Previous Grant Selections

Grants to Develop Climate Analysis Tools were first awarded in 2010 when five projects were selected to receive $773,483. In its second year, seven projects were selected to receive $1.2 million.

2011

Seven Projects in Four States Receive $1.2 Million in WaterSMART Grants to Better Manage Water Resources in a Changing Climate - (July 26, 2011) Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Michael L. Connor announced the selection of seven applied science projects to receive $1.2 million funding for the enhancement of water resource management in a changing climate. Facilitating the development of new tools that allow better management of water resources is one of the strategies of the Department of the Interior's WaterSMART Program which paves the way to a sustainable water future. This funding will be leveraged to fund over $2.7 million in applied science projects in Arizona, California, Nevada and Utah. Read More →

Projects receiving funding in 2011:

  • Desert Research Institute in Nevada will receive $199,761 for the evaluation of evapotranspiration and irrigation water requirements in a changing climate.
  • Southern Nevada Water Authority will receive $188,410 to enhance resource management of the Colorado River through understanding changes to water quality and sediment transport in Lake Mead.
  • Desert Research Institute in Nevada will receive $126,014 to develop and evaluate regional climate downscaling techniques that will benefit understanding future surface and groundwater supplies.
  • Southern Nevada Water Authority will receive $200,000 to evaluate potential future additional utilization of water resources in the eastern great basin.
  • Utah State University will receive $141,033 to provide more accurate projections of seasonal precipitation cycles within the upper Colorado River basin.
  • University of California at Irvine will receive $200,000 to utilize novel statistical techniques to quantify the uncertainty associated with the current suite of global climate models.
  • University of Arizona will receive $200,000 to do a two-phase project where they will use tree-ring data to reconstruct the historical flows of the Klamath and San Joaquin Rivers and update the reconstructed flows of the Sacramento River. The researchers will then construct a database and incorporate the tree-ring data and flow reconstruction into a climatological framework.

2010

Reclamation Selects Research Grants to Develop Climate Analysis Tools through WaterSMART Program - (Aug 12, 2010) Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Michael Connor announced the selection of $773,483 in research grant proposals to develop climate analysis tools. This money will be leveraged to fund $1,624,396 in climate change research. Read More →

Projects receiving grants in 2010

  • Climate Central, Inc., a non-profit, collaborative group of scientists will receive $200,000 in Reclamation funding with a total project cost of $400,000. They will create a comprehensive and new historical climate data set for the western United States. The project will also create an associated set of downscaled projections of future climate for the region in a complementary manner to temperature and precipitation projections currently in existence by including descriptions of solar radiation and wind speed, for example.
  • The University of Colorado Regents, through the Center for Advanced Decision Support for Water and Environmental Services, will receive $150,000 in Reclamation funding with a total project cost of $372,418. They will develop a set of tools to facilitate robust water management decision-making. The project will add new capabilities to RiverWare, an existing water management tool, so that adaptation strategies can be evaluated to reduce the risk and impacts associated with climate change to future water systems operations.
  • The Oklahoma Water Resources Board and the Oklahoma Climatological Survey will receive $84,647 in Reclamation funding for a total project cost of $174,293. They will provide practical methodologies and tools to assist with the incorporation of climate change impacts into water resources planning efforts within the State of Oklahoma and beyond. It will explore multiple methods for translating climate projections into estimates of water supply availability through explicit and implicit hydrological modeling.
  • Dr. Bridget R. Scanlon of the University of Texas at Austin - Bureau of Economic Geology -will receive $199,999 in Reclamation funding with a total project cost of $399,999. The University of Texas will study the impacts of past droughts and potential future droughts with the geographic area of the High Plains aquifer. It will explore the relationship between the climate of the 20th Century, the High Plains Aquifer, and the droughts of the 1930's and 1950's.
  • The Arizona Board of Regents through the University of Arizona will receive $138,837 in Reclamation funding with a total project cost of $277,686. This project will study the impacts of climate change and climate variability on the water demand of growing cities as demands are compounded by the "urban heat island" effect, which is an increase in temperatures relative to the surrounding environment resulting from the infrastructure in urban environments.
Last Updated: June 17, 2015