility, California.
Below - Photonic dye markers (green) on the dorsal fins of juvenile Chinook salmon.

Photonic dye markers (green) on the dorsal fins of juvenile Chinook salmon.


Right -
Biological technician Chuck Hueth hard at work attaching an external tag to a striped bass. Below Left - Lotek radio frequency transmitters ready for implanting in tracking study test fish.

Radio frequency transmitters ready for implanting in test fish

 

Biological technician Chuck Hueth hard at work attaching an external tag to a striped bass.


Below Left -
Sonotronics hydrophone for picking up sonic tag emissions in test fish. Right - Sonotronics Sonic tag receiver with hydrophone.

Hydrophone for receiving sonic tag signals from implanted test fish.

Sonic tag receiver with hydrophone.

Diagram showing how the dual beam sonar hydroacoustic instrument works.
Left - Hydroacoustic technology is a cost effective way to quickly perform fish population surveys and determine bottom topography in large bodies of water. Left - Diagram showing how the dual beam hydroacoustic instrument works. Inset Upper Left - Biologist Juddson Sechrist moniitors the output from the hydroacoustics sensor while the boat follows a transect path using GPS. Inset Bottom Right - The active BioSonics hydroacoustic sensor and receiver unit, usually mounted at the stern of the survey boat.
Right - The BioSonics Visual Analyzer software screen output showing typical hydroacoustic data - the echogram used to estimate reservoir bottom topography and fish populations. The BioSonics Visual Analyzer software screen output showing typical hydroacoustic data.
Echogram data plotted as a density contour plot generated in Surfer.
Left - The echogram data can be used to generate a cross section of the reservoir showing the density of fish. The bottom of the reservoir is shown in green, while the water is mapped in yellows to reds. The darker red zones are where the fish are located. This graph was prepared using Surfer 8.0 graphics software.

 

Water Quality Sampling Gear

Below Left - An Infiltrix computer-controlled automated composite sampling system. This model is set up to pump one liter per hour through a disk filter manifold and a column containing XAD resin to bind herbicides and pesticides. Composite samplers are great tools for collecting time representative samples in systems that experience highly variable conditions, flows, or tides.
Below Right - A Hydrolab H-20 Datasonde multiprobe being cleaned and calibrated. These multiprobes are standard gear for lake and river water quality surveys, and can be remotely deployed to automatically record pH, temperature, DO, conductivity, redox, and turbidity data..

Automated water quality sampling instruments - a pump to collect composite samples for herbicides and pesticides, and a Hydrolab water quality multiprobe.

Doug Craft colecting a sediment sample from Ridgway Reservoir using a Ponar Dredge
Above - Research chemist Doug Craft colecting a sediment sample from Ridgway Reservoir, Colorado, using a Ponar Dredge.

Right - Biologist Juddson Sechrist using a vertical tow net to collect a plankton sample from Bighorn Lake, Montana, to help assess lake productivity. Below - Chemist Norbert Cannon, PN Regional Soil and Water Laboratory, Boise, Idaho, collecting water samples for chemical analyses using a Kemmerer bottle at Lake Owyhee, Oregon.

Chemist Norbert Cannon, PN Regional Soil and Water Laboratory, Boise, Idaho, collecting water samples for chemical analyses using a Kemmerer bottle at Lake Owyhee, Oregon.

Biologist Juddson Sechrist using a vertical tow net to collect a plankton sample from Bighorn Lake, Montana, to help assess primary productivity and plankton in the lake.

Teflon hand bailers for sampling wells in tight formations that cannot be pumped.


Left - Teflon hand bailers for collecting water samples from wells in tight formations that cannot be pumped. Below - Chuck Sullivan showcases a Grundfos submersible well pump while collecting seepage samples from piezomenter wells at Horsetooth Dam, Colorado.


Grundfos submersible well pump collecting seepage samples from piezometer wells at Horsetooth Dam, Colorado.

55-gal sediment water microcosm used for the Ridgway Reservoir simulation study.

Predicting reservoir chemistry by simulating the sediment-water interface using microcosms. Water and soil from a planned or existing reservoir are sealed in containers and allowed to develop anaerobic, chemically reducing conditions. Left - Research chemist Doug Craft (retired) monitors a 55-gal microcosm in a temperature controlled environmental chamber used to predict the chemistry of Ridgway Reservoir, Colorado. Below - Microcosms can be much smaller, such as these 750 mL vessels used to simulate the sediment-water interface for Jordanelle Reservoir, Utah.

Small sediment-water microcosm vessels used for the Jordanelle Reservoir simulation study.

Clean hands - dirty hands technique using clean room gloves to handle water samples with minimum contamination.

Ultra Clean sample collection at Lake Owyhee, Oregon. Left - Clean hands - dirty hands technique with clean room gloves to handle water samples. Below - The Go-Flo teflon at-depth sampler, a Kemmerer-type bottle for ultra-clean mercury sampling. These clean sampling techniques are essential to collect any water samples for analytes in the nanogram per liter (ng/L) concentration range. Mercury and many herbicides and pesticides are often found in the 10 -100 ng/L range.

The Go-Flo teflon at-depth sampler, a Kemmerer-type bottle for ultra-clean mercury sampling.


 

Aquaculture and Fish Holding Facility


Right -
A view of fish holding tanks at the Denver Aquaculture Facility.
Fish holding tanks at the Denver Aquaculture Facility.
The ultraviolet biofilter used to remove harmful bacteria and purify the Aquaculture Facility water.

Left - The ultraviolet biofilter used to purify the Aquaculture Facility water of bacterial contamination. Below - Looking down into one of the fish tanks showing the electronic tank heater (controller unit in the foreground) used to regulate water temperature.

Looking down into one of the fish tanks showing portable electronic tank heater used to regulate water temperature.

Automatic self-feeding devices over a large fish holding tank in the Denver Aquaculture Facility.
Left - Automatic self-feeding devices over a large fish holding tank in the Denver Aquaculture Facility. These units minimize food debris in the tank water and reduce feeding stress for fish in the tank.

 

Fishery Control Structures - Hydraulic Flume

A flume is an artificial channel that water can be pumped through to simulate flowing water condiitons. Right - Fish are being tested in the experimental hydraulic flume for avoidance reactions to stobe lights near a bypass structure. The behavior can be studied under light and dark photic conditions.
Fish are being tested in this experimental hydraulic flume for avoidance reactions to stobe lights near a bypass structure. The behavior can be studied under light and dark photic conditions.
This hydraulic flume is divided by a horizontal bar rack to test how fish of different sizes respond to barrier structure features such as louver width and louver angle to flow.
Left - The hydraulic flume is divided by a horizontal bar rack to test how fish of different sizes respond to barrier structure features such as louver width and louver angle to flow.

 

Video, Acoustic, and Microscope Camera Technology

The Applied Physics Laboratory DIDSON (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar) camera.

Left - The Applied Physics Laboratory (University of Washington) DIDSON (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar) camera. The lens of this special camera is made of a gel material able to focus and form images using reflected ultrasonic sound waves emitted by the device. DIDSON movie courtesy of Ed Belcher and info about the DIDSON camera available at Sound Metrics Corp. Below Right -DIDSON image of salmon swimming near the entrance to the saltwater drain at the Ballard Locks near Seattle, Washington - click to view the DIDSON movie (collected by Peter Johnson, Sr. Research Scientist at LGL Northwest).

DIDSON sonar image of salmon swimming out of the Ballard Locks near Seattle, Washington.

Right - The DIDSON camera mounted for lowering into the low visibility water of an irrigation canal. The cable goes to a signal processing device which is controlled by a laptop computer.
The DIDSON camera mounted for lowering into the low visibility water of an irrigation canal.
Steve Hiebert, retired Biologist and 86-69290 Group Manager (left) and Dr. Paul Marsh, Arizona State University (right) examine the DIDSON output on a laptiop computer.


Left -
Steve Hiebert, retired 86-68290 Group Manager (left) and Dr. Paul Marsh, Arizona State University (right) examine the DIDSON output on a laptiop computer. The DIDSON signal processing device is beneath the laptop. Below Right - DIDSON sonar image of underwater trash rack - click image to view DIDSON movie. DIDSON sonar image of underwater trash rack at the Tracy Fish Collection Facility, California.


Olympus SZH-10 stereo dissection microscope with a t-mount for a Nikon FG film camera.

Left - Olympus SZH-10 stereo dissection microscope with a t-mount for a Nikon FG film camera. Our Nikon D-70 digital SLR camera can be attached directly to the t-mount.
Below Right - Nikon D-70 digital camera with the Scopetronix universal eyepiece adapter. This adapter will fit any size microscope or spotting scope eyepiece, making it usable for wildlife observation as well as microscopy.
. Nikon D-70 digital camera with the Scopetronix universal eyepiece adapter.


Below Left -
Nikon polarizing microscope used for photographing rock thin sections and crystaline materials.
Right - A high-power Zeiss phase contrast microscope with a Zeiss M35 film camera attachment.

Nikon Polarizing microscope used for photographing rock thin sections and crystalline materials.

A Zeiss phase contrast microscope with a Zeiss M35 film camera attachment.

 

Computer Data Analysis Technology

Right - Vaki Riverwatcher automated fish counter with underwater video system. This unit was deployed on the Easton Dam Fish Ladder in Washington state.

Vaki Riverwatcher automated fish counter with underwater video system.

Computer output from the Riverwatcher system showing the outline of a bull trout, Salvelinus confluentus.

Left - Computer output from the Riverwatcher system software showing the outline of a bull trout, Salvelinus confluentus. The sophisticated pattern recognition software allows the system to be "trained" based on a simplified version of the generalized features of a given species of fish.


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This site updated November 3, 2014