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Recreational Information
All Reclamation areasAll Reclamation recreation areas.
All RecreationThe Federal source for all Recreational information and more such as Auto Touring, Biking, Boating Camping Climbing Historic/Cultural Sites Educational Programs Fishing Fish Hatcheries Hiking Horseback Riding Hunting Lodging Off-Highway Vehicle Access Recreational Vehicles Museum/Visitors Centers Water Sports Wildlife Viewing Winter Sports
Auburn State Recreation AreaAuburn State Recreation Area - In the heart of the gold country, the Auburn State Recreation Area (Auburn SRA) covers 40-miles of the North and Middle Forks of the American river. Once teeming with thousands of gold miners, the area is now a natural area offering a wide variety of recreation opportunities to over 500,000 visitors a year.
Folsom LakeRecreation at Folsom Reservoir is managed by the California Department of Parks and Recreation under agreement with the Bureau of Reclamation, Central California Area Office. The reservoir was created by Folsom Dam across the American River. The dam is a feature of the Central Valley Project - American River Division - Folsom and Sly Park Units. Folsom Lake offers 75 miles of shoreline. Usually open 7 days a week, 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., contact the park office for seasonal variations. Facilities include 3 public campgrounds, 2 with showers, 60 miles of equestrian trails, 10 miles of paved bicycle trails, 8 miles of advanced mountain bike trails, and excellent year-round bank or boat fishing. Several launch ramps provide continuous boat launching access throughout the lake fluctuation zone. At capacity, Good fishing for both cold- and warm-water species including rainbow trout, brown trout, black bass, catfish, crappie, and bluegill. The American River Water Education Center at Folsom Dam contains exhibits that promote water education directly related to the American River Watershed.
Folsom RecreationFolsom Area and Field Offices recreational informations
Keswick DamKeswick Dam and reservoir are features of the Central Valley Project - Shasta/Tinity River Divisions. The dam creates a 23,800-acre-foot afterbay for Shasta Lake. Keswick Dam has migratory fish-trapping facilities in conjunction with the Coleman Fish Hatchery, 25 miles downstream on Battle Creek. The salmon and steelhead are trapped as they reach the dam, then transported to the fish hatchery for milking. Keswick Reservoir does not have salmon or steelhead; it does have a healthy population of wild trout, including German browns and rainbows. The majority of the fish are native. The California Department of Fish and Game occasionally plants fish in the Keswick Reservoir. Effective fly fishing, spin fishing, and bait fishing. Boat launching facilities on the south end of the reservoir. Excellent shore access on the west. Very light fishing pressure.
Lake BerressaNestled between Blue Ridge and Cedar Roughs, east of the Napa Valley, Lake Berryessa offers year-round recreation opportunities. Berryessa's water reaches temperatures of up to 75 degrees in the summer, making it an ideal place for water sports. Anglers enjoy fishing for both cold and warm water species, such as rainbow trout, bass, catfish, crappie, and bluegill. The Bureau of Reclamation provides two large day use areas (Oak Shores and Smittle Creek), Capell Cove launch ramp, and many smaller dispersed day use areas. The seven resorts around the lake are managed by concessionaires under contract with Reclamation and provide camping, day use and boating facilities.
Lewiston National Rec. AreaLewiston Dam, Central Valley Project - Shasta/Trinity Division, is about 7 miles downstream from Trinity Dam. It diverts water by means of Clear Creek Tunnel to Whiskeytown Lake. The dam is 91 feet high and 745 feet long. The Trinity River Fish Hatchery, operated by the California Department of Fish and Game, has a capacity of about 40 million eggs. It is immediately downstream from Lewiston Dam and compensates for the upstream spawning area that has been rendered inaccessible and unusable by the dams. Lewiston Lake is more like a large, cold, slow-moving river with a large population of trout. Rainbow trout range from 8 to 18 inches, 12- to 14-inch average. The German brown average over 20 inches. Effective flies either cast from a drift boat or trolled slowly. Productive slow trolling. Shore fishing produces both varieties of trout.
Natoma, LakeRecreation at Lake Natoma is managed by the California Department of Parks and Recreation under agreement with the Bureau of Reclamation. The Lake was created by Nimbus Dam across the American River. Lake Natoma is a regulating reservoir for releases from Folsom Lake. The Dam and Lake are features of the Central Valley project. Usually open 7 days per week, summer hours (April 1-October 15) are 6:00 a.m.
New MelonesNew Melones Dam and Reservoir are part of the Central Valley Project - New Melones Unit operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. Located 60 miles upstream on the Stanislaus River from the confluence of the San Joaquin River. The reservoir has a capacity of 2.4 million acre feet of water with 100 miles of shoreline, and a water surface area of 12,500 acres. New Melones is located between the historic mining towns of Sonora and Angels Camp on Highway 49 and is nestled in the Foothill Oak Woodlands of the Sierras at the 1100 ft elevation. Summer temperatures range from 85-100F and winter range from 32-60F.Gloryhole Recreation Area has two campgrounds (Big Oak and Ironhorse) with 144 campsites, 3 day-use areas, 30 miles of hiking/biking trails, a fish cleaning station, a swim beach, and 2 boat launch ramps with parking lots.
New Melones CampingNew Melones Lake offers year-round camping at two locations: Glory Hole Recreation Area, located approximately 6 miles (9 km) south of Angels Camp, California, and Tuttletown Recreation Area, located approximately 8 miles (13 km) north of Sonora, California. Both campgrounds at New Melones offer camping for tents and recreational vehicles. Walk-in campsites are also available in both recreation areas.
New Melones Visitors CenterWelcome to the New Melones Visitors Center. The Visitor Center and Museum are located on Highway 49, between Sonora and Angels Camp, just 1/4 mile south of the Highway 49 Stevenot Stanislaus River Bridge. The Visitor Center and Museum are open Memorial Weekend through Labor Day, seven days a week, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. From Labor Day through Memorial Weekend it is open five days a week, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m., and is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. Volunteers and ranger staff are available to provide you information, maps and orientation to New Melones Lake and other local interests.
Shasta National Rec AreaShasta Dam and reservoir are features of the Central Valley Project - Shasta/Trinity Divisions. Recreation at the reservoir is managed by the U.S. Forest Service under agreement with the Bureau of Reclamation, Northern California Area Office. Created by a dam across the Sacramento River, Shasta Reservoir is the largest reservoir in California with 370 miles of shoreline. Located 12 miles north of Redding, the reservoir provides excellent year-round bank or boat fishing.
Sugar PineRecreation at Sugar Pine Reservoir is managed by Tahoe National Forest under an agreement with the Bureau of Reclamation. Sugar Pine Reservoir was created by Sugar Pine Dam across Shirttail Creek. The dam is a feature of the Central Valley project, American River Division, Folsom Auburn Unit. The reservoir offers four main recreation areas around the lake. The complex, which opened in May 1985, contains two campgrounds, boat ramp, hiking trails, picnic area, swimming beach, and a trailer dump station. The facilities are operated under a concession agreement between the U.S. Forest Service and the L&L Inc. Most facilities have been designed to accommodate wheelchairs. Some facilities are available on a reservation basis only. Fishing for warm and cold water species is good. There is a boating speed limit on the lake of ten miles per hour.
Trinity River National Wildlife RefugeTrinity River National Wildlife Refuge was established on January 4, 1994 with an initial purchase of 4,400 acres. Since that time, the refuge has acquired additional acreage which now totals 17,500 acres.