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Lower Colorado Region
Boulder City, Nev.
Media Contact:
Robert Walsh
702-293-8421

Released On: January 26, 2005

Davis Dam Releases To Be Reduced Again
Lower Flows Confined To Night-Time/Early Morning Hours
For the second time this month, releases from Davis Dam will be reduced to approximately 2,300 cubic feet per second (cfs) during part of the day because of projected inflow to Lake Havasu from the Bill Williams River and decreased water orders below Parker Dam.

This temporary reduction in releases will help conserve water in the Colorado River Basin, which has been in a drought for the past five years.

The reduced flows will occur from 9:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. MST. Between 7:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. daily, releases will range from 4,600 cfs to 9,200 cfs.

The initial reduction to 2,300 cfs will begin tonight, January 26, at 9:00 p.m.

Following is the projected schedule of water releases at Davis Dam until Friday morning, January 28:

January 26 - January 27 9:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. 2,300 cfs (1/2 unit)

January 27 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. 4,600 cfs (one unit)

January 27 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. 9,200 cfs (two units)

January 27 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. 4,600 cfs

January 27 - January 28 8:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. 2,300 cfs.

This release pattern may be in effect until February 11. If releases from the Bill Williams River into Lake Havasu are less than projected, and depending on any impacts from the current weather system in the Southwest, releases from Davis Dam will be returned to their seasonal levels as soon as possible.

All river users should exercise extra caution during this period of fluctuating river flows.

Daily and hourly information on releases from Reclamation's Colorado River dams is available on Reclamation's web site, at http://www.usbr.gov/lc/riverops.html

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Reclamation is the largest wholesale water supplier and the second largest producer of hydroelectric power in the United States, with operations and facilities in the 17 Western States. Its facilities also provide substantial flood control, recreation, and fish and wildlife benefits. Visit our website at www.usbr.gov.