WaterSMART News Releases http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom Reclamation Newsroom Channel http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=48266 Reclamation Announces Water Conservation Field Services Program Grant Funding Available
BOISE, Idaho - The Bureau of Reclamation has announced that a Funding Opportunity Announcement for the Pacific Northwest Region's Water Conservation Field Services Program is now available. The grant opportunity is for cost-share funding for water conservation activities. <P> The funding opportunity announcement is available at <a href="http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/home.html">www.grants.gov</a> using funding announcement number R15AS00001. <P> Reclamation established the Water Conservation Field Services Program in 1996 to encourage water conservation on Reclamation Projects, assist irrigation districts to develop and implement water conservation plans, and foster improved water management. <P> WCFSP grants will require a 50 percent or better cost-share, and will be evaluated based on criteria outlined in the announcement. Eligible activities include water management planning, such as development or updating a water conservation plan, or implementation of activities identified in a water conservation plan. Implementable activities include: water measurement, automation, and improved conveyance efficiency projects, such as canal piping and lining. <P> To be eligible, there must be a defined relationship to a Reclamation Project located within the boundaries of the Pacific Northwest Region. Reclamation expects to award about 12 grants of up to $25,000, depending on Reclamation's final fiscal year 2015 appropriations from Congress. <P> Proposals must be submitted as indicated on <a href="http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/home.html">www.grants.gov</a> by 4 p.m., Mountain Standard Time, February 15, 2015. It is anticipated that awards will be made this spring. <P> <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=48092 Commitment to Address Climate Change Issues Highlighted in Reclamation Climate Adaptation Strategy
<b>Washington, D.C.</b> - Bureau of Reclamation's Principal Deputy Commissioner Estevan López has released the Climate Change Adaptation Strategy for Reclamation. In line with President Obama's Climate Action Plan, the strategy provides a framework in which Reclamation managers can develop and adopt innovative solutions that provide a more reliable water supply in a changing climate. <P> "This strategy represents our determination to directly face the challenges posed by climate change and to support our stakeholders and partners in addressing the related impacts to water supplies and power generation," López said. "Reclamation's work provides reliable and affordable water and power to agriculture, cities and the environment. With our stakeholders, we contribute some $64 billion and 403,241 jobs to the nation?s economy, so addressing these emerging challenges is vital." <P> The strategy identifies four primary goals to improve Reclamation's ability to consider climate change information in its decision making: <P> <ul> <li>Goal 1 - Increase Water Management Flexibility</li> <li>Goal 2 - Enhance Climate Adaptation Planning</li> <li>Goal 3 - Improve Infrastructure Resiliency</li> <li>Goal 4 - Expand Information Sharing</li> </ul> <P> Building on existing actions, the strategy identifies new activities to extend climate change adaptation efforts across Reclamation's mission responsibilities, including immediate and longer-term actions addressing each of the four goals. For each goal, a priority action is also identified to emphasize activities which will provide critical support for the goal. "Climate change adaptations must be developed collaboratively," López added. "Reclamation will engage water users, states, municipalities, tribes and non-governmental organizations to develop sustainable water supply solutions." <P> The report is available online at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/climate">http://www.usbr.gov/climate</a>. <P> <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=48072 WaterSMART Grants Available from Reclamation to Conserve Water and Improve Energy Efficiency
<b>Washington, D.C.</b> - Reclamation is inviting States, Tribes, irrigation districts, water districts and other organizations with water or power delivery to apply for a funding opportunity to cost-share on projects that conserve and use water more efficiently, increase the use of renewable energy and improve energy efficiency. The projects should support water sustainability in the west. <P> The funding opportunity announcement is available at <a href="http://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> using funding opportunity number R15AS00002. <P> Applications may be submitted to one of two funding groups: <P> <ul> <li>Funding Group I: Up to $300,000 will be available for smaller projects that may take up to two years to complete.</li> <li>Funding Group II: Up to $1,000,000 will be available for larger, phased projects that will take up to three years to complete. No more than $500,000 in federal funds will be provided within a given fiscal year to complete each phase. This will provide an opportunity for larger, multiple-year projects to receive some funding in the first year without having to compete for funding in the second and third years.</li> </ul> <P> Proposals must seek to conserve and use water more efficiently, increase the use of renewable energy, improve energy efficiency, benefit endangered and threatened species, facilitate water markets, carry out activities to address climate-related impacts on water or prevent any water-related crisis or conflict. To view examples of previous successful applications, including projects with a wide-range of eligible activities, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/weeg">www.usbr.gov/watersmart/weeg</a>. <P> Reclamation awarded $17.8 million for 36 Water and Energy Efficiency Grants in 2014. These projects were estimated to save about 67,000 acre-feet of water per year — enough water to serve a population of more than 250,000 people. The President's FY 2015 budget request included a $19 million request for WaterSMART grants. <P> Since 2009, about $134 million in Federal funding for WaterSMART Water and Energy Efficiency Grants has been leveraged with approximately $290 million in non-Federal cost share to implement more than $420 million in water management improvements across the West. <P> The WaterSMART Program focuses on improving water conservation, sustainability and helping water resource managers make sound decisions about water use. It identifies strategies to ensure that this and future generations will have sufficient supplies of clean water for drinking, economic activities, recreation and ecosystem health. The program also identifies adaptive measures to address climate change and its impact on future water demands. <P> Proposals must be submitted as indicated on <a href="http://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> by 4 p.m., Mountain Standard Time, Jan. 14, 2015. It is anticipated that awards will be made this spring. <P> To learn more about WaterSMART please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART</a>. <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=48071 Authorized Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Projects WaterSMART Funding Opportunity Now Available
<b>Washington, D.C.</b> - The Bureau of Reclamation is seeking applications from congressionally authorized sponsors of Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse projects for cost-shared funding to plan, design or construct their projects. The funding opportunity is part of Reclamation's activity under the Department of the Interior's WaterSMART initiative, which focuses on improving water conservation, sustainability and helping water resource managers make sound decisions about water use. <P> The funding opportunity is available on <a href="http://www.grants.gov">http://www.grants.gov</a> by searching funding opportunity number R15AS00009. <P> Reclamation provides funding through the Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Program for projects that reclaim and reuse municipal, industrial, domestic or agricultural wastewater and naturally impaired ground or surface waters. Reclaimed water can be used for a variety of purposes, such as environmental restoration, fish and wildlife, groundwater recharge, municipal, domestic, industrial, agricultural, power generation or recreation. Water reuse is an essential tool in stretching limited water supplies. <P> Title XVI projects provide communities with a new source of clean water while promoting water and energy efficiency and environmental stewardship. Title XVI also is an important part of the Department of the Interior's implementation of the President’s June 2013 Climate Action Plan and the Nov. 1, 2013 Executive Order, Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change. <P> Since 1992, approximately $600 million in Federal funding through the Title XVI Program has been leveraged with non-Federal funding to implement more than $3 billion in water reuse improvements. This year, Reclamation anticipates providing funding for 5-10 projects. The President's FY 2015 budget request included a $21.5 million request for the Title XVI Program. <P> Proposals must be submitted as indicated on <a href="http://www.grants.gov">http://www.grants.gov</a> by 4 p.m., Mountain Standard Time, Dec. 15, 2014. It is anticipated that awards will be made this spring. <P> To learn more about WaterSMART, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART">http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART</a>. <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=47932 New Report Predicts Climate Change Will Significantly Impact California’s Central Valley
<b>WASHINGTON, D.C.</b> – A new report released today by the Department of the Interior's Deputy Secretary Michael L. Connor finds that projected changes in temperature and precipitation, combined with a growing population, will have significant impacts on water supplies, water quality, fish and wildlife habitats, ecosystems, hydropower, recreation and flood control, in California's Central Valley this century. <P> "These projections by Interior’s Bureau of Reclamation show the importance of <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/image/president27sclimateactionplan.pdf">President Obama’s Climate Action Plan</a> to address challenges like those California's Central Valley will face to provide a sustainable water supply for its citizens and economy," Connor stated. "As President Obama will emphasize once again at the UN Summit this week, climate change is not a problem we can leave to future generations to solve. The challenges to our water supplies illustrated in this study provide graphic examples of how acting now is an economic imperative as well as an environmental necessity." <P> The <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/wcra/docs/ssjbia/ssjbia.pdf">Sacramento and San Joaquin Basins Climate Impact Assessment</a> projects temperatures may increase as the distance grows from the Pacific Ocean. Although most of the Central Valley may warm by 1°C in the early 21st century, a 2°C increase is projected by mid-century. Precipitation patterns indicate that there is a clear north to south decreasing precipitation trend compared to historical trends. In the northern parts of the Sacramento Valley there may be an overall increase to average annual precipitation. <P> "This assessment is one of several that studies climate risks to water supplies and related resources in river basins in the western United Sates," said Deputy Secretary Connor. “Although it is quite sobering to see the projections, we will follow up these assessments by continuing our work with the State of California and interested stakeholders to implement climate adaptation strategies in the Bay-Delta and other regions of the State. I am confident this ongoing collaboration along with the Climate Action Plan and the state’s water action plan will help ensure that California has the necessary water supply to meet its future needs.” <P> The study released today presents an overview of the current climate and hydrology over the entire Central Valley including the Sacramento, San Joaquin and Tulare Lake basins. It also evaluates how projected climatic and hydrologic changes could impact water availability, management and demands while analyzing impacts of future urban growth and changes in land-use within the Central Valley. <P> Some findings of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Impact Assessment that show a potential for significant implications for water management, human infrastructure and ecosystems include the following: <P> <ul> <li>Due to the warming conditions, the runoff will increase in winter and decrease in spring as more precipitation falls as rain instead of snow. Reservoirs may fill earlier and excess runoff would have to be released earlier to ensure proper flood protection is maintained. This may lead to reduced storage in reservoirs when the summer irrigation season begins.</li> <li>Water demands are projected to increase. Urban water use is expected to increase due to population increases in the Central Valley while agricultural uses are projected to decrease because of a decline in irrigated acreage and to a lesser extent the effects of increasing carbon dioxide.</li> <li>Water quality may decline by the end of the century. Sea levels are predicted to rise up to 1.6 meters in that time frame which will lead to an increase in salinity in the Delta and a decline of habitat for fish and wildlife. River water temperatures may increase because cold water availability from reservoir storage would be reduced.</li> <li>The food web in the Delta is projected to decline. Projected lower flows through the Delta and reduced cold water due to lower reservoir levels will make less water available for species, including endangered species such as migrating salmon.</li> <li>Hydropower generation is projected to decline in Central Valley Project facilities due to decreased reservoir storage. However, net power usage is also expected to decline due to reductions in pumping water and conveyance.</li> </ul> <P> The climate projections utilized the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 3, CMIP3, climate projections with demographic and land use estimates based on the California Department of Water Resources Water Plan 2009. <P> This study supports the broader Sacramento and San Joaquin Basins Study, part of the Department of the Interior's WaterSMART Program. The basin study, which is expected to be completed in 2015, will provide additional analysis including the evaluation of adaptation strategies to mitigate impacts of climate change and meet future water demands. It will also update the climate projections using the recently-released Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5, CMIP5, climate projections and land use - demographic projections based on the recent California State Water Plan 2013 update, which were not available when the analysis was completed for this impact assessment. <P> "This study confirms that the current status quo for water supply in California is not sustainable," Deputy Secretary Connor said. "Reclamation and its partners in California are already developing solutions to meet the projected imbalances between future supply and demand within the Central Valley." <P> "The Sacramento and San Joaquin Basins Study will provide a roadmap forward for Reclamation and the State of California to ensure a sustainable water supply well into the future," Acting Reclamation Commissioner Lowell Pimley said. <P> The WaterSMART Program focuses on improving water conservation, sustainability and helping water resource managers make sound decisions about water use. It identifies strategies to ensure that this and future generations will have sufficient supplies of clean water for drinking, economic activities, recreation and ecosystem health. The program also identifies adaptive measures to address climate change and its impact on future water supply and demand. <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=47769 Six Organizations to Establish or Expand Watershed Activities Using Key Funding Assistance from Reclamation
<b>WASHINGTON</b> - Bureau of Reclamation Acting Commissioner Lowell Pimley announced that $496,337 in WaterSMART Cooperative Watershed Management Program funding will be made available for six groups to establish or expand a watershed group. Those groups are located in California, Colorado, Montana and New Mexico. <P> "Reclamation is working to reduce conflict in the effective management of the West's water and power resources," Acting Commissioner Pimley said. "Collaborating with locally-led watershed groups is the pathway to improved water quality and ecosystem resilience in these watersheds." <P> The Sierra Streams Institute received $99,925 to establish a watershed group for the Bear River in north-central California. They are located in Nevada City, California. <P> Five entities were selected to receive funding to expand a watershed group. Those entities are: <P> <ul> <li>The Flathead Basin Commission in western Montana will receive $95,000 to expand its existing watershed group through the formation of a Flathead Basin Advisory Council.</li> <li>The Clark Fork Coalition near Missoula, Montana, will receive $100,000 for expansion of its staffing and capacity to address water resource challenges in the Upper Clark Fork watershed.</li> <li>Rio Grande Restoration, Inc. will receive $50,000 to expand the existing advisory council to include the Rio Chama watershed in northern New Mexico.</li> <li>The Blackfoot Challenge will receive $52,488 to expand its activities, including the establishment of watershed conservation plans and the improvement of natural resource management within the Blackfoot watershed in western Montana.</li> <li>Middle Colorado Watershed Council in Western Colorado will receive $98,924 to expand the existing watershed group by adding a coordinator-scientist to oversee outreach, develop restoration plans and address water quality/quantity issues.</li> </ul> <P> Distributed over a two-year period, entities will receive no more than $50,000 of the award in the first year. After a 270 day review to ensure the entity is making significant progress in its agreement – and if appropriations are available – it will receive the remaining funding. <P> The WaterSMART Cooperative Watershed Management Program provides funding for watershed groups to encourage diverse stakeholders to form local groups to address their water management needs. Learn more about the program and read complete descriptions on how the selected groups will use the funding online at: <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/cwmp">www.usbr.gov/watersmart/cwmp</a>. <P> WaterSMART is the U.S. Department of the Interior's sustainable water initiative that uses the best available science to improve water conservation and help water resource managers identify strategies to narrow the gap between supply and demand. Since its establishment in 2010, WaterSMART has provided about $200 million in competitively awarded funding to non-federal partners, including tribes, water districts, municipalities and universities through WaterSMART Grants and the Title XVI Program. Learn more at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART">http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART</a>. <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=47709 Nine Desalination and Water Purification Research Projects and Pilot Studies Receive $1.4 million from the Bureau of Reclamation
<div class="floatRight"><img src="http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/images/2014/BGNDRF.jpg" alt="Brackish Groundwater National Desalination Research Facility in Alamogordo" /><br /><span class="caption">Some research and pilot projects will be tested at<br />the Brackish Groundwater National Desalination Research Facility<br /> in Alamogordo, N.M.</span></div><b>WASHINGTON</b> - Bureau of Reclamation Acting Commissioner Lowell Pimley announced that nine research projects and pilot studies will receive $1.4 million to address desalination and water purification needs. Reclamation's Desalination and Water Purification Research Program will provide the funding for four research laboratory-scale projects and three pilot testing projects. Two previously announced pilot-scale projects will receive second-year funding. <P> "New desalination and water purification technologies have the potential to assist Reclamation and its partners confront the widening imbalances between supply and demand in river basins throughout the West," Acting Commissioner Pimley said. "Fostering development of new technologies will help improve the options communities have to be resilient to climate change and meet future water demands." <P> Research laboratory projects are small-scale projects used to determine if a process is feasible. Funding is provided for one year and is capped at $150,000 per project. Projects selected for funding are: <P> <ul> <li>University of Houston (Texas); Advanced Pretreatment for Nanofiltration of Brackish Surface Water: Fouling Control and Water Quality Improvements; $150,000</li> <li>California State Polytechnic University, Pomona; Development of Photovoltaic Electrodialysis Desalination System; $99,992</li> <li>University of Texas at San Antonio; Activated Sludge Aeration Waste Heat for Membrane Evaporation of Desalination Brine Concentrate; $85,587</li> <li>West Basin Municipal Water District (California); Subsurface Intake Study for Ocean-Water Desalination; $150,000</li> </ul> <P> Pilot-scale projects are preceded by research studies that demonstrate a technology works. The goal of a pilot study is to determine the physical viability and suitability of a process on a larger scale. Projects selected for funding are: <P> <ul> <li>Eastern Municipal Water District (California); Pilot Scale Groundwater Desalter Brine Concentrator Study; $131,057</li> <li>New Mexico State University; Demonstration of Monovalent Selective Ion Exchange Membranes for Desalination and Reuse Enhancement; $199,944</li> <li>San Diego County Water Authority (California); Pilot Testing Program for the Proposed Camp Pendleton Seawater Desalination Project; $200,000</li> </ul> <P> If the selected pilot projects complete a sufficient amount of work in the first year, they may receive additional funding for a second year. The Eastern Municipal Water District is a one-year project. <P> Also, two pilot studies announced in 2013 will receive funding for their second year of testing. Those pilot studies are: <P> <ul> <li>City of Corpus Christi (Texas); City of Corpus Christi Desalination Pilot Study; $200,000</li> <li>University of Arizona; Reverse Osmosis Concentrate Management through Halophyte Farming; $186,328</li> </ul> <P> A complete description of all the projects is available at: <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/awt">www.usbr.gov/awt</a>. <P> The Desalination and Water Purification Program is helping Reclamation and its partners confront widening imbalances between supply and demand in basins throughout the West through testing and development of new advanced water treatment technologies. It focuses on three main goals: (1) augment the supply of usable water in the United States; (2) understand the environmental impacts of desalination and develop approaches to minimize these impacts relative to other water supply alternatives; and (3) develop approaches to lower the financial costs of desalination so that it is an attractive option relative to other alternatives in locations where traditional sources of water are inadequate. <P> To learn more about Reclamation's Advanced Water Treatment activities, please visit: <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/research/AWT/DWPR/">http://www.usbr.gov/research/AWT/DWPR/</a>. <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=47586 Applied Science Projects Receive $448,400 — Projects Will Inform Desert and Southern Rockies Landscape Conservation Cooperatives
WASHINGTON - Bureau of Reclamation Acting Commissioner Lowell Pimley announced that six applied science projects will receive $448,400 to deliver new capabilities for the Desert and Southern Rockies Landscape Conservation Cooperatives. These projects will address priority resource needs identified by Reclamation and partners involved in both Landscape Conservation Cooperatives. <P> "Reclamation serves as a co-manager of the watersheds and ecosystems in the West," Pimley said. "Working with all the partners of the LCCs, Reclamation is fostering collaboration among interested parties within the landscapes to inform climate adaptation strategies." <P> The Desert LCC priority is to study wildfire impacts on riparian areas and study environmental flow impacts on the Colorado River Delta. The Desert LCC encompasses portions of five states: Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico and Texas. It includes several large river systems, including the lower Colorado, Gila, Rio Grande, San Pedro and Verde Rivers. The selected projects are: <P> <ul> <li>Texas A&M AgriLife Research - Fire-Smart Southwestern Riparian Landscape Management and Restoration of Native Biodiversity in View of Species of Conservation Concern and the Impacts of Tamarisk Beetles, Reclamation Funding: $98,868, Applicant Funding: $115,692</li> <li>Sonoran Institute - Sustainability and Vulnerability of Colorado River Delta Riparian Habitat Under Different Climate Change, Environmental Flow, and Agricultural Water Management Scenarios, Reclamation Funding: $50,000, Applicant Funding: $50,000</li> <li>Environmental Defense Fund - Water Delivery Data and Model Integration for Restoring Ecological Health to the Colorado River Delta, Reclamation Funding: $100,000, Applicant Funding: $159,607</li> </ul> <P> The Southern Rockies LCC targeted future water availability and quantity, projecting resiliency and vulnerability of natural or cultural resources, and assessing and evaluating natural or cultural resources management practices and adaptation opportunities. The Southern Rockies LCC encompasses large portions of four states: Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah as well as smaller parts of Idaho, Nevada and Wyoming. The three projects selected are: <P> <ul> <li>Museum of Northern Arizona - Developing a geodatabase and collaborative tools to support seeps and spring dependent species in the Southern Rockies LCC, Federal Funding: $99,997, Total Project Cost: $100,461</li> <li>Northern Arizona University - Linking Forest Landscape Management and Climate Change to the Conservation of Riparian Habitat in the Grand Canyon, Reclamation Funding: $96,535, Applicant Funding: $147,699</li> <li>Trout Unlimited - Adopt a Trout Program for the Henrys Fork of the Green River, Federal Funding: $3,000, Applicant Funding: $13,900</li> </ul> <P> A complete description of all the projects is available at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/lcc">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/lcc</a>. LCCs are partnerships of governmental (federal, state, tribal and local) and non-governmental entities. The primary goal of the LCCs is to bring together science and resource management to inform climate adaptation strategies to address climate change and other stressors within an ecological region, or "landscape." There are 22 different LCCs across the United States, territories and other countries. To learn more about Landscape Conservation Cooperatives, visit www.lccnetwork.org. <P> To learn more about these funding opportunities visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/lcc">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/lcc</a>. To learn more about the Desert LCC, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/dlcc">www.usbr.gov/dlcc</a>. To learn more about the Southern Rockies LCC, please visit <a href="http://southernrockieslcc.org">southernrockieslcc.org</a>. <P> <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=47367 Nine Projects Receive $1.29 Million from Reclamation for Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Feasibility Studies
<b>WASHINGTON</b> - Bureau of Reclamation Acting Commissioner Lowell Pimley announced that Reclamation will provide $1.29 million to nine projects for Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Feasibility Studies. These nine projects are located in California, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas. <P> "Planning and preparation are essential for communities looking to meet their growing water needs," Pimley said. "This funding will help communities gather critical information in assessing whether these water recycling and reuse projects can meet their future water needs." <P> The first funding group will receive up to $150,000 and studies must be completed within 18 months. The six selected projects in this group are: <P> <ul> <li>Pitkin County Clean Water Effluent Re-Use Feasibility Study, Pitkin County (Colorado), $149,500</li> <li>Providing for Santa Fe Basin's Future Water Supply Needs: A Feasibility Study to Optimize the use of Regional Reclaimed Wastewater, City of Santa Fe (New Mexico), $132,000</li> <li>Port Isabel Water Reclamation Facility, Laguna Madre Water District (Texas), $150,000</li> <li>Feasibility Study of Augmenting Regional Water Supply System for Tarrant Regional Water District and Wichita Falls with Impaired Groundwater Supplies, Tarrant Regional Water District (Texas), $150,000</li> <li>Feasibility Study of Industrial Water Management and Reclamation for the Permian Basin, Gulf Coast Waste Disposal Authority (Texas), $150,000</li> <li>Collection, Storage, Recharge and Recovery of Conserved Source Waters for Advanced Purified Treatment of Reclaimed Water, El Paso Water Utilities-Public Service Board (Texas), $150,000</li> </ul> <P> The second funding group will receive up to $450,000 (up to $150,000 per year) and studies must be completed within 36 months. The three selected projects in this group are: <P> <ul> <li>San Juan Groundwater Basin Recharge, Reclamation and Reuse Feasibility Study, Santa Margarita Water District (California), $225,000</li> <li>Indirect Potable Reuse Project Feasibility Study, Eastern Municipal Water District (California), $450,000</li> <li>The Integrated Water and Power Project: A Drought-Proof Water Supply for Texas, Guadalupe Blanco River Authority (Texas), $450,000</li> </ul> <P> Applicants must provide at least 50 percent non-federal cost-shared funding for the feasibility study. To view a complete description of all the projects, please visit: <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/title">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/title</a>. <P> The Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Program focuses on identifying and investigating opportunities to reclaim and reuse wastewater and naturally impaired ground and surface water in the 17 Western states and Hawaii. It has the potential to provide communities with a new source of clean water while promoting water and energy efficiency and environmental stewardship. Through Title XVI projects, Reclamation has conserved nearly 390,000 acre-feet of water in 2013 – enough to supply 1.5 million people with water for one year. <P> WaterSMART is the U.S. Department of the Interior's sustainable water initiative that uses the best available science to improve water conservation and help water resource managers identify strategies to narrow the gap between supply and demand. Since its establishment in 2010, WaterSMART has provided about $200 million in competitively awarded funding to non-federal partners, including tribes, water districts, municipalities and universities through WaterSMART Grants and the Title XVI Program. Learn more at <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART">http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART</a>. <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=47186 Reclamation Funds Study for Sustainable Water Management in Oregon’s Upper Deschutes Basin
BEND, Ore.– The Department of the Interior announced today that the Bureau of Reclamation will make $1.8 million available for comprehensive water studies addressing climate change options to three western river basins, including the Upper Deschutes Basin in Oregon. These studies will address basin-wide efforts to evaluate and address the effects of climate change and define options for meeting future water demands. <P> “Reclamation and its partners in the West have a long history of working together to evaluate and address the impacts to water availability in river basins,” said Reclamation’s Acting Commissioner Lowell Pimley. “In the face of climate change, changing snowpack, changing precipitation patterns and reduced water supplies, these comprehensive basin studies will assist in long-term planning goals for crucial water supplies and to help ensure a future of healthy habitats and communities.” <P> Surface water in the Upper Deschutes Basin has been almost fully allocated since the early 1900s, and many stream reaches suffer from low flows at critical times of year. The study will examine strategies to meet minimum flow targets to help ensure that the ongoing effort to reintroduce steelhead trout and Chinook salmon in the basin will continue to be successful. <P> The study builds upon past work to update groundwater and surface water models, develop a basin specific climate analysis, update supply and demand projections and identify specific actions that can be taken to resolve water issues in the basin. Basin Study results will be used to develop a long term basin-wide water management plan to guide sustainable water management actions in the future. <P> The Upper Deschutes Basin brings together a diverse set of stakeholders to seek specific solutions for resolving water supply and demand imbalances for agriculture, municipal and environmental uses. Reclamation will collaborate with the Deschutes Basin Board of Control and the Basin Study workgroup. <P> The federal funding comes through the Department of the Interior’s WaterSMART Basin Study Program. WaterSMART provides leadership and tools to states and local communities to address current and potential imbalances between water supply and demand and to work toward sustainable solutions. Since its establishment in 2010, WaterSMART has provided more than $200 million in competitively awarded funding to non-federal partners, including tribes, water districts, municipalities and universities through WaterSMART Grants and the Title XVI Program. <P> Other selected basins include the Upper Red River Basin Study in Oklahoma and the Missouri River Headwaters Basin in Montana. To see the full DOI news release visit http://www.interior.gov/news/pressreleases/watersmart-funding.cfm. <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=46906 Secretary Jewell Announces $20 Million in WaterSMART Funding for Water Reclamation and Reuse Projects in Drought Stricken California
<b>WASHINGTON</b> – As part of the Obama Administration's continued effort to bring relief to California communities suffering from the historic drought, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced today that the Bureau of Reclamation will invest $20 million in nine water reclamation and reuse projects. <P> "Climate change impacts are being felt across the landscape in California, but we can bring some relief to the drought stricken region through innovative efforts that will provide communities with a new source of water, support jobs, and stretch their limited water supplies," said Secretary Jewell. "The National Climate Assessment that was just released warns that heat, drought, and competition for water supplies will only increase in California with continued climate change, making water reclamation and reuse an important tool in our efforts to combat climate change." <P> The <a href="http://www.doi.gov/watersmart/html/index.php">Department of the Interior's WaterSMART Program</a> provided the funding for the California projects under Title XVI of the Reclamation Wastewater and Groundwater Study and Facilities Act. Through the Title XVI program, Interior's Bureau of Reclamation provides funding for projects that reclaim and reuse municipal, industrial, domestic or agricultural wastewater and naturally impaired ground or surface waters. The nine projects in California will receive cost-shared funding for planning, design and construction of their projects. <P> "Through WaterSMART, the Bureau of Reclamation helps local communities invest in modern water conservation and other infrastructure projects across the West," said Bureau of Reclamation Acting Commissioner Lowell Pimley. "Through comprehensive Title XVI efforts, we helped conserve nearly 390,000 acre feet of water in 2013 – enough to supply 1.5 million people with water for an entire year." <P> For complete descriptions on the awarded projects or to learn more about WaterSMART Title XVI funding, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/title/">HERE</a>. <P> The Watsonville Area Water Recycling Program in Watsonville, Calif., for example, will receive $3.9 million to reduce over-drafting of groundwater resources and subsequent seawater intrusion. The program recycles 4,000 acre-feet of effluent from the city's wastewater treatment plant each year that is blended with higher quality water to reduce salinity. The recycled water is then transported to agricultural users for irrigation purposes in the Pajaro Valley. The Victor Valley Subregional Water Reclamation Authority will receive $3 million to assist construction of two sub-regional water reclamation plants to produce high quality effluent that will be used to recharge the groundwater basin and serve recycled water to customers in Hesperia and Apple Valley. The two plants will provide 4,480 acre-feet-per-year of recycled water with a build- out capacity of 17,920 acre-feet-per-year. This recycled water will replace groundwater and water imported through the State Water Project from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. <P> WaterSMART is the U.S. Department of the Interior's sustainable water initiative that uses the best available science to improve water conservation and help water resource managers identify strategies to narrow the gap between supply and demand. Since its establishment in 2010, WaterSMART has provided more than $180 million in competitively awarded funding to non-federal partners, including tribes, water districts, municipalities and universities through WaterSMART Grants and the Title XVI Program. <P> Proposals were ranked through a published set of criteria in which points were awarded for projects that effectively stretch water supplies and contribute to water supply sustainability, address water quality concerns or benefit endangered species, incorporate the use of renewable energy or address energy efficiency, deliver water at a reasonable cost relative to other water supply options, and meet other program goals. <P> The WaterSMART funding announcement follows the May 6 White House release of the <a href="http://www.globalchange.gov/">Third National Climate Assessment</a>, which provides details on how climate change already is affecting every region of the United States—making innovative tools such as water reclamation and reuse essential in carrying out the <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/climate-change">President's Climate Action Plan</a>. <P> The National Climate Assessment says: <P> <blockquote>Increased heat and changes to rain and snowpack will send ripple effects throughout the <a href="http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/highlights/regions/southwest#fn:c9075dbc-f7c8-4d85-b534-e97282562b3e">[Southwest] region</a>, affecting 56 million people – a population expected to increase to 94 million by 2050– and its critical agriculture sector. Severe and sustained drought will stress water sources, already over-utilized in many areas, forcing increasing competition among farmers, energy producers, urban dwellers, and ecosystems for the region's most precious resource. Climate changes pose challenges for an already parched region that is expected to get hotter and, in its southern half, significantly drier.</blockquote> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=46805 WaterSMART Funding Opportunity Available to Establish or Expand Watershed Groups
<div class="floatRight"><img src="http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/images/email/2014-05-07-cwmp.png" width="200" height="259" alt="Cooperative Watershed Management Program grant package cover sheet." border="1" /></div><b>WASHINGTON</b> - The Bureau of Reclamation's Cooperative Watershed Management Program is accepting applications from entities seeking to establish or expand watershed management groups. The funding opportunity announcement is available at <a href="http://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> by searching for funding opportunity R14AS00038. <P> Funding is available for states, Indian tribes, irrigation districts, water districts or other organizations with water or power delivery authority located in the western United States or United States Territories to establish a watershed group. Funding is also available for an existing watershed group to expand. Applications are due on June 6, 2014 at 3 p.m. Mountain Standard Time. <P> Up to $100,000 in Federal funds may be awarded to an applicant with no more than $50,000 awarded in each year of the project. A non-federal cost share contribution is not required. Some awards for this program will be made in fiscal year 2015 once appropriations are approved by Congress. <P> WaterSMART is the U.S. Department of the Interior's sustainable water initiative that uses the best available science to improve water conservation and help water resource managers identify strategies to narrow the gap between supply and demand. Since its establishment in 2010, WaterSMART has provided more than $161 million in competitively-awarded funding to non-federal partners, including tribes, water districts, municipalities and universities through WaterSMART Grants and the Title XVI Program. <P> The Cooperative Watershed Management Program provides funding for watershed groups to encourage diverse stakeholders to form local groups to address their water management needs. To learn more about the Cooperative Watershed Management Program please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/cwmp">www.usbr.gov/watersmart/cwmp</a>. <P> <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=46724 Bureau of Reclamation Water Management Video Series Highlights Collaborative Research
<b>WASHINGTON</b> - The Bureau of Reclamation is releasing a series of videos summarizing collaborative research addressing climate change and variability impacts, estimating flood and drought hazards, and improving streamflow prediction. This information was presented in January at the Second Annual Progress Meeting on Reclamation Climate and Hydrology Research. <P> "For more than 100 years, Reclamation and its partners have developed the tools to guide a sustainable water and power future for the West," said Acting Commissioner Lowell Pimley. "This video series summarizes collaborative research that is another tool for Reclamation and its water users to manage water into the future." <P> To kick off the video series, Reclamation is releasing four videos. They are: <P> <ul> <li><a href="http://youtu.be/NgyrUnrbKEg" target="_blank">Improving Stream Flow Prediction Across the Contiguous United States</a> - Andy Wood, Ph.D., Hydrologist, National Center for Atmospheric Research</li> <li><a href="http://youtu.be/SPcJ2GfXlSw" target="_blank">Tracking Pathways of Atmospheric Rivers</a> - Michael Alexander, Meteorologist, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory</li> <li><a href="http://youtu.be/EOYVxidHJYc" target="_blank">Calculating Flood Risks at Our Nation's Dams</a> - Jason Caldwell, Meteorologist, Bureau of Reclamation</li> <li><a href="http://youtu.be/RIia07Y6oas" target="_blank">Examining Variability of Hydroclimate Extremes</a> - Cameron Bracken, Hydrologic Civil Engineer, Bureau of Reclamation</li> </ul> <P> The videos are available as a playlist at: <a href="http://bit.ly/climateseries">http://bit.ly/climateseries</a>. <P> Reclamation’s Research and Development Office is developing the science and tools that are critical to incorporate information on long-term climate change into water resource planning and infrastructure management. Sustainable water resource management will rely upon management strategies that effectively deliver water under a changing climate as well as including hydrologic hazard possibilities on infrastructure. Improved ability to forecast and use climate variability information may greatly enhance the flexibility of water managers and water users to plan their short-term operations and water delivery. <P> Research collaborators include Federal and non-Federal organizations, including members of the Climate Change and Water Working Group (<a href="http://www.ccawwg.us">www.ccawwg.us</a>), NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, University of Colorado CIRES and others. <P> Additional videos will be released over the next few weeks in the same playlist. When posted, the video link will be shared on Reclamation's Twitter and Facebook accounts. You can also follow by using the hashtag #climateseries. To see the videos once posted or learn more about the presentations, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/climate">www.usbr.gov/climate</a>. <P> To learn more about climate change and variability research please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/research/climate">www.usbr.gov/research/climate</a>. <P> <P> <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=46485 Reclamation Seeks Applied Science Project Applicants for Desert and Southern Rockies Landscape Conservation Cooperatives
<img align="right" alt="DLCC FOA Applied Science Grants" height="259" hspace="2" src="http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/images/email/2014-04-11-dlccfoa.png" style=" border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; margin: 2px;" vspace="2" width="200" /><b>WASHINGTON</b> - The Bureau of Reclamation is seeking applicants for applied science projects for the Desert and Southern Rockies Landscape Conservation Cooperatives. Proposed projects are expected to deliver new capabilities that address priority resources identified and shared by Reclamation and partners involved in the Desert and Southern Rockies LCC. <P> The Desert LCC funding opportunity is seeking applicants to study wildfire impacts on riparian areas and study environmental flow impacts on the Colorado River Delta. This funding opportunity may be found at <a href="http://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> by searching funding opportunity number R14AS00031. Applications are due May 13, 2014 at 4 p.m. MDT. <P> The Southern Rockies LCC funding opportunity targets projecting future water availability and quality, projecting the resiliency and vulnerability of natural or cultural resources, and assessing and evaluating natural or cultural resources management practices and adaptation opportunities. The funding opportunity is available at <a href="http://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> by searching funding opportunity number R14AS00032. Applications are due May 13, 2014 at 4 p.m. MDT. <P> Approximately $700,000 will be available for Desert and Southern Rockies LCC projects combined. Up to $100,000 in federal funding will be available for each project award. Reclamation's share of each proposed project shall not exceed 50 percent of the total project cost. <P> The Desert LCC encompasses portions of five states: Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico and Texas, as well as a substantial portion of Northern Mexico. The area is topographically complex, including three different deserts (Mojave, Sonoran and Chihuahuan), grasslands and valley bottoms and the isolated mountain ranges in the southern portion of the LCC (Apache Highlands and the New Mexico-Texas Highlands, also known as the Sky Islands). There are several large river systems, including the lower Colorado, Gila, Rio Grande, San Pedro and Verde Rivers. <P> <img align="right" alt="Southern Rockies LCC FOA Report Header" height="259" hspace="2" src="http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/images/email/2014-04-11-srlccfoa.png" style=" border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; margin: 2px;" vspace="2" width="200" />The Southern Rockies LCC encompasses large portions of four states: Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah, as well as smaller parts of Idaho, Nevada and Wyoming. The area is geographically complex, including wide elevation and topographic variation, from 14,000 foot peaks to the Grand Canyon and cold desert basins. This topographically complex region includes the headwaters of the Colorado River and Rio Grande, the Wasatch and Uinta Mountains to the west and the Southern Rocky Mountains to the east, separated by the rugged tableland of the Colorado Plateau. <P> LCCs are partnerships of governmental (federal, state, tribal and local) and non-governmental entities. The primary goal of the LCCs is to bring together science and resource management to inform climate adaptation strategies to address climate change and other stressors within an ecological region, or "landscape." There are 22 different LCCs across the United States, territories and other countries. To learn more about Landscape Conservation Cooperatives, visit <a href="http://www.lccnetwork.org">www.lccnetwork.org</a>. <P> To learn more about these funding opportunities visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/LCC/">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART/LCC/</a>. To learn more about the Desert LCC, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/dlcc">www.usbr.gov/dlcc</a>. To learn more about the Southern Rockies LCC, please visit <a href="http://southernrockieslcc.org">southernrockieslcc.org</a>. <P> <P>
http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordID=46324 Bureau of Reclamation Releases Funding Opportunity Announcement of WaterSMART Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Feasibility Studies
<img align="right" alt="Title XVI FOA Cover Page" height="323" hspace="3" src="http://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/images/email/2014-03-21-TitleXVIFOA.png" style="margin: 3px; border-width: 1px; border-style: solid;" vspace="3" width="250" /><b>WASHINGTON</b> - The Bureau of Reclamation has released a WaterSMART Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Feasibility Study Funding Opportunity Announcement for non-federal government entities, Indian tribes, water districts, wastewater districts or rural water districts in the 17 western states. <P> Funding is available for two funding groups. Entities may submit applications for funding in amounts up to $150,000 for feasibility studies that can be completed within 18 months or up to $450,000 for feasibility studies that can be completed within 36 months. Applicants must provide at least 50 percent non-federal cost-shared funding for the feasibility study. A total of about $1.5 million is expected to be available this year. <P> This announcement is available at <a href="http://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> by searching for funding opportunity number R14AS00030. Proposals must be submitted as indicated on <a href="http://www.grants.gov">www.grants.gov</a> by May 6, 2014, 4:00 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time. It is anticipated that awards will be announced this summer. <P> The Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Program focuses on identifying and investigating opportunities to reclaim and reuse wastewater and naturally impaired ground and surface water in the 17 Western States and Hawaii. It has the potential to provide communities with a new source of clean water while promoting water and energy efficiency and environmental stewardship. <P> Since its establishment in 2010, WaterSMART has provided more than $161 million in competitively-awarded funding to non-federal partners, including tribes, water districts, municipalities and universities through WaterSMART Grants and the Title XVI Program. <P> To learn more about WaterSMART, please visit <a href="http://www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART">www.usbr.gov/WaterSMART</a>. <P> <P> <P>