WaterSMART News Releases http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom Reclamation Newsroom Channel http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=46485 Reclamation Seeks Applied Science Project Applicants for Desert and Southern Rockies Landscape Conservation Cooperatives
<img align="right" alt="DLCC FOA Applied Science Grants" height="259" hspace="2" src="http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/images/email/2014-04-11-dlccfoa.png" style=" border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; margin: 2px;" vspace="2" width="200" /><b>WASHINGTON</b> - The Bureau of Reclamation is seeking applicants for applied science projects for the Desert and Southern Rockies Landscape Conservation Cooperatives. Proposed projects are expected to deliver new capabilities that address priority resources identified and shared by Reclamation and partners involved in the Desert and Southern Rockies LCC. <P> The Desert LCC funding opportunity is seeking applicants to study wildfire impacts on riparian areas and study environmental flow impacts on the Colorado River Delta. This funding opportunity may be found at <a href="http://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> by searching funding opportunity number R14AS00031. Applications are due May 13, 2014 at 4 p.m. MDT. <P> The Southern Rockies LCC funding opportunity targets projecting future water availability and quality, projecting the resiliency and vulnerability of natural or cultural resources, and assessing and evaluating natural or cultural resources management practices and adaptation opportunities. The funding opportunity is available at <a href="http://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> by searching funding opportunity number R14AS00032. Applications are due May 13, 2014 at 4 p.m. MDT. <P> Approximately $700,000 will be available for Desert and Southern Rockies LCC projects combined. Up to $100,000 in federal funding will be available for each project award. Reclamation's share of each proposed project shall not exceed 50 percent of the total project cost. <P> The Desert LCC encompasses portions of five states: Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico and Texas, as well as a substantial portion of Northern Mexico. The area is topographically complex, including three different deserts (Mojave, Sonoran and Chihuahuan), grasslands and valley bottoms and the isolated mountain ranges in the southern portion of the LCC (Apache Highlands and the New Mexico-Texas Highlands, also known as the Sky Islands). There are several large river systems, including the lower Colorado, Gila, Rio Grande, San Pedro and Verde Rivers. <P> <img align="right" alt="Southern Rockies LCC FOA Report Header" height="259" hspace="2" src="http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/images/email/2014-04-11-srlccfoa.png" style=" border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; margin: 2px;" vspace="2" width="200" />The Southern Rockies LCC encompasses large portions of four states: Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah, as well as smaller parts of Idaho, Nevada and Wyoming. The area is geographically complex, including wide elevation and topographic variation, from 14,000 foot peaks to the Grand Canyon and cold desert basins. This topographically complex region includes the headwaters of the Colorado River and Rio Grande, the Wasatch and Uinta Mountains to the west and the Southern Rocky Mountains to the east, separated by the rugged tableland of the Colorado Plateau. <P> LCCs are partnerships of governmental (federal, state, tribal and local) and non-governmental entities. The primary goal of the LCCs is to bring together science and resource management to inform climate adaptation strategies to address climate change and other stressors within an ecological region, or "landscape." There are 22 different LCCs across the United States, territories and other countries. To learn more about Landscape Conservation Cooperatives, visit <a href="http://www.lccnetwork.org">www.lccnetwork.org</a>. <P> To learn more about these funding opportunities visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/LCC/">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/LCC/</a>. To learn more about the Desert LCC, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/dlcc">www.usbr.gov/dlcc</a>. To learn more about the Southern Rockies LCC, please visit <a href="http://southernrockieslcc.org">southernrockieslcc.org</a>. <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=46324 Bureau of Reclamation Releases Funding Opportunity Announcement of WaterSMART Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Feasibility Studies
<img align="right" alt="Title XVI FOA Cover Page" height="323" hspace="3" src="http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/images/email/2014-03-21-TitleXVIFOA.png" style="margin: 3px; border-width: 1px; border-style: solid;" vspace="3" width="250" /><b>WASHINGTON</b> - The Bureau of Reclamation has released a WaterSMART Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Feasibility Study Funding Opportunity Announcement for non-federal government entities, Indian tribes, water districts, wastewater districts or rural water districts in the 17 western states. <P> Funding is available for two funding groups. Entities may submit applications for funding in amounts up to $150,000 for feasibility studies that can be completed within 18 months or up to $450,000 for feasibility studies that can be completed within 36 months. Applicants must provide at least 50 percent non-federal cost-shared funding for the feasibility study. A total of about $1.5 million is expected to be available this year. <P> This announcement is available at <a href="http://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> by searching for funding opportunity number R14AS00030. Proposals must be submitted as indicated on <a href="http://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> by May 6, 2014, 4:00 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time. It is anticipated that awards will be announced this summer. <P> The Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Program focuses on identifying and investigating opportunities to reclaim and reuse wastewater and naturally impaired ground and surface water in the 17 Western States and Hawaii. It has the potential to provide communities with a new source of clean water while promoting water and energy efficiency and environmental stewardship. <P> Since its establishment in 2010, WaterSMART has provided more than $161 million in competitively-awarded funding to non-federal partners, including tribes, water districts, municipalities and universities through WaterSMART Grants and the Title XVI Program. <P> To learn more about WaterSMART, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART</a>. <P> <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=45944 Reclamation Issues Draft Henrys Fork Basin Study for Public Comment
BOISE, Idaho - The Bureau of Reclamation has issued the Draft Henrys Fork Basin Study for a 30-day public comment period. The Study includes 12 alternatives that describe strategies to improve water supply conditions in the Upper Snake River basin. <P> The alternatives represent a menu of adaptation strategies that are intended to have a positive impact on water management. They are broadly grouped to include categories such as water storage, water conservation, groundwater recharge, demand reduction, and water marketing strategies. <P> The comment period will end on March 6. The final Basin Study will be released on April 30. <P> "This represents several years of hard work and cooperation among so many groups with diverse interests," said Pacific Northwest Regional Director Lorri Lee. "Everyone who is concerned about the future of Idaho's water supply will recognize this work as a proactive accomplishment." <P> Reclamation joined the Idaho Water Resource Board in partnership to explore alternatives under the WaterSMART Basin Program. The process was done in collaboration with a stakeholder workgroup under the Henry's Fork Watershed Council, an organization made up of government agencies, irrigation districts, conservation organizations, universities, and the farming community. <P> The Henrys Fork watershed provides irrigation for over 280,000 acres and sustains a world-class trout fishery. <P> The Draft Henrys Fork Basin Study is available at: <a href="http://on.doi.gov/1aDyjW1">http://on.doi.gov/1aDyjW1 </a>. <P> The comment form and instructions can be downloaded at: <a href="http://on.doi.gov/NeTymW">http://on.doi.gov/NeTymW </a>. <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=45885 Federal Agencies Collaborate to Fund Projects for Improved Agricultural Water Use Efficiencies in Drought-Stricken Areas of California
<b>SACRAMENTO, Calif.</b> – The Bureau of Reclamation and the Natural Resources Conservation Service are collaborating in providing federal funds to California water districts, irrigation districts, tribes, and other organizations with water or power delivery authority located in California to improve the efficiency of agricultural water use throughout the state. <P> One of the worst droughts in decades prompted Governor Jerry Brown to issue an emergency drought proclamation on January 17. In order to provide flexibility for local and state water managers, the Obama Administration is committed to coordinated federal actions and investments. <P> "The situation in California is critical and requires a swift and effective response at all levels of government," Reclamation Commissioner Michael L. Connor said. "Reclamation and NRCS are part of a larger partnership of state, federal, tribal, local and other partners who are focusing all available resources and creativity to meet this ongoing challenge across the state. Reclamation and NRCS are working together to leverage federal funds for water delivery agencies and agricultural producers and will provide up to $14 million in funding for water districts and associated growers to conserve water and improve water management. We are working around the clock with the National Drought Resilience Partnership to identify a multitude of ways we can provide support to California today and in the future." <P> The National Drought Resilience Partnership provides coordination between seven federal agencies to help communities increase preparedness for drought and reduce the impact of drought events. It will also build on existing efforts to provide states, tribes and local communities with decision making tools for drought preparedness planning. <P> Reclamation/NRCS partnership projects funded in Fiscal Year 2014 will help communities build resilience to drought, including modernizing their water infrastructure and efficiently using scarce water resources, while supporting the agricultural economy. <P> Water conservation and efficiency improvement projects implemented since the Reclamation/NRCS partnership was established in 2011 have helped water purveyors and producers prepare for and respond to the current drought conditions. The $20.8 million invested through that program has already saved 38,000 acre-feet of water each year by purveyors and helped increase water efficiencies on-farm by an average of 25 percent. An early member of this partnership, the Southern San Joaquin Irrigation District, announced in 2013 that farmers served by the project increased their crop yields by 30 percent, using 30 percent less water. <P> Reclamation has made available a Funding Opportunity Announcement to invite tribes, irrigation districts, water districts and other organizations with water or power delivery authority located in California to leverage their money and resources by cost sharing with Reclamation on projects that conserve water, improve water management, and create new supplies for agricultural irrigation. Projects should also increase the capability or success rate of on-farm water conservation or water use efficiency projects that can be undertaken by farmers and ranchers through irrigation system improvements and irrigation efficiency enhancements. <P> As part of the Reclamation/NRCS partnership, NRCS – through 2014 Farm Bill programs – will provide funding and technical assistance to farmers and ranchers for the eligible on-farm conservation practices of selected projects under this FOA. On-farm water conservation practices could include irrigation improvements such as conversion to sprinkler or drip systems, micro-irrigation, and tail water recovery systems. Reclamation and NRCS will each provide up to $7 million for this effort. <P> Proposals must be submitted on line at <a href="http://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> using Funding Opportunity Number R14AS00021. The deadline for submission is Monday, Mar. 24, 2014, at 12 p.m. PDT. It is anticipated that awards will be made this spring. For additional information, please contact Gene Lee at 916-978-5219 (TTY 800-877-8339) or glee@usbr.gov. <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=45864 Pre-Proposals Sought for Desalination and Water Purification Research Grant Opportunity
<b>DENVER</b> - The Bureau of Reclamation is seeking new technologies to study through the Desalination and Water Purification and Development Program. Pre-proposal applications are being accepted for research and laboratory studies as well as pilot scale projects aimed at increasing usable water supplies in the United States. <P> Reclamation will provide funding up to $150,000 for the research and laboratory studies and $400,000 for the pilot scale projects. Individuals, institutions of higher education, commercial or industrial organizations, private entities (including state and local governments), and Indian Tribal governments are eligible to apply. Cost-sharing is encouraged but not required for institutions of higher education. Other applicants must provide cost-share of 75% of the cost of their project. <P> The DWPR Program is helping Reclamation and its partners confront widening imbalances between supply and demand in basins throughout the west through testing and development of new advanced water treatment technologies. <P> The DWPR Program focuses on three main goals: (1) augment the supply of usable water in the United States; (2) understand the environmental impacts of desalination and develop approaches to minimize these impacts relative to other water supply alternatives; (3) develop approaches to lower the financial costs of desalination so that it is an attractive option relative to other alternatives in locations where traditional sources of water are inadequate. <P> The funding opportunity announcement is available at www.grants.gov by searching for announcement number R14AS00014. Pre-proposals must be submitted through www.grants.gov by Feb. 27, 2014, at 4:00 p.m. <P> To learn more about Reclamation's Advanced Water Treatment activities, please visit: <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/awt/">www.usbr.gov/awt/</a>. <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=45804 Reclamation Releases Environmental Document for the Tracy Lake Groundwater Recharge Project
<p><strong>FOLSOM, Calif. –</strong> The Bureau of Reclamation has released an Environmental Assessment for the North San Joaquin Water Conservation District Tracy Lake Groundwater Recharge Project as part of the WaterSMART Grant Program.</p> <p>Reclamation proposes to provide funding for the Tracy Lake Groundwater Recharge Project. The proposed project consists of construction and operation associated with a new water diversion intake structure with a fish screen in the Mokelumne River. The project would include a new pump station and pipeline to convey the diverted water to Tracy Lake from the Mokelumne River.</p> <p>WaterSMART is the U.S. Department of the Interior’s sustainable water initiative that uses the best available science to improve water conservation and help water resource managers identify strategies to narrow the gap between supply and demand. Through WaterSMART grants, Reclamation provides 50/50 cost-share funding to irrigation and water districts, tribes, states and other entities with water or power delivery authority. You can learn more about WaterSMART at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart">http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart </a>. </p> <p>The EA was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and is available at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/mp/nepa/nepa_projdetails.cfm?Project_ID=16281">http://www.usbr.gov/mp/nepa/nepa_projdetails.cfm?Project_ID=16281</a>. If you encounter problems accessing the document, please call 916-978-5100 or email <a href="mailto:mppublicaffairs@usbr.gov">mppublicaffairs@usbr.gov</a>.</p> <p>Please send written comments to Patti Clinton, Bureau of Reclamation, 7794 Folsom Dam Road, Folsom, CA 95630-1799, by close of business, Friday, February 28, 2014. Comments may also be faxed to Clinton at 916-989-7208 or emailed to <a href="mailto:pclinton@usbr.gov">pclinton@usbr.gov</a>. For additional information or to request a copy of the Draft EA, please contact Clinton at 916-989-7173 (1-800-877-8339).</p> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=45486 Lower Rio Grande Basin Study Shows Shortfall in Future Water Supply
WASHINGTON - Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Michael L. Connor released the Lower Rio Grande Basin Study that evaluated the impacts of climate change on water demand and supply imbalances along the Rio Grande along the United States/Mexico border from Fort Quitman, Tex., to the Gulf of Mexico. <P> "Basin studies are an important element of the Department of the Interior’s WaterSMART initiative and give us a clearer picture of the possible future gaps between water demand and our available supplies," Commissioner Connor said. "This study of the lower Rio Grande basin will provide water managers with science-based tools to make important future decisions as they work to meet the region’s diverse water needs. In addition, the study will help inform water management discussions between the U.S. and Mexico through the International Boundary Water Commission." <P> Among the findings and conclusions of the Lower Rio Grande Basin Study: <P> <ul> <li>Climate change is likely to result in increased temperatures, decreased precipitation and increased evapotranspiration in the study area. As a result of climate change, a projected 86,438 acre-feet of water per year will need to be added to the 592,084 acre-feet per year of supply shortfall predicted in the existing regional planning process in 2060, for a total shortfall of 678,522.</li> <li>Water supply imbalances exacerbated by climate change will greatly reduce the reliability of deliveries to all users who are dependent on deliveries of Rio Grande water via irrigation deliveries.</li> <li>The Study includes an acknowledgment that all water management strategies recommended through the recently adopted regional water plan are part of a needed portfolio of solutions for the Study Area.</li> <li>Seawater desalination, brackish groundwater desalination, reuse and fresh groundwater development were examined as alternatives to meet future water demands. The study found that brackish groundwater development was most suitable. Further analysis was conducted; it was found that regional brackish groundwater systems would best meet the planning objective. An appraisal-level plan formulation and evaluation process was conducted to determine potential locations of each regional brackish groundwater desalination system.</li> </ul> <P> The Lower Rio Grande Basin Study was developed by Reclamation and the Rio Grande Regional Water Authority and its 53 member entities. It was conducted in collaboration with the Texas Region M Planning Group, Texas Water Development Board, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and International Boundary and Water Commission. It covered 122,400 square miles. The study cost $412,798 with the RGWRA paying for 52 percent of it. <P> The basin study was conducted as part of WaterSMART. WaterSMART is the U.S. Department of the Interior’s sustainable water initiative that uses the best available science to improve water conservation and help water resource managers identify strategies to narrow the gap between supply and demand. Basin studies are comprehensive water studies that define options for meeting future water demands in river basins in the western United States where imbalances in water supply and demand exist or are projected to exist. Since the program's establishment, 19 basins have been selected to be evaluated. For more information see <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/bsp">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/bsp</a>. <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=45444 Bureau of Reclamation and Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority Complete Santa Ana Watershed Basin Study
<b>WASHINGTON</b> - Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Michael L. Connor released the Santa Ana River Watershed Basin Study, which addresses water supply and demand projections for the next 50 years and identifies potential climate change impacts to Southern California's Santa Ana River Watershed. This study is a first of its kind for the predominately urban basin. It encompasses approximately 2,600 square miles in Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties and is home to more than 6 million residents. <P> "Basin studies are a key part of Secretary Sally Jewell's WaterSMART initiative and help us develop a clearer picture of the potential gap between water demand and available supplies," Commissioner Connor said. "This study of the Santa Ana watershed gives water managers an array of science-based tools to make key future decisions and help us identify potential ways we can meet the diverse water needs of the region's population." <P> The Santa Ana Watershed Basin Study, completed in partnership with the Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority, generated several tools to help SAWPA, its member agencies, and water sector stakeholders comply with California Assembly Bill 32 requirements to achieve 1990 greenhouse gas emission levels by 2020. A climate change analysis developed by Reclamation was also used by SAWPA to prepare an array of adaptation strategies to deal with the potential effects of climate change. <P> Ron Sullivan, SAWPA 'One Water One Watershed' Convener and Board Member of Eastern Municipal Water District, said, "Reclamation's tools and analysis link the best in climate change modeling with locally available data. With a clear picture of what the future may hold, we can move toward a more effective water management process to ensure a sustainable water future." <P> Authorized by the 2009 SECURE Water Act, the Basin Study analyzes future water supply and demand scenarios based on factors such as projected changes in climate, and varying levels of growth for municipal, agricultural and business interests in the Santa Ana River Watershed. Highlights of the two-year study include SAWPA and Reclamation hosting two well-attended climate change science workshops, development and analysis of basin adaptation strategies, creation of a Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Calculator for the water sector to help member agencies meet California's mandated GHG emission standards by 2020, development of a Groundwater Screening Tool, and creation of a series of 'frequently asked questions' that can assist basin water sector leaders in their decision-making. <P> The report found this watershed has challenges due to climate change and growing populations. The challenges in this watershed include increasing demand, earlier snowmelt and runoff, and faster than historical sea level rise threatening coastal communities, water infrastructure and groundwater basins. "This study contributed critical information for updating our 'One Water One Watershed' Plan," said SAWPA General Manager Celeste Cantu. "Reclamation's climate change analysis helped develop effective adaptation strategies for our watershed, and provides us a strong technical foundation to start that conversation as we move toward the future." <P> "This study is one of several basin studies being conducted in Southern California," said Reclamation's Lower Colorado Regional Director Terry Fulp. "This program fosters a collaborative approach to examine a basin's water supply and demand challenges as well as the impacts of climate change. It also provides water resource managers critical information to help them prepare, plan, and implement adaptation strategies to address future conditions." <P> The results of the study are posted on Reclamation's website at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/bsp/">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/bsp/</a>. Copies are also available on CD and can be requested by contacting Reclamation's Study Manager Jack Simes at 951-695-5310. <P> WaterSMART is the U.S. Department of the Interior's sustainable water initiative that uses the best available science to improve water conservation and help water resource managers identify strategies to narrow the gap between supply and demand. Basin studies are comprehensive water studies that define options for meeting future water demands in river basins in the western U.S. where imbalances in water supply and demand exist or are projected to exist. Since the program's establishment, 19 basins have been selected to be evaluated. For more information see <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/bsp/">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/bsp/</a>. <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=45424 Upper Rio Grande Impact Assessment Reveals Potential Growing Gap in Water Supply and Demand
<b>ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.</b> – Increasing temperatures and changes in the timing of snowmelt runoff could impact the amount of water available on the upper Rio Grande in the future. These are some of the results of the Upper Rio Grande Impact Assessment released by Department of the Interior Assistant Secretary for Water and Science Anne Castle. <P> "This report uses the most current information and state of the art scientific methodology to project a range of future supply scenarios in the upper Rio Grande basin," Castle said. "It is a great first step and a call to action for water managers and users in the basin and the partner federal agencies to move forward and develop adaptation to the challenges this study brings to light." <P> The study was conducted by the Bureau of Reclamation in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It includes a detailed evaluation of the climate, hydrology and water operations of the upper Rio Grande basin of Colorado and New Mexico. Also included is an evaluation of the potential impacts associated with climate change on streamflow, water demand and water operations in the basin. <P> Temperatures will increase four to six degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the 21st century, according to the climate modeling used in the study. Although the modeling projects that total annual average precipitation in the basin will not change considerably, we are likely to see a decreasing snowpack, an earlier and smaller spring snowmelt runoff and an increase in the frequency, intensity and duration of both droughts and floods. <P> The models used for the study consistently project an overall decrease in water availability in the basin. Rio Grande supplies are projected to decrease by an average of one-third from current supplies. The water supply from the San Juan-Chama Project, which is imported to the Rio Grande, is projected to decrease by an average of one-quarter. <P> All of these impacts would contribute to a larger gap between water supply and demand and lead to future water management challenges for the Bureau of Reclamation and other water managers within the upper Rio Grande basin. <P> The URGIA is the first impact assessment to be completed by Reclamation as part of the Westwide Climate Risk Assessments through the Department of the Interior's WaterSMART Program. Impact assessments are reconnaissance-level investigations of the potential hydrologic impacts of climate change in the major river basins of the Western United States. Through WaterSMART, Reclamation is also able to conduct a more in-depth basin study in conjunction with state and local partners that would develop options and strategies to address supply and demand imbalances. <P> The WaterSMART Program focuses on improving water conservation, sustainability and helping water resource managers make sound decisions about water use. It identifies strategies to ensure that this and future generations will have sufficient supplies of clean water for drinking, economic activities, recreation and ecosystem health. The program also identifies adaptive measures to address climate change and its impact on future water supply and demand. <P> To read the report or learn more about WaterSMART please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/">www.usbr.gov/watersmart/</a>. <P> <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=45244 WaterSMART Basin Study Applicants Sought for 2014
<b>WASHINGTON</b> - The Bureau of Reclamation is seeking applications from entities interested in participating in the Basin Studies program for 2014. Basin studies are conducted throughout the West as part of Reclamation’s role in the Department of the Interior’s WaterSMART initiative, which helps to provide water managers better information to make decisions about water use. Interested non-Federal entities wishing to participate in the selection process for the 2014 Basin Studies program should submit a short letter of interest to their respective Reclamation regional office by Dec. 20, 2013. <P> Through Basin Studies, Reclamation works with state and local partners to conduct comprehensive water supply and demand studies of river basins in the western United States. Reclamation anticipates funding two to three studies in 2013. <P> Basin Studies include four main elements: <P> <ul> <li>Projections of water supply and demand, including the risks of climate change.</li> <li>Analysis of how existing water and power infrastructure will perform in response to changing water realities.</li> <li>Development of adaptation and mitigation strategies to improve operations and infrastructure in order to supply adequate water in the future.</li> <li>Trade-off analysis of the strategies identified and findings and recommendations as appropriate.</li> </ul> <P> Entities must contribute at least 50 percent of the total costs as cash or in-kind services. This is not a financial assistance program, and Reclamation's share of the study costs will only be used to support work done by Reclamation or its contractors. <P> Reclamation’s regional office staff will review all letters of interest. Those selected for consideration will then work with Reclamation to develop a joint study proposal for evaluation and prioritization by a Reclamation review committee. <P> The WaterSMART Program focuses on improving water conservation, sustainability and helping water resource managers make sound decisions about water use. It identifies strategies to ensure that this and future generations will have sufficient supplies of clean water for drinking, economic activities, recreation and ecosystem health. The program also identifies adaptive measures to address climate change and its impact on future water demands. <P> To learn more about WaterSMART Basin Studies please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/bsp">www.usbr.gov/watersmart/bsp</a>. <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=45165 Funding Opportunity Available to Increase Water Conservation or Improve Water Supply Sustainability
WASHINGTON - The Bureau of Reclamation is making funding available through its WaterSMART program to support new Water and Energy Efficiency Grant projects. Proposals are being sought from states, Indian tribes, irrigation districts, water districts and other organizations with water or power delivery authority to partner with Reclamation on projects that increase water conservation or result in other improvements that address water supply sustainability in the West. <P> The funding opportunity announcement is available at <a href="http://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> using funding opportunity number R14AS00001. <P> Applications may be submitted to one of two funding groups: <P> <ul> <li>Funding Group I: Up to $300,000 will be available for smaller projects that may take up to two years to complete. It is expected that a majority of awards will be made in this funding group.</li> <li>Funding Group II: Up to $1,000,000 will be available for larger, phased projects that will take up to three years to complete. No more than $500,000 in federal funds will be provided within a given fiscal year to complete each phase. This will provide an opportunity for larger, multiple-year projects to receive some funding in the first year without having to compete for funding in the second and third years.</li> </ul> <P> Proposals must seek to conserve and use water more efficiently, increase the use of renewable energy, improve energy efficiency, benefit endangered and threatened species, facilitate water markets, carry out activities to address climate-related impacts on water or prevent any water-related crisis or conflict. To view examples of previous successful applications, including projects with a wide-range of eligible activities, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/weeg">www.usbr.gov/watersmart/weeg</a>. <P> In 2013, Reclamation awarded more than $20 million for 44 Water and Energy Efficiency Grants. These projects were estimated to save about 100,000 acre-feet of water per year -- enough water to serve a population of about 400,000 people. <P> The WaterSMART Program focuses on improving water conservation, sustainability and helping water resource managers make sound decisions about water use. It identifies strategies to ensure that this and future generations will have sufficient supplies of clean water for drinking, economic activities, recreation and ecosystem health. The program also identifies adaptive measures to address climate change and its impact on future water demands. <P> Proposals must be submitted as indicated on <a href="http://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> by 4 p.m., Mountain Standard Time, Jan. 23, 2014. It is anticipated that awards will be made this spring. <P> To learn more about WaterSMART please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART</a>. <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=45125 WaterSMART Funding Available for Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Projects
WASHINGTON - The Bureau of Reclamation is inviting sponsors of congressionally authorized Title XVI projects to request cost-shared funding for planning, design or construction through the Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Program funding opportunity posted today. The funding opportunity is part of Reclamation's activity under the Department of the Interior's WaterSMART initiative, which focuses on improving water conservation, sustainability and helping water resource managers make sound decisions about water use. <P> The funding opportunity is available on <a href="http://www.grants.gov">http://www.grants.gov</a> by searching funding opportunity number R14AS00002. <P> Through the Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Program, Reclamation provides funding for projects that reclaim and reuse municipal, industrial, domestic or agricultural wastewater and naturally impaired ground or surface waters. Reclaimed water can be used for a variety of purposes, such as environmental restoration, fish and wildlife, groundwater recharge, municipal, domestic, industrial, agricultural, power generation or recreation. Water reuse is an essential tool in stretching limited water supplies. <P> Title XVI projects provide communities with a new source of clean water while promoting water and energy efficiency and environmental stewardship. Title XVI also is an important part of the Department of the Interior’s implementation of the President’s June 2013 Climate Action Plan and the Nov. 1, 2013 Executive Order, Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change. <P> Since its establishment in 2010, WaterSMART has provided more than $161 million in competitively-awarded funding to non-federal partners, including tribes, water districts, municipalities and universities through WaterSMART Grants and the Title XVI Program. <P> Proposals must be submitted as indicated on <a href="http://www.grants.gov">http://www.grants.gov</a> by 4 p.m., Mountain Standard Time, Jan. 7, 2014. It is anticipated that awards will be made this spring. <P> To learn more about WaterSMART, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART">http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART</a>. <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=44627 Reclamation Collaborates with Colorado River Basin Tribes Partnership in Tribally-Focused Water Study
<b>ALBUQUERQUE</b> – U.S. Department of the Interior Assistant Secretary for Water and Science Anne Castle announced today a collaborative agreement for the Bureau of Reclamation to work with the Colorado River Basin Tribes Partnership (Ten Tribes Partnership) in a tribally-focused effort to address projected water supply and demand imbalances in the Colorado River Basin. <P> This effort, implementing commitments identified in the Colorado River Basin Water Supply and Demand Study published last December, will focus specifically on issues facing the tribal communities in the basin and their water resources. <P> "The Colorado River is the essential foundation for the physical, economic and cultural sustenance of the tribes in the Ten Tribes Partnership, and it is critical that we work together to address existing and future threats to the adequacy of supplies and the River itself," said Castle. "A hallmark of success and progress on difficult Colorado River issues has been collaborative efforts among various parties with vested interests in the River, and the agreement announced today is an excellent example." <P> "The Colorado River Basin Tribes Partnership is an important stakeholder in water use for multiple purposes including irrigation, recreation, wildlife and habitat restoration, municipal, industrial, mining, power generation, as well as cultural and religious activities," said T. Darryl Vigil, chairman of the Ten Tribes Partnership. <P> Castle announced the agreement today at a joint event with key representatives of the Ten Tribes Partnership in Albuquerque. Reclamation and the Ten Tribes Partnership will collaborate on the study on the role of tribal water rights that is expected to be completed by December 2015. Castle says Interior and the Partnership will allocate financial resources and technical expertise for the effort – including today's commitment by Reclamation to provide $100,000 to jump start the study effort. Reclamation Commissioner Michael L. Connor says ensuring meaningful tribal participation with financial assistance from the agency's Basin Study Program will only help to improve the effort. <P> "I am pleased that we have been able to build upon our work with the Ten Tribes Partnership to ensure tribal issues continue to be addressed in Colorado River Basin Study activities," Connor said. "Reclamation's commitment to meet the nation's obligations to Indian Country continues to be strong and unwavering." <P> The 2012 Colorado River Basin Water Supply and Demand Study, the most comprehensive study of future supplies and demands on the Colorado River ever developed, was produced collaboratively with a wide array of stakeholders including the Ten Tribes Partnership. The study's findings projected significant shortfalls between expected water supplies and demands in the Colorado River Basin in coming decades. The study is widely acknowledged as a call to action for all who rely on the Colorado River. Building upon recent successful efforts to improve water management in the Basin, recent efforts have focused on enhancing the resiliency and sustainability of the Basin's limited resources. <P> The Colorado River Basin Tribes Partnership began in 1992 and is made up of ten tribes: the Chemehuevi Indian Tribe, Cocopah Indian Community, Colorado River Indian Tribes, Fort Mojave Indian Tribe, Jicarilla Apache Nation, Navajo Nation, Quechan Indian Tribe, Southern Ute Indian Tribe, Ute Mountain Ute Indian Tribe and Ute Tribe of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation. For more information on the Partnership visit: <a href="http://www.crwua.org/colorado-river/ten-tribes">http://www.crwua.org/colorado-river/ten-tribes</a>. <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=44324 Reclamation Announces $1.4 Million for Applied Science Projects to Support Desert and Southern Rockies Landscape Conservation Cooperatives
<b>WASHINGTON</b> - Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Michael L. Connor announced 12 projects will receive a total of $1.4 million to develop applied science tools in support of the Desert and Southern Rockies Landscape Conservation Cooperatives. Through cost-share agreements, this funding will be used to support $3.13 million for the development of resource management tools to assist LCC stakeholders. <P> "Landscape Conservation Cooperatives are a network of public-private partnerships that improve management of the nation's natural resources to make them more resilient to projected impacts of climate change," said Commissioner Connor. "These projects provide specific tools that can be used by resource managers making on-the-ground management decisions that help ensure landscape sustainability." <P> Funding was made available through the Department of the Interior's WaterSMART Initiative. Six research projects were selected to receive funding within the Desert LCC: <ul> <li><b>Sky Island Alliance</b> will develop science and conservation-based guidance to assist natural resource managers in responding to expected climate change and other stressors on springs ecosystems in sky island regions of the Desert LCC. The project will result in publication of an Arizona Springs Restoration Handbook, which will aid managers in directing limited resources to preserve these key water resources and species that depend on them. ($127,407)</li> <li><b>Northern Arizona University</b> will build upon the U.S. Forest Service Four Forest Restoration Initiative in Northern Arizona to investigate how restoration efforts can affect the water volume available in the snowpack and soil moisture in the Desert LCC. This project will result in a tool that can be used to predict the water volume in snowpack and soil moisture response to various forest treatments. ($149,866)</li> <li><b>Southern Nevada Water Authority</b> will add new modeling and analytical capabilities to tools developed as part of a previous WaterSMART Climate Analysis Tools Grant that assessed impacts of climate change on water quality and sediment transport in Lake Mead. Project results are intended to increase an understanding of how water quality characteristics and nutrient levels in Lake Mead may be affected by climate change. ($149,961)</li> <li><b>Texas Tech University</b> will conduct quantitative and predictive analysis of the connectivity of isolated desert “wetlands” that include tinajas – the name for eroded pools in bedrock – for 20 wildlife species over the Sonoran desert ecoregion. Potential loss of wetlands due to climate change will also be studied to identify high value areas that can be prioritized for future restoration efforts and targeted for better management practices. ($85,424)</li> <li><b>Museum of Northern Arizona, Inc.</b> will leverage tools previously developed by the Springs Stewardship Initiative to help resource managers in the southwestern U.S. collect, analyze, report upon, monitor and archive the complex and interrelated information associated with springs and spring-dependent species in the region. The information will be compiled and made readily available online. The Museum will further develop interactive online maps and climate change risk assessment tools of springs-dependent sensitive plant and animal species. ($149,839)</li> <li><b>U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center</b> will work with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Geological Survey to develop new operational rules for water managers to guide reservoir releases to promote the establishment of native cottonwood and willow stands downstream of reservoirs while balancing other water management needs. Once completed, project benefits will be transferable to other managed river systems in the arid southwest. ($95,000)</li> </ul> <P> Six projects were selected to receive funding within the Southern Rockies LCC: <P> <ul> <li><b>University Corporation for Atmospheric Research</b> will improve data collection and modeling of snowpack conditions to increase the accuracy of seasonal streamflow forecasts that inform water management decisions in the Upper Rio Grande Basin. This project will leverage new measurement and modeling techniques that are now available which can improve both the initial estimates of hydrologic conditions in river basins prior to snowmelt as well as time-evolving conditions occurring during the melt season. ($81,982)</li> <li><b>The Nature Conservancy</b> will assess the importance of tributary junctions along the Colorado and Dolores Rivers for maintaining riparian and aquatic habitat as lower peak flows reduce areas of complex habitat on the mainstem reaches. This will build on the Colorado River Basin Study to better understand how flow management at major reservoirs relates to the health of riparian vegetation and fish species along the Colorado River. ($128,374)</li> <li><b>Conservation Biology Institute</b> will create a Southern Rockies LCC Conservation Planning Atlas, adding to the network of existing LCC Atlases at DataBasin.org. This web-based tool will facilitate conservation planning and inform management decisions related to riparian and wetland species and climate change. ($35,000)</li> <li><b>Utah State University</b> will leverage past research efforts by the Wasatch Range Metropolitan Area to produce a climate information resource for local water managers in support of planning for future climate variability. Most climate analysis to date has focused on projecting what conditions will look like in 20-50 years. This project will look ahead only 10-15 years. This information will help water managers better use climate change information to make current water management decisions. For example, local managers could use this information to answer questions such as how to operate a reservoir this year in order to save enough water to deal with drought conditions expected in the next few years. ($147,495)</li> <li><b>U.S Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station</b> will develop an interactive guide for future efforts to assess the vulnerability of riparian dependent species and habitats to climate change with specific emphasis on the Colorado and Rio Grande Basins. The interactive tool will assist resource managers identify previous vulnerability assessments, reduce duplication of efforts and improve future assessments. ($40,176)</li> <li><b>U.S. Department of Agriculture Valles Caldera National Preserve</b> will assess how forest restoration actions (thinning and prescribed burning) and climate change impact the hydrologic functions of watersheds, providing valuable information on forest ecology and watershed management. The project will focus on the Jemez Mountains in northern New Mexico. It will build upon research needs previously identified by the Nature Conservancy, to determine the extent of thinning needed, to quantify potential increases in water yield as a result of large scale restoration treatments, and to determine the costs of wildfires and any offsets from “new water” produced. ($92,160)</li> </ul> <P> You can learn more about these projects at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/lcc/">www.usbr.gov/watersmart/lcc/</a>. <P> Reclamation sought proposals through a funding opportunity announcement from non-federal entities. Funding for each project is limited to $150,000 and requesting entities must provide at least a 50-percent cost-share. Entities eligible to receive funding include: states, tribes, irrigation districts, water districts, universities, nonprofit research institutions, organizations with water or power delivery authority and nonprofit organizations. Reclamation also sought statements of interest from federal entities to develop a partnership of science projects in both LCCs. One project was selected from the statement of interest in the Desert LCC while two projects were selected through the statement of interest process in the Southern Rockies LCC. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service also provided $65,000 to support one project. <P> LCCs are partnerships of governmental (federal, state, tribal and local) and non-governmental entities. The primary goal of the LCCs is to bring together science and resource management to inform adaptation strategies to address climate change and other stressors within an ecological region defined as a landscape. There are 22 different LCCs across the United States, territories and other countries. <P> The Desert LCC encompasses portions of five states: Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico and Texas, as well as a substantial portion of Northern Mexico. The area is topographically complex, including three different deserts (Mojave, Sonoran and Chihuahuan), grasslands and valley bottoms, and the isolated mountain ranges in the southern portion of the LCC (Apache Highlands and the New Mexico-Texas Highlands, also known as the Sky Islands). There are several large river systems, including the lower Colorado, Gila, Rio Grande, San Pedro and Verde. To learn more about the Desert LCC, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/dlcc">www.usbr.gov/dlcc</a>. <P> The Southern Rockies LCC encompasses large portions of four states: Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah, as well as smaller parts of Idaho, Nevada and Wyoming. The area is geographically complex, including wide elevation and topographic variation; from 14,000 foot peaks to the Grand Canyon and cold desert basins. This topographically complex region includes the headwaters of the Colorado River and Rio Grande, the Wasatch and Uinta Mountains to the west, and the Southern Rocky Mountains to the east, separated by the rugged tableland of the Colorado Plateau. To learn more about the Southern Rockies LCC, please visit <a href="http://www.southernrockieslcc.org">www.southernrockieslcc.org</a>. <P> Interior established its WaterSMART (Sustain and Manage America's Resources for Tomorrow) Initiative in February 2010 to facilitate the work of Interior's bureaus in pursuing a sustainable water supply for the nation. Funding for WaterSMART is focused on improving water conservation and helping water and resource managers make wise decisions about water use. <P> To learn more about WaterSMART, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART</a>. <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=44304 Reclamation Selects Five Entities to Receive $485,423 to Establish or Expand Existing Watershed Groups
<b>WASHINGTON</b> - Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Michael L. Connor announced today that five entities in Colorado, Idaho and Oregon will receive a total of $485,423 to establish or expand watershed groups. The selected entities will use the funding to address water quality, ecosystem and endangered species issues. <P> "Collaboration is the key if we are going to meet the many water challenges we face across West," said Commissioner Connor. "Reclamation's Cooperative Watershed Management Program focuses on bringing diverse groups together within basins. These strong partnerships will ultimately help reduce and resolve future conflict." <P> The funding is made available through the Cooperative Watershed Management Program, part of the U.S. Department of Interior’s WaterSMART Initiative. This grant program supports the formation and development of locally led watershed groups and facilitates the development of multi-stakeholder watershed projects. The five entities selected for funding are: <P> <ul> <li><b>Land Trust of the Treasure Valley in Idaho ($100,000)</b> - The Land Trust of the Treasure Valley will establish the Boise River Enhancement Network in collaboration with Trout Unlimited, Ecosystem Sciences Foundation, Idaho Rivers United and the South Boise Water Company. The Network will address water quality issues, endangered species and loss of natural habitats in the lower Boise River watershed and will work with stakeholders to increase opportunities for public and private enhancement project collaboration.</li> <li><b>Western Slope Conservation Center in Colorado ($100,000)</b> - The Western Slope Conservation Center in Paonia is an established watershed group that will use funding to address issues in two adjacent drainages above and below the North Fork of the Gunnison River to improve stream stability, riparian habitat and ecosystem function in the watershed. The watershed has been experiencing water quality issues with E.coli exceeding state water standards, selenium in the North Fork of the Gunnison River and excessive amounts of salt flowing from the river into the Colorado River.</li> <li><b>Friends of the Teton River, Inc. in Idaho ($89,379)</b> - Friends of the Teton River located in Teton County will expand a current watershed group to form the Teton Advisory Council to develop a restoration plan that identifies, prioritizes and endorses a specific series of watershed restoration and water conservation activities to improve water quality and ecological resiliency of the Teton River watershed.</li> <li><b>San Juan Resource Conservation and Development in Colorado ($96,415)</b> - The San Juan Resource Conservation and Development in Durango will expand the membership of the Animas Watershed Partnership. The partners will address concerns with the temperature, sedimentation and E. coli levels in the Animas River as well as issues related to the endangered Southwest Willow Flycatcher.</li> <li><b>Hood River Soil and Water Conservation District in Oregon</b> ($99,629) - The Hood River Soil and Water Conservation District will use the funding to expand the Hood River Watershed group. The watershed group will address water supply and instream flows for threatened native fish such as the winter steelhead, Chinook salmon and coho salmon and other concerns in the watershed. The watershed group will address these issues by conducting analyses to identify and prioritize actions that partners can undertake to develop long term solutions within the basin.</li> </ul> <P> A complete description of all projects is available at: <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/cwmp/">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/cwmp/</a>. <P> Each entity will receive half of its funding this year and if sufficient progress is made as identified in its application, it will receive the remainder of its funding next year. No cost-share was required. <P> Reclamation awarded $333,500 to eight entities in 2012 in the first year of grant funding for the Cooperative Management Program of the WaterSMART initiative. Since its establishment in 2010, WaterSMART has provided more than $161 million in competitively-awarded funding to non-federal partners, including tribes, water districts, municipalities, and universities through WaterSMART Grants and the Title XVI Program. Funding for WaterSMART is focused on improving water conservation and helping water and resource managers make wise decisions about water use. <P> <P>