Previous Grant Selections

2011

Reclamation Awards $2.09 Million to Study New Water Treatment Technologies - (July 25, 2011) Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Michael L. Connor has announced that four projects have been awarded $2.09 million to accelerate the adoption and use of innovative advanced water treatment technologies that increase usable water supplies. Demonstrating the feasibility of new treatment methods for impaired waters is one of the strategies of the Department of the Interior's WaterSMART Program to work toward a sustainable water future. Read More →

The four selected projects are:

  • Los Angeles Department of Public Works will receive $499,232 to treat arsenic-laden waters to meet drinking water standards. The full-scale project could potentially produce 36,000 acre-feet of treated water annually, or about 98 percent of the projected water imbalance in the immediate area.
  • The city of Glendale in California will receive $400,000 to evaluate two treatment technologies to remove hexavalent chromium from the local impaired groundwater source in the cities of Glendale and Los Angeles.
  • Los Angeles Department of Water and Power will receive $598,000 to test the ability of a biological treatment process to remove nitrates, perchlorate and volatile organic compounds from the groundwater in the area. The full-scale project will provide 77,438 acre-feet of treated water annually; reducing the city's need for imported water from the California State Water Project.
  • Loving County in west Texas will receive $600,000 to study treating brackish groundwater with wind powered vapor compression technology. The funding will be used to examine the ability of this technology to provide a local, sustainable water source.

2010

Reclamation Announces $2 Million for Advanced Water Treatment Pilot and Demonstration Grants through WaterSMART Program - (Aug 12, 2010) Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Michael Connor announced the selection of $2,034,208 in WaterSMART grants for Advanced Water Treatment Pilot and Demonstration projects. This money will be leveraged to fund over $14.9 million in total project costs. Read More →

  • Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County, Joint Water Purification Pilot Program. These districts will receive $334,208 in Reclamation funding with a total project cost of $831,907. The Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County and the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California will collaborate on the proposed project that will evaluate the feasibility of a regional indirect potable reuse program to purify treated wastewater.
  • Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Groundwater Replenishment Treatment Pilot Study. They will receive $600,000 in Reclamation funding with a total project cost of $2,274,099. The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power will address the technical and economic viability of groundwater replenishment in the City of Los Angeles. Groundwater replenishment sends advanced treated recycled water to spreading basins to percolate underground and become part of the groundwater supply for future use.
  • West Basin Municipal Water District (California), Ocean Water Desalination Demonstration Project. This district will receive $600,000 in Reclamation funding with a total project cost of $10,600,526. The Ocean Water Desalination Demonstration Project will evaluate various alternative technologies for ocean water desalination along the Pacific Ocean. The demonstration facility will utilize approximately 580,000 gallons per day of ocean water to test intake technologies, pre-treatment systems, reverse osmosis technology, and post-treatment options.
  • Municipal Water District of Orange County, Pilot Plant Testing of Slant Well Seawater Intakes and Advanced Water Treatment Pretreatment Technologies for Control and Removal of Low Levels of Iron and Manganese. This project will receive $500,000 in Reclamation funding with a total project cost of $1,250,000. The project will develop pilot tests for a new operational pilot seawater desalination test facility. The facility will implement a slant well intake, which is meant to avoid environmental concerns associated with open-intake facilities by utilizing natural filtration through the ocean floor and underlying alluvial deposits.
Last Updated: June 17, 2015