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Major Accomplishments: Battle Creek Fish Restoration Project

interactive image:  photo - Coleman Diversion Dam is one of the affected structures; click for larger photo
Coleman Diversion Dam is one of the affected structures.

Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Michael Connor and top officials from other agencies participated in a September 2010 groundbreaking ceremony for the Battle Creek Salmon and Steelhead Restoration Project.

The project is among the largest cold-water anadromous fish restoration efforts in North America. Anadromous fish spawn in fresh water but spend most of their lives in the ocean, then return to their native streams to reproduce. Habitat restoration and enhancement will enable safe passage, growth and recovery for threatened and endangered Chinook salmon and Central Valley steelhead trout – all listed as threatened or endangered

The Restoration Project involves removing five hydropower diversion dams and constructing fish screens and ladders on three hydropower diversion dams in Shasta and Tehama counties near Manton, California. The work will result in the restoration and enhancement of fish and wildlife habitat along 48 miles of Battle Creek and its tributaries and the increase of water flow releases into Battle Creek. It will eliminate the mixing of waters between drainage basins.

static image:  photo - Commissioner Michael Connor speaks at the Battle Creek groundbreaking ceremony; click for larger photo
Commissioner Michael Connor speaks at the Battle Creek groundbreaking ceremony.

The September 2010 groundbreaking reflected a decade of commitment and dedication to the project. The effort culminated in a ceremony attended by representatives of Reclamation, Pacific Gas and Electric, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, and California Department of Fish and Game. The five primary partners symbolically turned a wheel at Coleman Dam along the banks of the South Fork of BattleCreek.

Project History

A Memorandum of Understanding between PG&E, Reclamation, and other federal and state agencies was signed in 1999, committing each to the restoration project. Numerous other partners have played an important role in advancing the project.

Project funding has been provided by federal and state agencies, and includes nearly $7 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Additional financial support was provided by the Packard Foundation (via The Nature Conservancy), the California Wildlife Conservation Board, the California Department of Fish and Game, the California Department of Transportation, the Battle Creek Watershed Conservancy, the Greater Battle Creek Watershed Working Group, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, the California Department of Water Resources, and the Iron Mountain Mine Trustee Council.

static image:  photo - Contractors demolish Wildcat Dam on Battle Creek; click for larger photo
Contractors demolish Wildcat Dam on Battle Creek.

Construction of the Project

Two construction contracts were awarded in late 2009, and on-site construction began at the Wildcat, Eagle Canyon and North Battle Creek Feeder sites on the North Fork of Battle Creek in April 2010. Wildcat Dam has been removed, and construction crews are installing fish ladders and screens at the Eagle Canyon and North Battle Creek Feeder Diversion Dam sites. A third construction contract was awarded in June 2010, and includes building a bypass and connector at the Inskip Powerhouse/Coleman Diversion Dam site on the South Fork of Battle Creek. The project is expected to be completed in 2014.

More information can be found at http://www.usbr.gov/mp/battlecreek/.

static image:  photo - Excavating fish screen and ladder; click for larger photo
static image:  photo - Cofferdam and bypass pipes upstream from a dam; click for larger photo
static image:  photo - Workers stack sections of pipeline from Wildcat Diversion Dam; click for larger photo
Excavating fish screen and ladder. Cofferdam and bypass pipes upstream from a dam. Workers stack sections of pipeline from Wildcat Diversion Dam.
interactive image:  photo - The concrete footings for the pipeline; click for larger photo
interactive image:  photo - Cofferdam and bypass pipes being installed at Eagle Canyon Diversion Dam; click for larger photo
interactive image:  photo - Contractors construct North Battle Creek feeder diversion dam, fish screen and ladder; click for larger photo
The concrete footings for the pipeline. Cofferdam and bypass pipes being installed at Eagle Canyon Diversion Dam. Contractors construct North Battle Creek feeder diversion dam, fish screen and ladder.
Interactive image:  photo - Ceremonial start of the project: Shown from left, Monica Medina, Principal Deputy Undersecretary for Oceans and Atmosphere, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Michael Connor, Commissioner, Bureau of Reclamation; Robert Clarke, Acting Assistant Regional Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Randy Livingston, Vice President of Power Generation, Pacific Gas and Electric Co.; and Neil Manji, Regional Manager, Northern Region, California Department of Fish and Game; click for larger photo
Ceremonial start of the project: Shown from left, Monica Medina, Principal Deputy Undersecretary for Oceans and Atmosphere, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Michael Connor, Commissioner, Bureau of Reclamation; Robert Clarke, Acting Assistant Regional Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Randy Livingston, Vice President of Power Generation, Pacific Gas and Electric Co.; and Neil Manji, Regional Manager, Northern Region, California Department of Fish and Game.
Battle Creek Salmon and Steelhead
“The project demonstrates that through cooperation, federal and state agencies, private industry and nonprofit organizations can restore fish species, while allowing continued production of renewable energy” – Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar

 

 


April 1, 2011