WaterSMART News Releases http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom Reclamation Newsroom Channel http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=53148 Reclamation Releases Environmental Document on the Installation of SatLink2 on Flow Measurement Devices in the Truckee-Carson Irrigation District
CARSON CITY, Nev. - The Bureau of Reclamation has released for public review an Environmental Assessment for the installation of SatLink2 on Flow Measurement Devices in the Truckee-Carson Irrigation District (District). The District proposes to install 50 SatLink2 devices in the Carson Division that allow remote monitoring of irrigation water deliveries. The installation of SatLink2 devices at the water meters would reduce over-deliveries and ultimately the amount of water released from Lahontan Reservoir. <P> Reclamation proposes to provide WaterSMART Water and Energy Efficiency Grant funds to the District. Through the WaterSMART program, Reclamation provides cost-shared funding on a competitive basis for projects that seek to conserve and use water more efficiently, increase the use of renewable energy, protect endangered species, or facilitate water markets. For more on WaterSMART Water and Energy Efficiency Grants, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/weeg/index.html">http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/weeg/index.html</a>. <P> The EA was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and may be viewed at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/mp/nepa/nepa_projdetails.cfm?Project_ID=24896">http://www.usbr.gov/mp/nepa/nepa_projdetails.cfm?Project_ID=24896</a>. If you encounter problems accessing the document online, please call 916-978-5100 (TTY 800-877-8339) or email <a href="mailto:mppublicaffairs@usbr.gov">mppublicaffairs@usbr.gov</a>. <P> Written comments are due by close of business on Friday, April 1, 2016, to Doug Kleinsmith, Bureau of Reclamation, 2800 Cottage Way, Sacramento, CA 95825 or <a href="mailto:dkleinsmith@usbr.gov">dkleinsmith@usbr.gov</a><u>. </u> <P> <u> <br/> </u> <P> For additional information or to receive a copy of the EA, please contact Kleinsmith at 916-978-5034 (TTY 800-877-8339). The document may also be viewed at Reclamation’s Mid-Pacific Regional Office at the above address. <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=53087 Republican River Basin Study Informs Colorado, Kansas and Nebraska about Future Water Management
The Bureau of Reclamation has released the Republican River Basin Study, which identifies adaptation strategies that address water management challenges in the basin. This study, which includes a study area of 2.7 million acres of irrigated agriculture served primarily by groundwater supplies, represents an extensive collaborative effort among Colorado, Nebraska and Kansas. <P> "The Republican River Basin is a complex and important basin for these states," Reclamation Commissioner Estevan López said. "Because of its importance, new ground and surface water modeling tools were developed to evaluate future hydrology and operations within the basin. These tools will assist water managers as they make decisions to build resiliency against future climate change, while also maintaining compliance with the Republican River Compact." <P> The Republican River basin covers approximately 16 million acres and lies primarily within the Ogallala Aquifer. It originates in the high plains of eastern Colorado and flows east into Nebraska and Kansas. <P> The basin study found that climate change may impact future supplies and demands across the basin. Nebraska focused on augmenting the supply of Swanson Lake and creating new surface water storage on Thompson Creek, a tributary of the Republican River, while Kansas evaluated alternatives that increase the storage volume at Lovewell Reservoir. The modeling tools that were developed for the study evaluated alternatives to improve the supply reliability at the Frenchman-Cambridge Irrigation District in Nebraska, as well as the Bostwick-Irrigation District of Nebraska and Kansas. <P> Surface water supplies include a system of seven Reclamation reservoirs and one U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir. These projects provide flood control benefits, as well as supplies to six irrigation districts that serve approximately 140,000 acres. The Republican River is subject to an interstate compact between Colorado, Nebraska and Kansas that was ratified in 1943. <P> The Republican River Basin Study is a part of Reclamation’s WaterSMART Program. The report is available online at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/bsp">www.usbr.gov/watersmart/bsp</a>. <P> WaterSMART is the Department of the Interior's sustainable water initiative that uses the best available science to improve water conservation and help water resource managers identify strategies to narrow the gap between supply and demand. For more information on the WaterSMART program, visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART" target="_blank">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART</a>. <P> <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=53069 Bureau of Reclamation’s Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers Basin Study Predicts How Climate Change Will Impact the Sacramento and San Joaquin Delta
WASHINGTON - The Bureau of Reclamation has released the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers Basin Study, which found climate change will cause earlier runoff and refill reservoirs earlier in the year, potentially affecting reservoir operations and water storage. <P> This study, collaboratively developed by Reclamation, the State of California Department of Water Resources, El Dorado County Water Agency, Stockton East Water District, California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley and Madera County Resource Management Agency, examines climate change impacts and adaptation actions for the Sacramento River Basin, San Joaquin River Basin and the Tulare Lake Basin. <P> Water from the Tulare Lake Basin reaches the San Joaquin River Basin only in wetter years. Because of the connection with the Central Valley Project, the upper Trinity River Basin was also included in this study. The basins flow into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, which is the largest estuary on the west coast of the United States. <P> "These basins are at the center of discussions about the availability of water in California, not only for agriculture, but for municipal and environmental needs as well," Reclamation Commissioner Estevan López said. "Because of the collaborative efforts put forth in this basin study, we now have more information on how climate change will impact this region and a better understanding of what will be needed to ensure a sustainable water supply for today and for the future." <P> The study found that warming conditions will cause a median sea level rise of 36 inches, which will increase the difficulty of conveying water through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Also, temperatures will most likely increase by 1.6 degrees Fahrenheit in the early 21st century to almost 4.8 degrees Fahrenheit by late in the 21st century; precipitation may increase in the areas north of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, with very little change projected in the Tulare Lake Basin, where some of the greatest agricultural demands exist; evapotranspiration is expected to increase with warming temperatures; and snowpack will decline with warming temperatures, particularly in the lower elevations of the mountains surrounding California's Central Valley. <P> Reclamation, along with its partners and stakeholders, developed management actions to address these findings. The study revealed that conservation, groundwater and surface water augmentation projects and operational improvements may improve the reliability and sustainability of the Central Valley Project and State Water Project systems to meet current and future water needs. <P> The report also identified potential next steps to resolve current and future imbalances. These next steps were grouped into the following categories, Institutional Flexibility, Municipal and Industrial and Agricultural Water Use Efficiency, River Temperature Management, Forest Health, Groundwater and System Conveyance. <P> The Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers Basin Study is a part of WaterSMART, the Department of the Interior's sustainable water initiative that uses the best available science to improve water conservation and help water resource managers identify strategies to narrow the gap between supply and demand. The report is available at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/bsp" target="_blank">www.usbr.gov/watersmart/bsp</a>. For more information on the WaterSMART program, visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART" target="_blank">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART</a>. <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=53047 Reclamation Initiates 2016 WaterSMART Basin Study Selection Process
WASHINGTON - The Bureau of Reclamation is initiating the 2016 basin study selection process and requests letters of interest from eligible non-federal entities interested in participating in a new basin study. A short letter of interest is due to the respective regional office by April 4, 2016. <P> Through basin studies, Reclamation works with state and local partners to conduct comprehensive water supply and demand studies of river basins in the Western United States. Reclamation anticipates funding two studies in 2016. <P> Basin studies include four main elements: <ul> <li>Projections of water supply and demand, including the risks of climate change.</li> <li>Analysis of how existing water and power infrastructure will perform in response to changing water realities.</li> <li>Development of adaptation and mitigation strategies to improve operations and infrastructure in order to supply adequate water in the future.</li> <li>Trade-off analysis of the strategies identified and findings.</li> </ul> <P> Entities must contribute at least half of the total cost as cash or in-kind services. This is not a financial assistance program and Reclamation's share of the study costs will only be used to support work done by Reclamation or its contractors. <P> Reclamation’s regional office staff will review all letters of interest. Those selected for consideration will then work with Reclamation to develop a joint study proposal for evaluation and prioritization by a Reclamation review committee. <P> WaterSMART is the Department of the Interior's sustainable water initiative that uses the best available science to improve water conservation and help water resource managers identify strategies to narrow the gap between supply and demand. <P> To learn more about WaterSMART or this basin study selection process, please visit www.usbr.gov/watersmart/bsp/. <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=53008 Reclamation Releases Environmental Document on Tranquillity Irrigation District, East-West Intertie Water Conservation Project
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - The Bureau of Reclamation has released for public review an Environmental Assessment/Initial Study for the Tranquillity Irrigation District, East-West Intertie Water Conservation Project. The TID proposes to construct a pump structure and turnout at the Western Distribution System’s Towne Ditch, construct approximately one-half mile of pipeline to intertie with the Eastern Distribution System’s South Canal, install a flow meter and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition control system, and construct a solar panel system. <P> Reclamation proposes to provide WaterSMART Water and Energy Efficiency Grant funds to TID. Through the WaterSMART program, Reclamation provides cost-shared funding on a competitive basis for projects that seek to conserve and use water more efficiently, increase the use of renewable energy, protect endangered species, or facilitate water markets. For more on WaterSMART Water and Energy Efficiency Grants, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/weeg/index.html">http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/weeg/index.html</a>. <P> The EA/IS was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and California Environmental Quality Act, and may be viewed at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/mp/nepa/nepa_projdetails.cfm?Project_ID=24855">http://www.usbr.gov/mp/nepa/nepa_projdetails.cfm?Project_ID=24855</a>. If you encounter problems accessing the documents online, please call 916-978-5100 (TTY 800-877-8339) or email <a href="mailto:mppublicaffairs@usbr.gov">mppublicaffairs@usbr.gov</a>. <P> Written comments are due by close of business on Friday, April 1, 2016, to Doug Kleinsmith, Bureau of Reclamation, 2800 Cottage Way, MP-150, Sacramento, CA 95825 or <a href="mailto:dkleinsmith@usbr.gov">dkleinsmith@usbr.gov</a>. <P> For additional information or to receive a copy of the EA/IS, please contact Kleinsmith at 916-978-5034. The document may also be viewed at Reclamation’s Mid-Pacific Regional office at the above address. <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=52847 Reclamation Releases Final Environmental Documents for the Sweeney/McCune Creek Outflow Recovery and Automation Project
FOLSOM, Calif. – The Bureau of Reclamation has released the Final Environmental Assessment/Initial Study and Finding of No Significant Impact for the Sweeney/McCune Creek Outflow Recovery and Automation Project. <P> Through a WaterSMART Water and Energy Efficiency Grant, Reclamation will provide financial assistance to the Solano Irrigation District to recover surface water outflow for redistribution within the District. The project will improve water use efficiency by installing a long crested weir, integrated flume meters and automated discharge gates. The project is located in Solano County. <P> The Final EA/IS and FONSI were prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and are available at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/mp/nepa/nepa_projdetails.cfm?Project_ID=24030">http://www.usbr.gov/mp/nepa/nepa_projdetails.cfm?Project_ID=24030</a>. If you encounter problems accessing the documents, please call 916-978-5100 or email <a href="mailto:mppublicaffairs@usbr.gov">mppublicaffairs@usbr.gov</a>. <P> For additional information or to request a copy of the Final EA/IS and FONSI, please contact Carolyn Bragg at 916-989-7198 (TTY 800-877-8339). <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=52427 Reclamation Releases Truckee Basin Study, Providing Tools for Water Managers in California and Nevada to Help Meet Future Water Demands
WASHINGTON - The Bureau of Reclamation has released its study of the Truckee Basin in California and Nevada, projecting that climate change may impact water supplies in the 21st century. Now available online, this study provides water managers with information to better understand the basin’s water supply and demand from now until 2099, and also identifies potential options to help them meet future demands. <P> "The Truckee Basin is an important source of water for eastern California and western Nevada and includes the iconic Lake Tahoe," Reclamation Commissioner Estevan López said. "Reclamation and its partners now have the necessary information to develop options to ensure a sustainable water supply into the future." <P> Reclamation developed the study in partnership with the Truckee Meadows Water Authority, Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, Truckee River Flood Management Authority and Placer County Water Agency. <P> The Truckee Basin headwaters begin around Lake Tahoe. The basin includes the Truckee and Carson rivers and Pyramid Lake and encompasses the cities of Carson City, Reno and Sparks, as well as Reclamation's Newlands Project, all in Nevada. <P> According to the basin study, the Truckee Basin is heavily dependent on the Sierra Nevada’s snowpack and available supply is dependent on the availability to capture, store and manage water. Precipitation within the basin can vary greatly from the high elevations in the Sierra Nevada to the desert regions around Pyramid Lake. Year-to-year precipitation can also vary greatly, with several years of below- average precipitation being common. <P> The mean average annual temperature in the basin is anticipated to increase by up to five degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the twenty-first century, while annual precipitation within the basin may decrease slightly. The increase in temperature will change the timing and intensity of runoff, with more precipitation falling as rain instead of snow. Runoff will begin earlier, thus impacting the amount of water that can be stored in Truckee reservoirs because of current flood management requirements. <P> Also, limited storage within the basin will impact water supplies. For example, because of the earlier runoff, the ability to meet full storage after April will be reduced. Due to warming, basin reservoirs are also projected to have higher rates of evaporation, and will be less resilient during future droughts. Lake Tahoe’s surface is projected to drop below its natural rim more frequently, causing flows into the Truckee River at Tahoe Dam to cease; making Truckee supplies dependent on smaller reservoirs with limited capacity. <P> The study also found that the frequency and magnitude of flood events may increase within the basin. The likelihood of the basin experiencing more floods like the one in 1997 that heavily impacted downtown Reno and Sparks, as well as floods of lesser intensity, will increase 10 to 20 percent by 2050 and 30 to 50 percent by 2099. <P> Finally, the basin study identified structural and non-structural options to balance water supply benefits with flood risks, including working with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to allow flexibility in managing reservoir flood space, among other options. <P> The Truckee Basin Study is a part of WaterSMART. The report is available online at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/bsp">www.usbr.gov/watersmart/bsp</a>. <P> WaterSMART is the Department of the Interior's sustainable water initiative that uses the best available science to improve water conservation and help water resource managers identify strategies to narrow the gap between supply and demand. For more information on the WaterSMART program, visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART</a>. <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=51889 Reclamation Releases Draft Environmental Document for the Sweeney/McCune Creek Outflow Recovery and Automation Project
<p> FOLSOM, Calif. – The Bureau of Reclamation has released the Draft Environmental Assessment/Initial Study (EA/IS) for the Sweeney/McCune Creek Outflow Recovery and Automation Project. </p> <p> Through a WaterSMART Water and Energy Efficiency Grant, Reclamation will provide financial assistance to the Solano Irrigation District to recover surface water outflow for redistribution within the District. The project would improve water use efficiency by installing a long crested weir, integrated flume meters and automated discharge gates. The project is located in Solano County. </p> <p> Under the WaterSMART Grants Program, Reclamation provides cost-share funding on projects that promote benefits to water conservation and energy efficiency. </p> <p> The Draft EA/IS was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and is available at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/mp/nepa/nepa_projdetails.cfm?Project_ID=24030">http://www.usbr.gov/mp/nepa/nepa_projdetails.cfm?Project_ID=24030</a>. If you encounter problems accessing the document, please call 916-978-5100 or email <a href="mailto:mppublicaffairs@usbr.gov">mppublicaffairs@usbr.gov</a>. </p> <p> Comments are due by close of business Friday, Jan. 22, 2016. Please send comments to Carolyn Bragg, Bureau of Reclamation, 7794 Folsom Dam Road, Folsom, CA 95630. Comments may also be faxed to Bragg at 916-989-7208 or emailed to <a href="mailto:cbragg@usbr.gov">cbragg@usbr.gov</a>. </p> <p> For additional information or to request a copy of the document, please contact Bragg at 916-989-7198 (TTY 800-877-8339). The document may also be viewed at Reclamation’s Central California Area Office at the above address. </p> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=51709 Southeast California Regional Basin Study Evaluates Water Supply and Demand in Borrego, Coachella and Imperial Valleys
WASHINGTON - The Bureau of Reclamation today released the Southeast California Regional Basin Study, which evaluates options to resolve water supply and demand imbalances within the Borrego, Coachella and Imperial Valleys in southeastern California in the face of uncertainty due to climate change. The basin study is among the latest of a West-wide series of studies produced by Reclamation and non-federal partners and comes on the eve of a scheduled White House Roundtable on Water Innovation where Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell will join other senior Obama Administration officials and several private sector investors to discuss how to plan, effectively use and develop new clean water supplies to ensure our nation’s resilience to water supply shortages. <P> "Reclamation and its partner on the Southeast California Regional Basin Study are confronting the growing water supply and demand imbalances facing the region," Reclamation Commissioner Estevan López said. "Identifying the issues throughout this basin will help develop potential solutions to ensure the region has a sustainable water supply." <P> The study found that the Borrego subarea aquifer, which is recharged solely by groundwater, may be depleted in 50 years. Moreover, options to import and store water in the Borrego Valley groundwater basin are not economically viable at this time. <P> In the Imperial Valley, water users are dependent on imported Colorado River water. Historic climate data and modeling indicate dry conditions may become more frequent with longer durations. Climate change impacts may reduce the snowpack and precipitation leading to a reduced water supply, and can lead to more agricultural water demand as the growing season may become longer. Population is expected to double in the Imperial Valley within the next 40 years with water demand nearly doubling. <P> In the Coachella Valley, water users are dependent on a mix of groundwater and imported water from the Colorado River. The Coachella Valley Water District has addressed the overdraft of groundwater in its 2010 Coachella Valley Water Management Plan but is facing issues similar to those of the Imperial Valley related to Colorado River water supplies. Population is expected to almost triple by 2045, and though agricultural demand may decline by 45 percent, total demand is expected to increase. <P> The study evaluated structural and non-structural alternatives that addressed implementing a managed groundwater system in the Borrego Valley, adding pipeline infrastructure to connect Borrego Valley with either Coachella Valley or Imperial Valley, and using existing infrastructure to bank Colorado River water off-stream. <P> Reclamation partnered with the Borrego Water District to develop the Southeast California Regional Basin Study. The Coachella Valley Water District, Imperial Irrigation District, San Diego County Water Authority and other interested regional stakeholders also contributed to it. <P> The report is available at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/bsp">www.usbr.gov/watersmart/bsp</a>. <P> The Basin Study Program is part of the WaterSMART Program. WaterSMART is the Department of the Interior's sustainable water initiative that uses the best available science to improve water conservation and help water resource managers identify strategies to narrow the gap between supply and demand. To learn more about WaterSMART, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART</a>. <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=50769 WaterSMART Funding Opportunity Now Available for Title XVI Authorized Projects
The Bureau of Reclamation is seeking applications from congressionally authorized sponsors of Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse projects for cost-shared funding to plan, design or construct their projects. The funding opportunity is part of Reclamation's activity under the Department of the Interior's WaterSMART initiative, which focuses on improving water conservation, sustainability and helping water resource managers make sound decisions about water use. <P> This year, Reclamation anticipates providing funding for 5-10 projects. The funding opportunity is available at <a href="http://www.grants.gov" target="_blank">http://www.grants.gov</a> by searching funding opportunity number R16-FOA-DO-003. Proposals must be submitted as indicated in the application packet by 4 p.m., Mountain Standard Time, Dec. 10, 2015. It is anticipated that awards will be made this spring. <P> Reclamation provides funding through the Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Program for projects that reclaim and reuse municipal, industrial, domestic or agricultural wastewater and naturally impaired ground or surface waters. Reclaimed water can be used for a variety of purposes, such as environmental restoration, fish and wildlife, groundwater recharge, municipal, domestic, industrial, agricultural, power generation or recreation. Water reuse is a drought resistant water supply and is an essential tool for stretching limited water supplies in the Western United States. <P> Title XVI projects provide communities with a new source of clean water while promoting water and energy efficiency and environmental stewardship. Title XVI also is an important part of the Department of the Interior's implementation of the President’s June 2013 Climate Action Plan and the Nov. 1, 2013 Executive Order, Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change. <P> Since 1992, approximately $629 million in federal funding through the Title XVI program has been leveraged with non-Federal funding to implement more than $3 billion in water reuse improvements. The president's FY 2016 budget request included a $20 million request for the Title XVI program. <P> To learn more about WaterSMART and the Title XVI program, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART">http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART</a>. <P> <P> <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=50371 Basin Study Projects Shortfall in Future Water Supply for Santa Fe Basin in New Mexico
WASHINGTON - The Bureau of Reclamation today released a study of the Santa Fe Basin that found that the water supply for Santa Fe, absent implementation of new strategies, is not adequate to meet future demands even without the influence of climate change. <P> "Basin Studies provide important information on projected water supplies and demands so water managers can develop strategies to meet the water needs of their residents," Reclamation Commissioner Estevan López said. "Working collaboratively is the most effective way to manage water resources and the city and county of Santa Fe will benefit from the results of this study." <P> The Santa Fe Basin Study identifies shortages in the water supply and potential adaptation strategies to meet the water needs described in the basin’s 40-year water demand projections. The area’s population is expected to increase about 80 percent by 2055 and, unless action is taken, would be expected to result in a shortfall of about 5,155 acre-feet of water per year, the amount of water that provides for more than 20,000 people. When different climate change scenarios were incorporated into the study, water shortfalls of between 6,342 acre-feet to 9,323 acre-feet per year were projected. <P> Reliability of the San Juan-Chama Project was also studied under various climate change scenarios. The study found that projected flows within the project would decrease by 25 percent overall. Flows would decrease in the summer but would increase in the spring. Storage in Heron Reservoir is projected to be reduced and sufficient water for a full allocation to contractors will be available less frequently. <P> Developing strategies to adapt to expected changes in water supplies is another important component of the Santa Fe Basin Study and included input from the public, the city of Santa Fe and the county of Santa Fe. The portfolio of items selected to study further include the use of reclaimed water, water conservation, direct injection and infiltration for aquifer storage and recovery, and obtaining additional water rights. <P> Reclamation, the city of Santa Fe and the county of Santa Fe, which co-funded the study, developed the Santa Fe Basin Study. The basin includes the upper Rio Grande watershed, tributaries within the San Juan River watershed, a portion of water delivered to Santa Fe through Reclamation's San Juan-Chama Project, and groundwater aquifers of the Santa Fe area. The basin includes the city of Santa Fe, the main municipality in the watershed, and the northern portion of Santa Fe County. <P> The Basin Study Program is part of the WaterSMART Program. WaterSMART is the Department of the Interior's sustainable water initiative that uses the best available science to improve water conservation and help water resource managers identify strategies to narrow the gap between supply and demand. To learn more about WaterSMART, please visit <a href="www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART" target="_blank">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART</a>. <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=50027 Reclamation Selects 23 Projects Totaling $5.2 Million to Build Drought Resiliency in Nine States
WASHINGTON – Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Estevan López has announced the selection of 23 projects to receive grants totaling $5.2 million for proactive drought planning and other efforts to build long-term drought resiliency in nine states in the West. <P> "The western United States has faced an unprecedented drought this year and will face many more water challenges in the future," Commissioner López said. "This funding will help the selected communities prepare for future droughts." <P> Through a competitive process, Reclamation selected 12 drought resiliency projects and 11 drought contingency planning projects in the states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas and Washington. <P> Drought resiliency projects, also referred to as ‘mitigation actions,’ help communities prepare for and respond to drought. The 12 drought resiliency projects will receive a total of $3.4 million. <P> Of the $3.4 million set aside for drought resiliency projects, the Merced Irrigation District in California will receive $297,977 to develop a real-time simulation water management model that will help the district analyze, predict and respond to drought conditions. The district will also install two weather stations and two river gage stations to collect water supply data on precipitation, flows, temperature and system losses. <P> Drought contingency plans help communities recognize drought in its early stages, identify the effects of drought and conduct drought prevention activities. Reclamation also selected 11 drought contingency planning projects to receive a total of $1.8 million. <P> In California, $200,000 is going to the East Bay Municipal Utility District for the Bay Area Regional Reliability Drought Contingency Plan. The utility district will work with other regional water management agencies within the Bay Area to develop a drought contingency plan to improve water supply reliability during times of shortage. <P> For more than 100 years, Reclamation and its partners have worked to develop a sustainable water and power future for the West. This drought response program is part of the Department of the Interior’s WaterSMART Program, which focuses on improving water conservation and sustainability, while helping water resource managers make sound decisions about water use. <P> To find out more information about the WaterSMART program, visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart">www.usbr.gov/watersmart</a>. For more about the Reclamation’s Drought Response Program or selected projects, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/drought">www.usbr.gov/drought</a>. <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=49611 Bureau of Reclamation Provides $1.5 Million for River Basin Studies about How to Meet Future Water Demands
WASHINGTON - Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Estevan López announced today that Reclamation will use $1.5 million to partner with water managers in Arizona, California and New Mexico to conduct comprehensive water studies. This funding will help complete two basin studies and develop plans of study for two more. <P> "Reclamation and its partners are confronting widening imbalances between demand and supply in basins throughout the West," said López. "Working collaboratively with stakeholders within each respective basin, we can use the latest science and data to develop options that will achieve a sustainable water supply." <P> Reclamation selected the Salinas and Carmel River Basins in California and Lower Santa Cruz River Basin in Arizona as subjects for basin studies. A basin study is a comprehensive study that defines options for meeting future water demands in river basins in the western United States where imbalances in water supply and demand exist or are projected to exist in the future. <P> Reclamation will make $950,000 available for the Salinas and Carmel River Basins that will be matched with $1.16 million from the study partners. These California basins encompass 4,500 square miles with a population of 370,000 people and include the protected Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The two basins also include 250,000 acres of agricultural land and have a combined economic output estimated to be $11 billion annually. Through the basin study an integrated hydrologic model will be developed that identifies the risks and potential impacts of climate change on future water resources. It will then highlight options and adaptation strategies for helping to achieve a sustainable water supply. <P> In the Lower Santa Cruz River Basin, Reclamation will provide $392,750, which will be matched by the study partner, the Southern Arizona Water Users Association. The Lower Santa Cruz River Basin encompasses 3,869 square miles in southeast Arizona and has a population of approximately 980,000 people, most of whom reside in the Tucson metropolitan area. The region heavily relies on water from the Central Arizona Project and, due to the ongoing drought, is seeing declines in the groundwater supply. An annual deficit of 250,000 acre-feet is projected by 2025. The basin study will identify the water resources needed to mitigate climate change impacts and improve water reliability for municipal, agricultural and environmental demands. <P> Two basins were selected to develop a plan of study. A plan of study helps a cost-share partner - such as a local water district - define the outcomes and set the scope and focus for a potential future basin study. Reclamation will develop the plans of study with each cost-share partner. <P> The two plans of study are: <P> <ul> <li>Middle Rio Grande - federal funding: $84,000; non-federal funding $89,000</li> <li>Mojave River Basin - federal funding: $75,000; non-federal funding: $75,000</li> </ul> <P> Reclamation's share of the study costs may be used only to support work done by Reclamation or its contractors. The non-federal partners in a basin study must contribute at least 50 percent of the total study cost in non-federal funding or in-kind services. Non-federal partners typically include state and city agencies, municipal water districts and flood control and irrigation districts. Since 2009, total federal funding for the Basin Study Program is $17.5 million. <P> The Basin Study Program is part of the WaterSMART Program. WaterSMART is the U.S. Department of the Interior's sustainable water initiative that uses the best available science to improve water conservation and help water resource managers identify strategies to narrow the gap between supply and demand. To learn more about WaterSMART, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART</a>. <P> To learn more about the Basin Study Program or the projects announced today, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/bsp">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/bsp</a>. <P> <P> <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=49477 Basin Studies Provide Options for Communities to Meet Future Water Needs in the Western United States
WASHINGTON, D.C - The Bureau of Reclamation today announced the latest in a series of river basin studies that examine the growing imbalance between available supply, increasing needs and projected demand due to climate change in the western United States. <P> Studies have been completed in the Colorado River Basin, Lower Rio Grande, Milk-St. Mary Rivers, Santa Ana Watershed, Yakima River and the most recently completed Henrys Fork Basin in southeastern Idaho. <P> "Basin Studies are an important tool for Reclamation and its partners to have a clear understanding of the projected demands and supplies in local basins in the West," Reclamation Commissioner Estevan López said. "Through collaboration, proposed solutions are developed to close the gap between supply and demand, especially in the light of climate change." <P> The Henrys Fork of the Snake River, located in eastern Idaho, provides irrigation water for more than 280,000 acres, sustains a world-class trout fishery and is home for native Yellowstone cutthroat trout. <P> The purpose of this basin study is to assist state and local planning efforts by exploring options for meeting the complex water supply and management challenges in the basin, meeting the goals of the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer Comprehensive Aquifer Management Plan and Idaho State Water Plan, as well as identifying risks posed to water supply by climate change and opportunities to mitigate those risks. <P> Reclamation and the Idaho Water Resource Board prepared the Henrys Fork Basin Study while working with the Henrys Fork Watershed Council. The Henrys Fork Basin Study final report includes alternatives, which provide the Idaho Water Resource Board, and other interested stakeholders including conservation groups, irrigators, and other agencies options to meet the water demands in the future. <P> This basin study was conducted as part of WaterSMART. WaterSMART is the U.S. Department of the Interior?s sustainable water initiative that uses the best available science to improve water conservation and help water resource managers identify strategies to narrow the gap between supply and demand. <P> Basin studies are comprehensive water studies that define options for meeting future water demands in river basins in the western United States where imbalances in water supply and demand exist or are projected to exist. Through these studies, Reclamation collaborates with non-federal cost-share partners to help ensure sustainable water supplies in the West. <P> For more information see <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/bsp">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/bsp</a>. <P> <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=49329 Secretary Jewell Announces $50 Million to Help Conserve Water in Drought-Stricken West
<strong>LOS ANGELES, CA</strong> -- As part of the Obama Administration's continued effort to bring relief to western communities suffering from the historic drought, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today announced that Interior's Bureau of Reclamation will invest nearly $50 million to improve water efficiency and conservation in California and 11 other western states. <P> "In a time of exceptional drought, it is absolutely critical that states and the federal government leverage our funding resources so that we can make each drop count," said Secretary Jewell. "Being 'water smart' means working together to fund sustainable water initiatives that use the best available science to improve water conservation and help water resource managers identify strategies to narrow the gap between supply and demand." <P> Joined by Nancy Sutley, Chief Sustainability and Economic Development Officer of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the funding announcement was made today at the Donald C. Tillman Water Reclamation Plant in Van Nuys, CA, where millions of gallons of wastewater are purified each day. Secretary Jewell, Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Estevan López and Sutley emphasized the importance of federal-state partnerships to help work toward a more sustainable and resilient water future. <P> "Through the WaterSMART Program, Reclamation is providing funding for water conservation improvements and water reuse projects across the West," Reclamation Commissioner Estevan López said. "We commend the state of California for all the steps they have already taken to alleviate the impacts of the drought. We hope this federal funding for water reuse and efficiency will help us leverage scarce resources between the state and federal governments to bring much-needed relief for the people and environment of California." <P> "The federal government's support for critical water efficiency and reuse projects is most valuable especially during this historic drought in California," said Sutley. "The investments will help cities like Los Angeles carry out our sustainability objectives, further build our local water supply and reduce our reliance on imported water. We look forward to all these important opportunities ahead of us." <P> "We are honored to host Secretary Jewell at our Donald C. Tillman Water Reclamation Plant and Japanese Garden today," said LA Sanitation Director Enrique C. Zaldivar, P.E. "We look forward to learning more about the environmental partnership opportunities she will announce during her visit." <P> Reclamation is investing more than $24 million in grants for 50 water and energy efficiency projects in 12 western states, more than $23 million for seven water reclamation and reuse projects in California, and nearly $2 million for seven water reclamation and reuse feasibility studies in California and Texas. <P> WaterSMART is the U.S. Department of the Interior's sustainable water initiative. Since it was established in 2010, WaterSMART has provided about $250 million in competitively-awarded funding to non-federal partners, including tribes, water districts, municipalities and universities. These investments have conserved enough water to meet the needs of more than 3.8 million people. Every acre-foot of conserved water delivered means that an equivalent amount of existing supplies is available for other uses. <P> WaterSMART water and energy efficiency grants can be used for projects that conserve and use water more efficiently, increase the use of renewable energy, improve energy efficiency, benefit endangered and threatened species, facilitate water markets, carry out activities to address climate-related impacts on water or prevent any water-related crisis or conflict. The 50 projects announced today will be leveraged with at least 50 percent non-federal funding for a total of $133 million in improvements over the next two to three years. For a complete description of the 50 projects, please visit the <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/weeg/" target="_blank">WaterSMART Water and Energy Efficiency Grant website</a>. <P> Through Title XVI of the Reclamation Wastewater and Groundwater Study and Facilities Act, Reclamation provides funding for projects that reclaim and reuse municipal, industrial, domestic or agricultural wastewater and naturally impaired ground or surface waters. Title XVI provides up to 25 percent of project costs. Project sponsors provide the remaining 75 percent of the funding necessary to carry out projects, thereby leveraging limited federal funding to implement as many water reuse projects as possible. Seven projects in California will receive $23.2 million. For a complete description of these seven water reuse projects, please visit the <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/title" target="_blank">WaterSMART Title XVI website</a>. <P> Also under the Title XVI Act, Reclamation is providing $1.6 million for communities to study whether water reuse projects would help them to meet their future water needs. Four feasibility studies in California and three studies in Texas were selected this year. Feasibility studies are funded jointly by Reclamation and project sponsors. A cost-share of at least 50 percent of study is required. For a complete description of the seven new studies selected for funding, please visit the <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/title" target="_blank">WaterSMART Title XVI website</a>. <P> <P> <P>