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Quagga and Zebra Mussels

Finding Durable Foul-Release Coatings to Control Invasive Mussel Attachment Highlighted in Bureau of Reclamation Study (Oct. 21, 2014) - Reclamation has released a report summarizing six years of testing coatings to control the attachment of quagga and zebra mussels to water and power facilities. Since the study began in 2008, Reclamation has tested more than 100 coatings and materials.
More... | Read the Report


New Methods Improve Quagga and Zebra Mussel Identification (Oct 31, 2013) - The earliest possible detection of quagga and zebra mussels has long been a goal of biologists seeking to discover their presence in water bodies. The Bureau of Reclamation's Detection Laboratory has released two reports identifying a new sampling method to improve the accuracy of quagga and zebra mussel detection while still at the microscopic larval stage. More...

Improving Accuracy in the Detection of Dreissenid Mussel Larvae

Polymerase Chain Reaction: Preparation and Analysis of Veliger Water Samples


Silicone Foul Release Coatings Show Most Promise at Managing Quagga and Zebra Mussels at Water and Hydropower Facilities - Reclamation has found that silicone foul release coatings may be an important tool for mitigating invasive quagga and zebra mussels' impacts to water and hydropower infrastructure. Allen D. Skaja, Ph.D., PCS, of Reclamation's Technical Service Center tested more than 50 coatings and metal alloys over three years at Parker Dam on the Colorado River. More... | Report | Video


A photo of a quagga mussel larva using a scanning electron microscope.Invasive Mussel Detection and Monitoring Program for Reclamation Reservoirs - In order to stay ahead of mussel infestations and to help guide preventative and mitigation measures, in 2009 Reclamation began a monitoring and detection program for many of its reservoirs determined most at risk of mussel exposure and infestation. More...


New Melones Lake and Lake Berryessa Quagga and Zebra Mussel Self-Certification. If you will be boating at New Melones Lake or Lake Berryessa in California this summer, make sure you self-certify that your boat is free from the invasive Quagga and Zebra Mussels. New Melones Information | Lake Berryessa Information

 

 

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History and Background
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Congressional Testimony
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Research
Current Research Activities
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Early Detection

Improving Accuracy in the Detection of Dreissenid Mussel Larvae

Polymerase Chain Reaction: Preparation and Analysis of Veliger Water Samples

Field Protocal: Field Preparation of Water Samples for Dreissenid Veliger Detection

Lab Protocol: Preparation and Analysis of Dreissenid Veliger Water Samples

Research Reports

Coatings for Mussel Control — Three Years of Laboratory and Field Testing

Improving Accuracy in the Detection of Dreissenid Mussel Larvae

Polymerase Chain Reaction: Preparation and Analysis of Veliger Water Samples

Activities by River Basin
Arkansas River
Lower Colorado River
Upper Colorado River

Documents

Management Options for Quagga & Zebra Mussels
Facility Vulnerability Template (PDF)
Facility Vulnerability Template (Word)
Equipment Inspection and Cleaning Manual (PDF)

Proceedings of 17th International Conference on Aquatic Invasive Species

Map
This map shows where Quagga and Zebra Mussels have infested or been detected in Bureau of Reclamation reservoirs or facilities. More...

Stop aquatic hitchhikers - A graphic of a boat being launched into a body water.

Last Updated: October 21, 2014